What vehicle will survive an EMP?

Discussion in 'Vehicle & Transportation' started by gobeav494, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. gobeav494

    gobeav494 Member

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    I have a 1966 car, will this survive a natural or man made EMP and still work? Should I store an additional battery and fuses in a faraday cage? Thanks, in advance, for your help. I appreciate being a member.
     
  2. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    Depends on how close you are to the point of impact! :D

    A car that old probably doesn't have much in the way of electronics. As far as battery and fuses... I'd ask that question over in the "vehicles and transportation" part of this site.

    Welcome to the forum. Glad to have you with us!

    :)
     

  3. Tirediron

    Tirediron RockyMountainCanadian

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    Welcome to the forum, if your car is a stock in origonal condition north american model chances a pretty good that it would not be damaged by an emp, during the actual blast the condensor might load up and cause poor or no operation temporarily, now if it has been updated or modernized there could be potential problems.
     
  4. Dixie

    Dixie Well-Known Member

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    I have a car much older, 1930, what are it's chances of running after an EMP?

    I have a trailer that will carry all my "stuff" in case we have to bug out. Problem is, I can't ask my mechanic this question because he lives across the street. Not only is it just a little too close to home, it's not a subject I want to discuss off the forum.
     
  5. Tirediron

    Tirediron RockyMountainCanadian

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    Emps or solar storm blasts endanger electronics first, transistors , diodes capacitors to some extent.
    early vehicles 1963ish and prior. if in origonal condition, IE not updated with electronic ignition or an alternator(as oposed to a direct current generator) should not take any damage from an emp blast, exept for the possibility of the ignition condensor building up too much charge and causing temporary ignition interupt. make sure that these early engines have solid core spark plug wires, not modern suppresion core wires because the suppression core wires will break down very quickly under sustained use with point ignition.
    After about 1963 alternators came into common use in north america. these systems are more suseptable to charging system failure, because of the possibillity of diode bridge failure due to over voltage.(these vehicles would probably still run until the battery went flat IF the charging system was damaged) In about 1974 most northamerican manufacturer went to Electronic ignition, which contains transistors diodes and capacitors, an well as most having electronic voltage regulators. Around 1986 most manufacturers started using electronic fuel management systems (computer controled) with a common diagnostic system called OBD1 (onboard diagnostics 1)
    Contrary to what other members have posted I have seen actual modern (2005 and newer) ECM /ECU failure or shutdown malfunction caused by voltage regulator malfunction, so I believe that they will be highly at risk in a solar storm or emp situation.
     
  6. TimB

    TimB Member

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    Tirediron is right. From what I have read on the subject, pre-1974 vehicles without electronic ignition are a pretty safe bet with the condenser being the most suspect part. Diesels with mechanical fuel injection are considered to be the best bet. BUT some of the articles I've read suggest that newer vehicles will survive also. I don't think we'll know for sure until it happens. :dunno:
    Just to be on the safe side, I'm on the look-out for an older ('80 or older) Dodge truck to use as a daily driver and already have a point-type distributor on the shelf if needed. :D

    1930 what, Dixie? Inquiring minds want to know. :wave:

    Tim
     
  7. d_saum

    d_saum ExCommunicated

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    Ditto... Weren't they called horseless carriages in those days? :p Alas, the only vehicle I currently own is a 74 Chevy Nova.. not the best bug out vehicle.. but if I get a hold of another condenser as a back up (I guess I should get an alternator too?), it'd most likely survive otherwise. What about older diesel trucks?
     
  8. Dixie

    Dixie Well-Known Member

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    1930 what, Dixie? Inquiring minds want to know.

    Tim[/QUOTE]
    __________________


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    Hey Tim,

    It's an A Model. I had a 1976 Ford Granada and a 1977 Linc MarkV but after reading all the post, I doubted they would survive an EMP, so I sold them last year. I'm not comfortable talking to my mechanic about EMP's but I did have a chance to mention it to my brother today. He concurs that the A Model should survive in case of a needed bug out.
     
  9. HamiltonFelix

    HamiltonFelix Part Time Good Guy

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    Recent localized EMP story. A co-worker bought a new VW Passat. Drove across the country to visit parents. Lightning struck tree along driveway where the car was parked. Next morning his car was dead, as was his parents' somewhat older GM. Insurance company went back and forth with dealership where they towed the new VW. Eventually they decided to total the vehicle. Just too much electronics and no way to be sure it would be repaired OK. The wrote him a check and he bought a Toyota Matrix to drive home. The Parents' GM care had three processors replaced, engine, transmission and climate control I believe. But they did fix it. I haven't asked him the year of the cars. Just thought it interesting that one big nearby bolt of high voltage DC would total a modern car.

    BTW, I'm a Hydroelectric Operator. Our plants, as they were up to about 1970, would probably be recoverable after an EMP. Today's plants would be junk.
     
  10. d_saum

    d_saum ExCommunicated

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    Wow.. very interesting! I'd love to know the years of the cars if you can find out. :D
     
  11. TimB

    TimB Member

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    Cool car, Dixie. :beercheer: It may not be the fastest but from what my Dad tells me, they are dependable. :)

    Funny you should mention a Matrix. We had one towed in from the Interstate that had been struck by lightning while driving. Tech that had the car replaced several parts just to get it started. After getting it running, more damage was discovered (this not working, that not working, etc.). By the time everything was repaired, the adjuster said if they had known the extent of the damage to begin with (how could you know?) they would have totalled the car.

    Tim
     
  12. Dixie

    Dixie Well-Known Member

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    Thank you Tim, it is very dependable My dad bought it loooong time ago and it has passed down to us. I just wish we hadn't sold his sedan. It's good to know I have something that will run if the need ever arises.

     
  13. greenrider

    greenrider New Member

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    Motorcycle

    I have a Ural with sidecar and trailer with a Faraday cage over the Ignition system. I hope it will still operate after an EMP, and I can make it to my safety place. I can haul almost 1000 pound of cargo on it. Not fast, but steady.
     
  14. For what it is worth, last week near Houston, a friend's car was struck by lightening while he was driving down the Interstate. Fireball on the hood and everything. The car is a 2012 model. The engine kept running and he was able to make it to Houston. The car is of course fried, but it got him where he was going. Not exactly an EMP, but close enough.

    Relative to actual EMP's: based on the SCIF facilities I have designed and built, some with Faraday cages, my guess is a car's hood and the metal body around the engine will serve the same purpose as a Faraday cage.

    My $0.02
     
  15. Magus

    Magus Scavenger deluxe

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    Anything pre 80's for sure.1974 Ford bronco or a Jeep for sure!
     
  16. Tirediron

    Tirediron RockyMountainCanadian

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    I wouldn't bet my life on that.there are a lot of openings and long runs of wire to act like antennas. 32v from a welder will fry an ECU so the multi thousand volts from a emp/ solar storm would be a bit worse, lightning is directional not a wall of voltage.
     
  17. Tirediron

    Tirediron RockyMountainCanadian

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    The only concern here is have they been updated with electronic ignition etc, although the electronic ignition should be a lot more robust than full electronic control systems
     
  18. HamiltonFelix

    HamiltonFelix Part Time Good Guy

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    I had chance to talk to my friend again. The VW Passat that was declared a total was a 2003. And he says his folks' GM was similar vintage (I'd initially thought it was older). I guess it was just a few feet further away from the lightning strike.
     
  19. Buffalo444

    Buffalo444 New Member

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    M35 with a multi-fuel engine and an air stater. Pretty well covered then.
     
  20. zracer7

    zracer7 Prepper Padawan

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    Quick question. Considering the fact that I can't go out and get a pre1970s vehicle. If my 2007 f150 4.6 v8 were to get hypothetically hit by an EMP, what parts would need to be replaced to get it operational again?