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Reverend Coot
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, anybody given any thoughts on washin clothes in a situation?

I was thinking bout one a these:



Would be handy in the motorhome an if ya needed to do some clothe's in a emergency. Either this er a wash board, ain't sure I can get momma to do the washboard thing.

We got a creek real close ta the house, so as long as the water ain't muddy, that could be used fer wash water. The way the sales pitch reads, sounds like they would work perty good. Seen some in RV mags to, so just wondered what everbody thought or what yall plan on doin.
 

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The wanderer
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Done thought of that ourselves! MMM and I have been doing laundry this way, full time, for 7 years.


That's a hand-cranked wringer, too.
 

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I sold my soul to The_Blob. He had candy...
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On another site one lady had a 5 gallon bucket with a new plunger through the lid for an agitator then she used an industrial mop wringer to squeeze out as much water as she could. Just another thought.
 

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I invented the internet. :rofl:
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My wife posted the picture of how we do it here. One thing we learned right away was the value of a wringer. There're lots of ways to wash clothes but wringing the water out by hand is slow, tedious and A LOT OF WORK. It's very hard on your hands. Especially with jeans.

We've been known to put our clothes in a barrel half full of water and soap and drive into town (seven miles). Dump the wash water and refill with rinse water and drive home again. The clothes are clean and rinsed by the time we get home. Of course we don't do it just to wash clothes but if we need to go in anyway ... :D

If you're just looking at washing a couple things at a time like keeping current on the wash when camping the unit pictured will probably do fine.

Regarding washboards ... you're better off with a flat surface to lay the clothes on then work them over with soap and a scrub brush.
 

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www.veggear.blogspot.com
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I was going to suggest the 5g bucket with plunger. They make a special plunger built for washing, but a standard one works for me. They say 3 or 4 mins of plunging does the job. Greentrust.org has a couple god vid on youtube. He wrings the clothes placing the wet laundry into a bucket with some holes on the bottom. You insert your wash bucket (nest it) on top of the wet clothes and sit down on it to push out the water.

I looked into the little wonder washer and found a few bad reviews. One of those deal or dud shows gave them to a few camper and rv guys. No one liked it and a few even broke,
 

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The wanderer
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We wore out a few toilet plungers before we bought the metal "rapid washer" plunger in the picture above. The rubber on regular plungers eventually gives out from the use.

That's a double set of washtubs in my picture but you can only see one of them from this angle.

In the winter we use a 5-gallon bucket on the shower floor, plunge it with the metal plunger, then run outside and roll it through the wringer. We have clotheslines in the cabin near the woodstove, outside on a covered porch, and out in the back yard.

Even better than a mop wringer, for those who go that route, is one of those wringers gas stations had in the old days for the rags from washing windows. They really squeeze the water out.
 

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Partyin' like it's 1699
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If I didn't have 4 other people and myself to wash for, I'd already have a wringer washer. I've also considered purchasing clothing that is naturally antimicrobial and does not need to be washed often, like wool or hemp-but its so prohibitively expensive I can't do it right now :(
 

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The wanderer
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Yes, mosquito is married to sue!

By the way, in case anyone wondered...our place is called "mosquito mountain ranch", hence his name, mosquito mountain man!

Yup, can wash in a creek and use sand or rub clothes on rocks. Then spread the clothes over bushes or other brush to dry. The air can get to them from both sides that way. Don't even have to wring them out much that way.
 

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I'm done - gone
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We have the bucket and plunger set up set aside for the washing post shtf. We also have an industrial sized bucket with ringer. And a large galvanized tub for the bigger stuff like sheets and towels.
Staying on top of the laundry IMO would be something you'd want to do. Maybe a load a day. You can always hang it near the heating in the winter. You'd just have to add it to the chore list. I had planned to do it when I had finished the dishes in the mornings. The laundry could be soaking while I did the dishes and then I could finish the laundry up and get it outside early enough to dry in time. I mean, I'll be needing to heat water for the dishes, so might as well do enough for the laundry at the same time. lol
And really, if you think about it,most clothes don't get dirty all over ( unless you're a real clutz* raises hand* lol). Some things just need a quick wash and a good rinse. And if you use aprons, you can catch a lot of dirt and stains, making laundry easier. Coveralls would work good for the guys when they're doing something very dirty. And then that way you would only have one or two really dirty loads to do.
 

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The wanderer
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Well thought-out plan, Genevieve. Especially the part about heating all the water at once! Yeah! I've always liked aprons in the kitchen so I didn't have to worry about getting dirty, and I could whip it off in a minute and be presentable! The idea of coveralls for outdoor work is a good one! It would really save work in the long run!

When I do laundry I sort by cleanest to dirtiest. Underclothes go in the water first, run through the ringer and into the rinse tub. Then I work my way through until I get to the dirty jeans or grubby socks. I have two washboards but scrapped using them. I pin the clothes against the side of the washtub with my hand on the rim and scrub at stains with a brush. Same with socks.

In the winter, especially, things don't get real dirty. Just smelly after a while!
 

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YourAdministrator, eh?
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For me, if things got really bad, I will be going "back to nature" full-time. Skip the clothes, skin washes quicker anyway :sssh:
 

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I invented the internet. :rofl:
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For me, if things got really bad, I will be going "back to nature" full-time. Skip the clothes, skin washes quicker anyway :sssh:
You moving to a warmer climate?
 

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YourAdministrator, eh?
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Reverend Coot
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yall wanna be carefull wearin them sorta cloths Naekid if yer gonna be working around fire er movin parts!:eek:

Might just loose somthin ya wanna keep!

I think we might give the metal plunger one a try. Bout 16 bucks an won't take up alotta room with a wash tub what could be used for other things and a couple a buckets. I've already got one a the old gas station wringers so that be covered.

I found a recipe fer homemade dry laundry soap. Gonna whoop up a batch and see how it works.
 

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YourAdministrator, eh?
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Yall wanna be carefull wearin them sorta cloths Naekid if yer gonna be working around fire er movin parts!:eek:

Might just loose somthin ya wanna keep!
I haven't lost anything yet that I wanna keep. I don't think anything is worse than weldin' with flux-core'd mig-wire in the buff, or grindin' steel without guards in place in the buff - or even cookin' up some fresh bacon over a fire.

The only thing that really bothers me is when the skeeter's wanna make lunch outta me :eek:
 

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Reverend Coot
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Now thats a itch what be hard to scratch!:D
 

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The wanderer
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Hey, oldcoot, if that homemade dry laundry soap turns out any good, ya wanna share the recipe with the class? :D
 
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