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I'm looking for a Basic Bread recipe that uses home ground wheat, honey, salt, and a simple yeast/sour dough. That can be cooked in say a Dutch Oven on the coals. This will be the most basic recipe that uses mostly what I consider the basics of storage, with no option of going to the store, because I forgot ......?
I have been grinding my wheat for a while and mixing it with white flour in most of my recipes with good results, but always think about the what if's, and am looking for the bare essentials for a home grown loaf of bread. I recently aquired about 300 lbs of older honey and want to use that instead of sugar. Thanks, Moldy
 

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Texan
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With those ingredients you listed you can make excellent bread, thats all it takes, anything else is extra.

Just add a few spoons of honey to a cup or so of water, add the yeast, while it is proofing put 3 to 4 cups of your whole wheat flour and salt in a bowl and when the yeast starts to foam pour it into the flour and mix it until all the flour is wet, you may have to add more water depending on the flour.

Cover the bowl, walk away and let the flour "soak" for about an hour, the more water the wheat bran soaks up, the softer and lighter the bread will be. If you dont let the whole wheat flour "soak" the bread will be denser and heavier. You may have to stir or punch down the dough if it rises much.

After about an hour, mix in enough white flour to make it kneed-able and follow your normal routine from there on, if the dough is the right consistency, then you dont need to add the white flour.

From my experience, "soaking" or allowing the whole wheat to hydrate is the secret to making light whole wheat bread and excellent bread can be made with only flour, water, yeast, and yeast food.
 

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I've been making this bread for about a month and it sure beats the old fashioned kneeding way. No kneeding at all. Pour the ingredients in, let it sit, shape and bake.
I've started making whole wheat and rye this way as well. Grinding our own grain too.
 

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I did a little experiment with the microwave, but this can be adapted to another form of "baking".

I used pancake mix or a general baking mix and made a thick dough. Shoved it into a microwave rice/oatmeal/anything cooker and came out re-markedly like bread; just without the crust.

It's actually very good, my family enjoys and requests it now. It's also very quick; around 5 minutes for a small "loaf" and 10 minutes for a larger one. Also added some cinnamon and raisins for raisin bread.

I did do a little kneading on one loaf but I think I over did it as it turned out like a rock, but I think a little kneading may help make it keep together more as the non-kneading method above causes a loaf that sort of crumbles as you cut.

Anyway, it's a quick, easy way to make something akin to bread and tastes pretty good.
 

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Can you use self rising flour to make homemade breads or, because of the yeast, it must always be all purpose?

(Sorry ... cooking has never been my forte!)

Thank you.
 

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What do you with the rest of the dough?

I've been making this bread for about a month and it sure beats the old fashioned kneeding way. No kneeding at all. Pour the ingredients in, let it sit, shape and bake.
I've started making whole wheat and rye this way as well. Grinding our own grain too.
After you cut off a grapefruit size piece of dough, what do you do with the remainder of the dough? Can you store it in the fridge and use the next day? How long will it keep?
 

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Yup weedygardgen you store the rest in the fridge in the same container. It lasts about a week.
 

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I sold my soul to The_Blob. He had candy...
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I've started making whole wheat and rye this way as well. Grinding our own grain too.
Do you make any adjustments in amount of flour or water when you use the whole wheat or do you leave all ratios the same? I am still trying to get the hang of switching whole wheat for AP flour.
 

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mdprepper...not really. Sometimes flour is a little dryer and it takes a little more water. It's fairly sticky dough. One thing I have done though is soak my flour with yoghurt or kefir added to the water to ferment it overnight. Makes the bread lighter and easier to digest. To the recipe add 1/2 to 1 cup yoghurt or kefir. So watch that last cup of water, you may not need all of it.
 

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I sold my soul to The_Blob. He had candy...
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:thankyou: cybergranny
 

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I sold my soul to The_Blob. He had candy...
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Good memory Andi. That is the same recipe I normally use with AP flour. It makes the best, easiest loaf of bread. It has a wonderful crispy crust and lovely soft inside. Fresh from the oven with real butter, there is nothing better!
 

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Well, you folks inspired me to bake. Just finished my first loaf and it is awesome. I did the recipe on the posted youtube vid. So easy. It came out a little dense but I think if I let it proof longer I can fix that problem. Thanks for the inspiration! Gonna bake my own once a week from now on. :)
 
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