Walkey Talkeys

Discussion in 'Communications' started by BigBertha, Dec 30, 2008.

  1. BigBertha

    BigBertha Guest

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    How many miles can modern walkey talkies go? How much would I expect to pay for one that goes 5 or 10 miles? Can the signal go up hills?
     
  2. URBAN SURVIVORS

    URBAN SURVIVORS New Member

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    well those little walkie talkies at walmart are line of site pretty much, but should go about a neighborhood block with some trees and houses ...even if they say 10 miles or 25 miles thats just not gonna happen as well as they want you to think. Now you may look into some that are marine band, those will go farther but will cost you about $75-$100 each so with that in mind, i would go to a place that sells alot of different kinds like radio shack or bass pro and tell the guys working that section what you want it to do.

    Ps: The marine band is better because there are not to many of them being used on land and heavy use bogs the reception down
     

  3. URBAN SURVIVORS

    URBAN SURVIVORS New Member

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    Walkie talkies

    I want to also point out that the cheaper walkies from walmart do have thier place....they are great for around the camp when you dont want the signal going to far so everyone in 5 miles hears you...so you may want to have a couple different kind around.
     
  4. ke4sky

    ke4sky ke4sky

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    Marine VHF prohibited for use ashore

    Please take time to read:
    FCC: Wireless Services: Ship Radio Stations: Operations


    Using Hand-Held Marine VHF Radios on Land - You must have a special license, called a marine utility station license, to operate a hand-held marine radio from land -- a ship station license IS NOT sufficient. You may apply for this license by filing FCC Forms 159 and 605 with the FCC. To be eligible for a marine utility station license, you must generally provide some sort of service to ships or have control over a bridge or waterway. Additionally, you must show a need to communicate using hand-held portable equipment from both a ship and from coast locations. Each unit must be capable of operation while being hand-carried by an individual. The station operates under the rules applicable to ship stations when the unit is aboard a ship, and under the rules applicable to private coast stations when the unit is on land.

    Prohibited Communications -- YOU MUST NOT TRANSMIT --
    False distress or emergency messages.
    Messages containing obscene, indecent, or profane words or meaning.
    General calls, signals, or messages on channel 16, except in an emergency or if you are testing your radio (these are messages not addressed to a particular station), or
    When your ship is on land (for example, while the ship is on a trailer). Voluntary boaters are not required to keep radio logs or keep a copy of the FCC's rules. Regardless of whether or not you have a copy of the rules, however, you are responsible for compliance.
     
  5. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Amateur Radio call sign KM4GDU

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    I agree the rules. they are the law. but in a real emergency or catastrophe I really doubt it would be an issue.
     
  6. Fn/Form

    Fn/Form Function over Form

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    It's one of those things you probably won't get caught at. However, there are reasons for it that we don't understand, and possible unintended consequences for yourself and others.

    Check out MURS. Maybe your marine radio is type accepted for that and can be programmed for it. The Standard Horizon HX370S may work... basically a great radio that's free after you consider the cost of the included rechargeable battery, charging cradle, AA pack, etc. I'm not sure how it can deal with the 2W restriction..
     
  7. RossA

    RossA Active Member

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    I've been asking this question for awhile myself. I never considered marine band. When the bad times come, licenses won't matter. Communicating will.
     
  8. ke4sky

    ke4sky ke4sky

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    DF'ing and fingerprinting rogue transmitters

    I can tell you from personal experience in assisting US Marshalls, FBI and local law enforcement in tracking spattering CB operators with illegal amplifiers causing interference with broadcast stations, taxicabs and other unlicensed radio users getting into amateur, marine or public safety bands, that if you use a radio illegally (in other than a real emergency) in most urban areas and interfere with a licensed user, your signal will be accurately located within 100 meters within about 30 seconds. The oscilloscope trace of your transmitter captured, with sufficient specificity to identify to stand up as evidence in court. If the licensed user subjected to your interference is a public safety, local, state or federal government, military, maritime or aviation station, the local authority having jurisdiction may not be the FCC. Uncle Charlie is more than happy to let the other kids in the neighborhood play.

    Even in a "real" emergency an illegal user can expect to have the vehicle I(if operating mobile) and the radio seized. The feds have no sense of humor on this sort of thing.

    The volunteer radio operator who operate our county's emergency technology support unit practice locating transmitters all the time. It is a game called "fox hunting." With GIS mapping software, software defined radios and computer controlled signal analysis software and remote controlled DF-ing receivers with rotatable directional antennas, it is really easy to do.

    Even doing it the old fashioned way with hand held radios, map and compass it doesn't take long if you have a bunch of folks who like to go out and do this just for fun. We track weather balloons for NOAA for practice.
     
  9. RossA

    RossA Active Member

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    There is no question that illegal operators can be located. I want some good battery powered radios (licensed or not) for the really bad times, meaning when cell communications are down, electricity knocked out, general lawlessness on the streets, etc. If the state of emergency is that bad, then a lot of licensed operators won't be operating anyway without electricity unless they have battery powered devices or emergency generators.
    Also, when the bad guys are running wild in the streets, I would suspect (but I can't guarantee) that there will be more pressing needs for LE than to look for me and my radio.
    Just a thought.