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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Just something I have been wondering about, it might be interesting:

What made you think about preparedness the first time? Was it something you experienced, a discussion you had, something you read in the newspapers, because of the education your parents gave you, etc. ?

And how did people around you (husband/wife, girlfriend/boyfriend, brothers/sisters, parents or other family,...) react when you first started thinking and speaking of this?

I'm interested in what the responses will be!

greetz,

V.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Well, let me make the first step:

Although we at home have always had a pretty self-reliant upbringing, I never really considered things like 'preparing for the worst', 'what-if-scenarios', etc until about 2 years ago:

My grandparents (father's side) had invited us all for dinner in a nice restaurant, not for a particular reason, just to be together with family. While we were chit chatting about the usual things, inevitably the topic of future prospects came up. I started off carefully saying that I had this feeling that things in society were not going the right way, that harder times may come. I told them that I got this feeling from reading through reports, articles,... on the subjects of population growth, geo-politics, the struggle east vs west,...

To my very surprise, my sister (I would have never expected) suddenly spoke out and pretty much said she had the same feeling that things were heading for worse. At first my parents (who are absolutely not in the doomtelling business, clearminded and feet on the ground yes, but no dramatic changes) did not believe we both had come to the same conclusion without influencing each other.

In the end we spent several hours talking over dinner and suggesting things on the topics of being self-sufficient, preparedness,... And ever since, I have even gotten my parents (which I could not believe where I not there) on the self-sufficiency track. (albeit slowly).

Since then, whenever possible I try to push to buy things in big quantities, to buy more tools, etc.

So far, we now have a steady supply of fresh water (we buy those big water reservoirs for on top of a water dispenser), 2 old fashioned iron cast pumps connected to underground rainwater collection tanks, 12 or so geese for eggs, hens and a cock for eggs and breeding, pigeons for breeding and meat, 4 turkey for meat, something called a pindaar (like a small turkey, but with a more beautiful feather coat than turkey's) also for meat.

Meanwhile on other food sources like grains we are better stocked than most will ever be, since we trade it as a wholesaler. So we usually have several tonnes of corn, wheat, rice, ... stocked

Biggest problem so far is convincing them in the security section. (They are completely anti-gun minded)

well, let's see what you guys and girls of course :) have to say!

greetz,

V.
 

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Built in...

I grew up with neighbors that had many wooded acres. We used to camp out for day's on summer vacation. We taught ourselves allot. Then explored different things.

Then Rambo came out. That put a different aspect on things. We started making weapons and setting up "booby" traps. Built home made forts and protected them. We even went on reconisence missions.( spying on neighbors ) One thing we found out real quick was if It's dark out and the house is well lit, you can stand right outside the window. If the house light isn't directly on you, they can't see you from inside.

I'm not too "prepared" but I have 17 acres and my house is on top of a nice knoll. Plenty of H20 available. The only thing I want is a still. If I can make my own alchol for running the generator and lawn mowers I'd be happy.
 

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performing monkey
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I have 17 acres and my house is on top of a nice knoll. Plenty of H20 available. The only thing I want is a still. If I can make my own alchol for running the generator and lawn mowers I'd be happy.
you might want to look into a wood-gas generator
 

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YourAdministrator, eh?
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Being prepared has been a "normal way of life" for me - mostly due to the influence of my grandparents. My grandparents were born in the 19-teens and they went through the Great Depression, the world-wars, alot of "skirmishes" and such. The stories they told me about making their own coffee (because it could not be purchased), about winters so cold that being outside would kill you, the skills they taught me (cooking, baking, sewing, carpentry) and such gave me the sense that things were bad - very bad - and yet they survived and thrived.

I have always wanted to live in such a way that my father grew-up in where running water was two-feet and a bucket, where heat was given when you swung an ax, where growing a small garden was larger than the land that my entire house is situated on ... that kind of living where money wasn't the requirement to survive - skills were what was required.

I would love to be able to live "in the good-old-days" .. but .. I can't so I will do what I can with what I have now.
 

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My husband is a hoplophile. So he got me into guns...

I've always been into having a lot of food around the house. And never running out of anything. While growing up, my parents would often let us run out of TP, flour, bisquick, beans... but they would just run out and get them the next day. I hated it. So when I moved out, I never let myself run out of anything. It slowly turned into stocking up.

I'm quite politically involved so I guess I just see what could happen. I'd rather be prepared for TEOTWAWKI and not need my preparations than be faced with TEOTWAWKI and be totally caught off guard.

Also, the novel "Patriots" woke me up more.
 

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In the Army I was into Long Range Patrols and Fire Support (Field Artillery). After retiring, I kept on backpacking. I enjoy 30-50 mile treks and living self-sufficiently out of a backpack.

After watching Hurricane Katrina unfold on TV and seeing everyone pointing fingers at one another, I went on the quest from BOB to full self sufficiency.

There is something satisfying with producing your own eggs, fruit and vegetables and learning skills forgotten to most.

Today I left the office early ( I work at home) and went and cut 2 cords of firewood. I don’t worry about the future. Plan ahead and have fun as you do. Don’t fear, tomorrow is a new adventure!

I enjoy sharing knowledge with my grown children and preparing a small productive piece of land to pass on to the next generation.

My favorite recent reading was LIGHTS OUT.
 

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I am a little teapot
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For me, it's just something that I've picked up an interest in. I don't know anyone that I know is into prepping. That said, most of my family and friends can hold their own quite well. I see the way the world is turning and I want to extend what I've learned and been taught. I'm a husband and a dad now and I want to make sure my family is always warm and dry and sleeping with full bellies.

I guess I just don't have much faith in "the system" and I want to be able to hold my own if the need should ever arise.
 

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military back ground,my upbringing and the general overall status of our country in the last 10 or so years...at least thats when i started seeing that the road we all were traveling was not good and that made me nervous and last but not least having a realitive killed in his own home by some idiot that took less than three hundred dollars worth of items.......




when you take um down ....take um down hard
my first sgt.preached to me.....
 

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My reasons for prepping are similar to Sgt. Doug's. More so a way of life then anything else. Both of my parents grew up in the country during the Depression. My father in the Appalachian region of NC and my mother in middle TN. My wife is from Rhodesia (what is now called Zimbabwe).....it is definitely a way of life for her!!!!
 

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I've always thought about things beyond what most of society thinks about ie. sports, sports and the Sunday Game. :congrat: I wondered how I would fare if the system let me down. When Hurricane Andrew hit it did. I thought I was reasonably prepared which I was however I wanted to be more comfortable and for a longer period of time. I started at that point and have grown from there. We lost power in Ohio from Hurricane Ike and were ready with a generator. We have also been snowed in at times and have been prepared for that. We weren't completely prepared for the grid going down across Canada, NY, Pa and Oh. a couple of years ago. This made me start thinking more about the system and becomming more independant of it. I also experienced the City of Cincinnati being locked down do to civil unrest a couple of years ago. That fuelled a need for a place away from the masses and more personal protection. Being prepared has become more of a way of life for me and does influence my decision making process more and more. I was a Scout and still am, Our Moto is: BE PREPARED!:2thumb:
 

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YourAdministrator, eh?
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I've always thought about things beyond what most of society thinks about ie. sports, sports and the Sunday Game.
I used to be a fan of "general TV" but not of "sports TV". I can't stand watching people play games - I would rather play it myself.
 

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I've always had being prepared in the back of my mind. Growing up in Florida, hurricanes were always a possibility. Now, as I've grown older, I've seen a few things--

  • Big changes - Fall of the Soviet Union
  • Civil unrest - LA Riots
  • Terrorism - September 11th
  • Reasonable Organizations getting ready - Big Data Centers in Corporate America AND their backup plans
  • Natural Disasters - Katrina
  • Tornadoes in downtown Atlanta
  • Economic Disasters - The loss of my really great job

Twenty years ago, preparedness was looked on as slightly kooky. Now, the business case for being prepared is amazingly strong. Being unprepared is just plain dumb now...
 

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I've always had being prepared in the back of my mind. Growing up in Florida, hurricanes were always a possibility. Now, as I've grown older, I've seen a few things--

  • Big changes - Fall of the Soviet Union
  • Civil unrest - LA Riots
  • Terrorism - September 11th
  • Reasonable Organizations getting ready - Big Data Centers in Corporate America AND their backup plans
  • Natural Disasters - Katrina
  • Tornadoes in downtown Atlanta
  • Economic Disasters - The loss of my really great job

Twenty years ago, preparedness was looked on as slightly kooky. Now, the business case for being prepared is amazingly strong. Being unprepared is just plain dumb now...
Gator Dude, that's an impressive list. Most of have been through all of that and then some. I have never added all of that up in my head, I just keep looking at what's infront of me. Change keeps happening and things seem less and less stable for all of us.:confused:
 

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In the winter of 06-07, we were at the grocery store and noticed that the packaging had shrunk while price did not. About the same time, I discovered SurvivalBlog.com and had my eyes opened to the fragility of our food chain. We've always had a garden but decided to expand. As we started growing more of our own food, a few chickens seemed like a prudent step. Every step we took led us to think about another step we should take.
We got a few goats and then thought about how we would feed and them and the chickens ( which we have 40 of now ) over the winter if our regular suppliers were no longer available, so we grew some hard red wheat over the 08-09 winter. We plan to add oats in the spring. These are only small plots of about 1500sq ft each, and with the 2000sq ft of corn, will give us enough grain to feed the animals and us, as well as save enough to plant next year.
So, it started out as just a way to avoid being caught off guard in the event of any unforeseen circumstance and has grown into a goal of becoming as self sufficient as possible. If you grow or raise most everything you need, you're fairly well prepared.
 

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UncleJoe - I have also noticed that the "bulk items" are no-where as large as they were in 1990. Not long ago I found some of my old-stash of pit-stick and even those packages are twice the size of the largest pit-stick that I can buy today at the local WallyWorld - and the ones at WallyWorld are currently double the price of what was stamped on the outside of the pit-stick from my stash.

I think that having a stash is kind of good because it allows you to see the differences that have happened in the last few years and it cements our belief that things are changing - and - not always for the better for the "little guy" ..
 

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OK, growing up my Grandmother and Father hammered preparedness into my head because they had gone through the Great Depression and WW2. They taught me how to garden, butcher, make soap, make butter and such.
What made me think about preparedness as adult was living through tough financial economic times, so I started there.
When 911 happened, I literally freaked out with anxiety. I didn't know how bad things would get afterward and I think I was in shock for months. I couldn't stop shopping and storing, good grief I was a mess!
I am in a much better place. DH and I have country property, we remodel, garden and feel well prepared for emergencies now and I try to help others prepare and learn skills, only if they are interested.
My siblings pretty much have no interest and some think it's stupid, but I never want to feel unprepared again like I did on 911, so their opinion, is just that.
I rotate and carefully use food that is stored and try not to overstock, I hate waste.
 

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I'm done - gone
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For me, it was way back in the 80's when we had the power go out because of a snow storm. Living in an all electric house ( stove,heat,etc) we were without stuff for days. I had a handicapped child and another in diapers. Well, after that I was determined not to be that helpless again. I switched over to propane gas stove for cooking. We put in a wood stove and I started stocking up on caned goods at sales at the grocery stores when school started every year.
So, basically I've expanded our pantry to where I can "shop" from my preps now, and stock up on things when there a good deal and I have coupons to save even more. We've moved over to our acres and have a pellet stove for heat. We're switching it over to solar to power it. We also have a generator to run the important stuff ( fridge,freezer,water). I'm learning to can foods. I've almost gotten the hubby to agree to get chickens (LOL), and I've got him thinking of how to put us in a root cellar for storage of course ;) We have a set of berkey filters and I hope to get a second set soon.
My goal would be as self sufficiant as possible so we could afford to pay all the taxes which I feel is coming and also to know where my food is coming from and to help lower the amount we'd have to spend on it.
I have to go slow and steady with the hubby as he's one of those folks who don't like to rush into things ( which is good cuz I am LOL) That way he's (we) are not overwhelmed with things to learn and adjust to and to deal with.

I just hope we have the time to get there.
 
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