wheat sold for animals

Discussion in 'General Food and Foraging Discussion' started by lotsoflead, Mar 3, 2011.

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  1. lotsoflead

    lotsoflead Well-Known Member

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    I went to a local feed store and bought 200 lbs of wheat that is sold for animals just to experiment with, I even called their comsumer dept for any info that wasn't on the bag. they told me that theirs wasn't processed for humans(which I already knew) but there was no pesticides or herbicides in it that would hurt anyone,animal or human. After winnowing it, I tried grinding some, the moisture content was too high, I put about 5 lbs at a time in the microwave for about 7 minutes letting it completly cool every 3 minutes.I figure that I got the moisture down to about 12%. I was going to use an extra bedroom and spread the wheat out on a tarp and just turn on the air conditioner for a few days and do a couple hundred pounds at a time, but i could see my wife was getting her panties in a knot when I suggested it so i used the microwave. This two hundred pounds cost me 52 dollars compared to over $200. for two hundred pounds when buying it on line. I'm not suggesting anyone do things this way but if anyone is short of cash, it's not a bad idea and it's better to eat than nothing. I have about a ton of wheat bought on line in the past 5 yrs, but I'm still going to lay away several hundred pounds of this and can always use it for seed.

    wheat,bread from the feed store and wheat from Honeyville. Honeyvilles is a larger wheat, but the bread taste the same.
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    here I'm winnowing the wheat, I done this 4 times from one bucket to another till I was satisfied that all the hulls were gone
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2011
  2. MrSfstk8d

    MrSfstk8d Well-Known Member

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    I think before trying it as seed, I'd like to know if it's GMO or even OP at all. Can you get organic wheat feed?
     

  3. lotsoflead

    lotsoflead Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to try to sprout some after it has been sealed in mylar with oxey absorbers for a few month. Personally, i think it's the best 50 dollars that i've spent in some time.

    I don't mean to offend, but I grew up in the country on dairy farms and never worried about anything being organic. I live in the country and pay attention to what i see going on in farm markets for the almighty dollar.
    My neighbors land is certified organic which means that he took a few samples of soil(his choice) out the the county agent and had it tested. He used the same manure, the same fertlizers and lime, spilled the same grease and oil on the land from machinery that we did. the only difference in his produce and ours that i can see is he can get more money from the city slickers by labeling everything organic, even the stuff he buys from us. His land won't be organic til 500 yrs after we're all gone just like our land.
    And when the SHsTF and people are begging for food, I don't think they're going to worry about it being organic or not.
     
  4. MrSfstk8d

    MrSfstk8d Well-Known Member

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    Well, I only worry about GMO and Open Polinated as far as producing true to form and strain stability. Have watched some alarming reports about GM stains 'scrambling' thier gene map, and the insterted lines of code moving around the gene map in sporadic ways. Basically, I'm worried about the reproduced product being able to 'multiply' in a dependable way. Post SHTF, I wouldn't be worried about tacking an additional 30% price tag for an Organic Certified label, but my seed being able to produce true to form, season after season. I'd have to agree that in a number of cases, Organic Certified is worth about as much as the paper it's written on. I recall a case a few years ago with Ben and Jerry's ice cream having to remove some of it's "totally natural" labeling verbage from certain products because, while the raw materials were sourced in OC methods, some of the things used in the processing were not, and the packaging itself contained preservatives.

    Again, I don't mean to offend. Sorry if it came off reactionary, just my concern from a small scale, home use, seed saver's perspective.
     
  5. OldCootHillbilly

    OldCootHillbilly Reverend Coot

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    Much a what be sold fer animals just isn't as processed as what be sole fer human consumption. Human wheat will be cleaner then animal wheat IE: the chaf.

    So if ya wan't ta spend a bit a time cleanin it, it be just as good as the other only lots cheaper.
     
  6. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    Yep. We get our wheat from the feed store. It's got some chaff and some dead insects but other than that, no difference. Wheat is wheat.
     
  7. SaskDame

    SaskDame Well-Known Member

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    After it has been through the microwave, or has been sealed up with oxygen absorbers, it is highly unlikely it will grow (ie: sprout). Most live things do not survive that, if it killed the bugs it likely killed the wheat germ.

    Color of that feed wheat is not as good as the milling wheat (for human stuff), so may not taste as good or have as high a protein content, or have some fungus or mould content not in the milling wheat (re: higher moisture). Check the local "certified organic" rules and see if the feed wheat for organically grown meat needs to be high protein, and mould and fungus free. Around here there are numerous so called organic certification standards and any one of them may or may not require feed/seed to comply with what you are wanting.

    For sprouts you likely want seed wheat, to make sure the germination rate is high, and organic to make sure it is not GMO or treated with some obnoxious chemical.
     
  8. BasecampUSA

    BasecampUSA Sr. Homesteader

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    The wheat on the left is hard red spring wheat. It is used for bread and gluten-rich baking. Higher protien content.

    The wheat on the right is soft white wheat. It is used mainly for pastries, cake, cupcake and pancake mix... etc. Lower in protien, higher in carbohydrate. Good for brewing "Weizen" beer! You could bake bread with it if you add gluten (you can buy gluten seperately)

    Nothing wrong with eating that wheat if it is untreated.

    I've got a big patch of hard red wheat growing here now.

    - Basey
     
  9. lotsoflead

    lotsoflead Well-Known Member

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    the wheat on the left is hard white from Honeyville, I store no hard red

    the wheat on the right is also hard white so i was told by the feed companies consumer protection dept.they said that they the don't process any soft white for animals as that's all they process for.(Blue Sead feeds)
     
  10. BasecampUSA

    BasecampUSA Sr. Homesteader

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    Sure looked like it from the picture...

    So if you don't use hard red wheat, are you sensitive to gluten?