1. ComputerGuy

    ComputerGuy Retired Air Force

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    Are there any suggestions in storing yeast long term? I searched and saw the life is 1 year frozen, but what other ways are there to store or to ensure you have some for the future?
     
  2. bunkerbob

    bunkerbob Supporting Member

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    I just keep it refrigerated, loses some effectiveness but still ok. I still have my 100yr old sourdough in the refer also, it never, yes I said never goes bad. I have personally had it since 1972, got it from a 90yr old neighbor that got it from here father. Just refresh it once in a while, thats all.
     

  3. BadgeBunny

    BadgeBunny Well-Known Member

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    I have a container of yeast that I am using right now that the "best if used by" date was 3 years ago. It has been in my freezer. I can't tell if it is "slow" or not because it is so danged cold right now my bread is taking forever to rise. :( (But it was working fine before this cold snap.)
     
  4. lotsoflead

    lotsoflead Well-Known Member

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    I have about 25 pounds in a freezer,it should last for 5 yrs when the SHsTF. when we've used it all, then we'll go to a starter.
     
  5. BasecampUSA

    BasecampUSA Sr. Homesteader

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    I've got about 10 pounds in my freezer all the time. We rotate it. Whenever there is a sign of crisis I go out and buy another 10 to boot.

    We have some that we forgot we had since Y2K (12 years old in freezer), and it will still start and grow with sugar and water to make a tasty loaf of bread!

    You can make you own yeast too!
    http://www.atomicvole.org/docs/grow_yeast.pdf

    - Basey
     
  6. Herbalpagan

    Herbalpagan Well-Known Member

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    frozen yeast will last 5 yrs. in the big vacuum packs on the shelf it will last for a couple of years.
    making your own sourbough starter is easy and recipes are all over the web. that stuff will go on forever if you take care of it!
     
  7. LadyIvy

    LadyIvy Member

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    I have a question about this. I am extremely new to all of this so I apologize in advance as my questions will probably seem foolish.
    For those of you that say you have large stores of yeast (and other foods) in the freezer, what plan do you have to keep the freezer going when the SHTF? Going on the assumption that when it really, really hits the fan that we will lose power for an extended time/forever.
     
  8. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    I don't know how long it lasts. I have a few packs in the deep freezer in the basement but after learning about sourdough, there's no point in buying and storing what you can easily make.
     
  9. BadgeBunny

    BadgeBunny Well-Known Member

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    With yeast you can move it to a cool, dark place and it will still remain good for a considerable length of time (like a couple of years at least). I used yeast packages that fell into the back of my spice cabinet and were there forever (no freezing or special care obviously) and it worked fine.

    It is heat that kills yeast so the cooler the better in terms of long term storage, but unless the heat is extreme you will still have a considerable amount of time that it will be useable after exposed to "regular" conditions.
     
  10. BadgeBunny

    BadgeBunny Well-Known Member

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    I have both (yeast stored in the freezer and sourdough) because I like the taste of "regular" breads as well as sourdough breads.

    Just bought a bread book off the bargain rack that has a different section for breads that are popular in different regions of the world. I can hardly wait to start trying them out ... very interesting in terms of the histories behind some of them.
     
  11. LadyIvy

    LadyIvy Member

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    Good to know. Thanks Badge Bunny
     
  12. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    With all this talk about yeast, it makes me think that maybe I should go out and buy some and learn how to make stuff with it. I have been cooking and baking for years (decades) and I have never done anything with yeast.

    Looks like it is time to learn a new trick.
     
  13. BadgeBunny

    BadgeBunny Well-Known Member

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    My husband thinks a SHTF situation is when I haven't baked and he has to eat store bought bread ... even the artisan stuff that they swear is home made doesn't cut it anymore ... :rolleyes:

    Yeah ... he is spoiled ... :p
     
  14. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    Don't sweat it Naekid, I find the baking powder stuff like biscuits or pancakes much easier than yeast stuff like bread anyway. I don't need to be Emeril, I'm happy to bake "ok" food for now. I'm sure it will improve with practice.
     
  15. TwoHoot

    TwoHoot Member

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    Real World Yeast Storage Test

    Back in October, I found a half-used 4oz jar of Fleischmann's Active Dry Yeast back in a cabinet corner. The expiration date on the lid was Jan 09 05. It has been opened and was 5 years out of date. I made bread with it and it worked just as well as a new package.

    Storage conditions: It was out of sight in a dark cabinet corner. Our thermostat stays at 68 F in the winter and 78 F in the summer. I would estimate that the average storage temp for the years it was there to be about 76 F with an extreme low above 65 and an extreme high below 85. Humidity is low consistently.

    For what it is worth.

    Cordially,
    TwoHoot
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2011
  16. BadgeBunny

    BadgeBunny Well-Known Member

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    **sigh** What I would give ... :D
     
  17. TwoHoot

    TwoHoot Member

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    << Humidity is low consistently. >>

    Maybe it is a matter of perspective - I moved here from Houston.

    Cordially,
    TwoHoot
     
  18. BadgeBunny

    BadgeBunny Well-Known Member

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    :D LOL :2thumb:
     
  19. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    I like to qualify many of my statements, so once again I am no expert but I'm pretty sure it takes heat or alcohol (during fermentation) to kill yeast. Other wise it's pretty tough. I think sourdough is the best way to go for LTS. Why buy what you can make for free.
     
  20. BadgeBunny

    BadgeBunny Well-Known Member

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    I have worked with sourdough on and off for a couple of years now. Not sure what my problem is but my results are iffy at best.

    I'll keep trying but given the fact that yeast will keep almost forever in a cool, dry, dark place I'll keep a few pounds back, just in case.