Where to buy low cost seeds in the winter

Discussion in 'Gardening and Agriculture' started by Molly, Dec 30, 2008.

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  1. Molly

    Molly Guest

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    Greetings all , new here.

    I realize that I need to buy seeds incase we need to go to our land in the near future.

    Organic would be nice, but with the ecomony now and no raises, nor any bonus money need to purchase them at the best prices.

    Does anyone have any leads in this area. I have not gone on line to look, just know the regular ones such as Burpee.

    Does anyone know the proper care of them until I would need to use them. We would be growing in a semi arid area of the midwest.

    We have a place, shelter, but the well is too far away, with no water delivery system in place, rough country, hard to get water to shelter because of deep ravines.

    I have many years of gardening experience, but this is a totally different situation. The deer population is high, and the other wildlife creatures will make growing an interesting learning curve.

    The books that have been mentioned in other posts will be on our reading list.
     
  2. Magus

    Magus Scavenger deluxe

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    google non-GMO seeds for heirloom grade,non mutagenic seeds.had a link but I lost it,sorry.
     

  3. Merlin

    Merlin Seeker of Knowledge

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    I would like you to take a look into seed savers for small amounts for the most part as for keeping the government keeps their dried seeds in big walk in deep freezers but normal freezers are to moist dark cool and dry is how we keep ours
     
  4. The_Blob

    The_Blob performing monkey

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    I've found that he best way to store seeds is to package them in paper envelopes or bags since they allow for good air circulation and don't sweat. However, any container will do, keeping in mind that humidity and lack of air circulation will cause mold, disease and prompt seeds to germinate prematurely. Film canisters for one aren't recommended as the plastic promotes humidity and stagnant air. The temperature should be cool to make longer storage possible-refrigerator storage will work if you can't find a naturally cool place. Be sure to write the date, name of plant and any growing instructions you are aware of on the envelope or package. This will come in handy when using the seeds a year or more later, and will be appreciated if you give the seeds to someone else.
    Store seeds carefully by placing envelopes inside large glass jars with a bag of silica or powdered milk. These products absorb excess moisture. Reuse the tiny bags of silica gel that come inside new shoes--dry them for a few minutes at a very low temperature in your oven. Alternatively, make a tiny package of powdered milk by pouring a pile into the center of a piece of breathable fabric or tissue paper. Pull the corners together and close it up with a piece of string or elastic to create a sachet. The best jars for storage are wide mouth mason jars used for canning. They have the proper airtight seal that is essential for long term storage. If you store the jars in a cool, dark place the seeds should last from a year to a few years, depending on the type.