Why is wheat so high priced?

Discussion in 'General Food and Foraging Discussion' started by keepitlow, Mar 2, 2010.

  1. keepitlow

    keepitlow Well-Known Member

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    Wheat skyrocketed to $12 to $24 per bushel depending on the variety a few years ago. But wheat prices have since come back down to earth on the spot market.

    Historical Charts of Interest

    The Silver Bear Cafe

    As of today, one 60 pound bushel of wheat cost $5.25, so the cost per pound is about 8.75 cents. OK, this is the price per bushel for large contracts on the commodity exchange. But even then, should a 50 pound sack of wheat jump from a pro rata $4.38 for 50 pounds up to $32 to $55 for 50 pounds as many bulk sellers retail the wheat for? That is a HUGE, HUGE markup. Bottom line...wheat jumps from .0875 cents per pound up to .64 cents to $1.10 per pound.

    Wheat Prices, Wheat Quote

    U.S. Commercial Bushel Sizes

    I can buy decent stone ground whole wheat for less than it cost to buy grain and grind it myself. But we have to remember this was how it was with many poor countries that the World Bank has taken under its thumb.

    Haiti for example. They used to be totally self sufficient rice producers then the US imports subsidized rice and their farms can't compete so go bust. They lose all rice production abilities and now are dependent on the US for its rice. Almost same scenario with Jamaica and their milk production.

    Trade and the Dissappearance of Haitian Rice

    Life and Debt | A Film By Stephanie Black

    Anyway, what is your take on all this? Is all this markup due to the trendy survivalists craze for wheat? Or are wheat dealers just trying to get in on the Wall Street / Big Bankers greed wagon?

    Thanks
     
  2. kogneto

    kogneto The Skeptic

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    Well there has been an uptick in prepping and survivalism. Check out your local Barnes & Noble and their sure to have a display presenting the Rawles book collection next to the Zombie Survival Guide.

    But I think it's a bit more complex than that. Maybe it's due to a push for a "healthier" society where wheat products are deemed the healthier option to white bread/crackers/beer.
     

  3. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    On top of that,
    The U.S. sold the remainder of it's wheat reserves last May.
    Last summer was cool and wet which made it difficult to harvest the winter wheat thus reducing yields.
    And the winter snows came in October which reduced the fall harvest in the mid-west.
     
  4. pdx210

    pdx210 Well-Known Member

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    everyone is in it for profit

    the commodity cost is the cost of the commodity only and doesn't cover brokerage costs, processing, storage, shipping, FDA required testing

    and supply Vs. demand
     
  5. Genevieve

    Genevieve I'm done - gone

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    I'm planning on buying a couple of buckets very soon, just to get ahead on my storage. Hopefully, this years crops will do well. Makes you realize just how dependant we are on the weather and the Farmer for our survival, huh? LOL
     
  6. kogneto

    kogneto The Skeptic

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    and the shipping companies, and the grocery chains, heck up here if there's even the slightest hiccup we feel it for weeks
     
  7. longtime

    longtime Well-Known Member

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    The current cost of wheat is 12.00 for 50# double bag HRW. Just stopped at Waltons and picked up 1000 #. A lot of the cost is shipping. If you can get it locally or are on the road, it's still relatively cheap. I don't think it will stay that way.
     
  8. Genevieve

    Genevieve I'm done - gone

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    well, I don't live in the midwest where theres a grain store on every corner LOL I have to buy it online and get it shipped *sigh*. The best thing I have around here is a sock factory! LMBO! I can get socks for like 8/$1 LOL
     
  9. Sonnyjim

    Sonnyjim Prepping

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    I have actually done some research into growing my own wheat at home mainly for self sufficiency reasons, fresh homegrown beer ingredients/bread, and it really is extremely simple to grow your own if you have land and a small ammount of time. If you don't have land obviously you can't but it may be a good thread if not already started as it is extremely simple to do if you even have enough room for even a 10mx10m garden.
     
  10. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    We have about 2000sf of winter wheat in the ground now. It's some where under the snow. I harvest it with a pair of 30" hedge trimmers. I also have a couple of 3' scythe's just in case the day comes that I can't get or afford gas.
    Last year I put about 40lbs in LTS and fed the rest to the chickens over the winter. Unfortunately the goats got into the last bucket I had. It was my extra seed in case of a poor harvest this year. :cry:
     
  11. longtime

    longtime Well-Known Member

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    Do you take vacations? I normally end my vacations by stopping by Waltons, just got back from snowmobling in Yellowstone and made a stop at Waltons.

    We don't have grain stores on every corner here either, unless you use feed stores, which I bet you have also. A lot of people use feed wheat, I don't however.
     
  12. Genevieve

    Genevieve I'm done - gone

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    no hun, no vacations lol we use that money for the preps and for fencing. we're trying to fence in a good amount of our 5 acres. and I was just funnin on ya lol I'm a tad leary of using the feed store. Isn't all that feed treated in some way? also, wouldn't that be good for planting? if it is, I may go that route some time.
     
  13. longtime

    longtime Well-Known Member

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    Again I don't use feed wheat, but a lot of people do get the wheat from a feed store. Look on this forum, they make a good case. I believe the wheat is not treated just not cleaned as much as for human grain.
     
  14. keepitlow

    keepitlow Well-Known Member

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    3 to 5 times that price in mid atlantic states.
     
  15. keepitlow

    keepitlow Well-Known Member

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    Bought 50 pounds of organic oat groats (FOR HUMANS / NOT FEED) from Canada for $60.

    Was very dirty, had rocks in it as well as mouse poop. And to top it off was rancid as hell.

    25 pounds of Amaranth...full of grit.

    25 pounds Quinoa, more grit.

    Before you buy in bulk, always test small batches.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2010
  16. Riverdale

    Riverdale Well-Known Member

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    Why is the price of wheat going up? Because of a wheat rust that is spreading through Asia at this time, causing shortages among people who normally eat wheat as their staple grain.


    The main difference between animal feed grains and human consumption grains is the number of times it is cleaned.

    ANY seed intended for planting is treated to prevent rotting
    AND SHOULD UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES BE EATEN.
     
  17. longtime

    longtime Well-Known Member

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    It's still expensive, but Emergency Essentials has all the supper pails on sale. I think the cost includes shipping with a 200# minimum, 45# HRW for $35. I use them all the time but have never bought grain from them. Still like Walton's but shipping is expensive.

    I use the Walton's wheat all the time, I do use a large sieve as I transfer from the bag to a kitchen container. All I get is a little dust and I pick a few green grains out, no rocks or mouse ****. Canada must be doing to us what we do to the rest off the world, export our garbage.


    Emergency Essentials - Be Prepared Emergency Preparedness Food Storage...
     
  18. kyfarmer

    kyfarmer Well-Known Member

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    Yep between the rust issue and world wide shortage's it will hit home hard soon. Look for a loaf of bread to double by the end of the year. I don't think there will be hard shortages here but the price and quality will take a hit for sure. If the public knew what was really put in the packaged crap we buy now. Look's like no one cares as long as it's on the shelf and handy.
     
  19. jpeter1978

    jpeter1978 New Member

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    Please Share

    I've personally found a local dealer (Cedar City, Utah) who sells 60 lb buckets of wheat for $20. If you've found a good deal like this, please share it here: LocalPriceMap. Thanks in advance!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 10, 2010
  20. Genevieve

    Genevieve I'm done - gone

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    I can't decide who to buy from.
    Emer. Ess, Walton's or Honeyville.
    EE and HV are almost the same price wise, but HV ships your order for $4.95 ( or something). Walton's is way cheaper ( $13!/50#), but then you'd have the price of shipping the poundage.
    I'd like to get another 100# put up. and soon.
    EE and HV have almost the same things food wise. They do have maybe one or two different items from each other, so I do business with each. I wait on the sale and coupon codes and such to try to get the best deals.
    Having to have stuff shipped to you sure does make it harder to say the least.