Vehicle Safety

Discussion in 'Vehicle & Transportation' started by Todays Survival Show, May 2, 2010.

  1. Todays Survival Show

    Todays Survival Show Survival and Handgun Podcaster

    105
    0
    Automobile accidents seems to be a forgotten prep. Yet, it's one of the leading causes of death (if not the #1 cause.) However, I rarely see it discussed, blogged or posted on someone's list of survival preparations. If surviving is about avoiding death or injury, then why don't people spend most of their time preparing for what is most likely to threaten their life? Since car accidents is one of the most likely causes, why isn't this near the top of most survivalists' list? When I read people's summation of their preps I don't see much about, no texting and driving, slowing down 5mph, always looking 3 cars ahead, using turn signals (a lost art) keeping good quality tires on your car, making sure your vehicle is in good working and safe condition, avoiding multi- tasking while driving, no applying makeup or lighting a cigarette while driving, etc. Wearing seatbelts seems to finally be a given, but nothing else about vehicle safety has become as compulsory as seatbelts. A defensive driving course after you've gotten a ticket, just isn't enough in my opinion, your thoughts?
     
  2. allen_idaho

    allen_idaho Well-Known Member

    348
    0
    I always figured it was pretty common sense. No real preparations needed. Although I do keep my vehicles very well maintained.
     

  3. GreyWolf

    GreyWolf Well-Known Member

    58
    0
    Good point. Back in February I did encounter one situation that brought to light a problem with a friend's vehicle preps. The friend drives a late model Chevrolet Malibu. He keeps tools, jumper cables, a quick strt device, small 12v air compressor and more stuff stored neatly in the trunk of the car. After doing some shopping for a few items we returned to the car to find that the battery was dead. It wasn't until he went to retrieve the items from the trunk that he realized there was no external key lock for the trunk lid. As the lock was powered by the battery all the preps he had made were inaccessible to him. After receiving boost from someone he immediately popped the trunk and got the quick start charger and cables just in case. It's important to look for the flaws in your plans and spot potential problems with your preps. He did find a small place under the hood to secure the start charger.
     
  4. Todays Survival Show

    Todays Survival Show Survival and Handgun Podcaster

    105
    0
    Good point GreyWolf, I guess my main point is that the chances of a car accident threating your life is FAR GREATER than any natural disaster, violent encounter, terrorist attack, EMP, etc., etc. Yet some people spend more time preparing for the unlikely stuff and neglect the likely stuff. A few more thoughts on this subject: Good first aid supplies in my GHB and some tools to help repair my car are part of my vehicle safety preps, also making sure I've always got good tires on the car, making sure it's well maintainted even though it's a well used car, staying armed to fight back a carjacker, slowing down a little bit, using turn signals, avoiding texting or talking when driving, knowing my route in advance to avoid unnecessary or quick turns or turnarounds, avoiding the stress of getting lost and making a dumb decision, knowing how to drive in all types of inclement weather, snow, sleet, hail, heavy rain, etc. Those are some of the preps I suggest. Sure, there's nothing we can do to prevent a drunk driver from hitting us, but with good situational awareness perhaps we can prevent a lot of other accidents and events from happening while driving?
     
  5. Woody

    Woody Woodchuck

    3,347
    25
    Preparing for an auto accident is pretty hard. What Kind of accident, front, side, rollover? Vehicle troubles sure, you can carry the basic gear to be prepared.

    As far as the others you mention, no texting, slow down... that’s right up my alley, I hypermile. I can milk over 50 mpg out of a vehicle EPA combined rating of 32.5 mpg. I am very aware of what is going on way in front of me, coming up behind me, lights, turns, you name it. Sure, it takes me a little while longer to get somewhere but I am much more relaxed when I get there, feel much safer because I know what is going on around me and save a lot of cash in the process.
     
  6. kogneto

    kogneto The Skeptic

    280
    0
    two words: bumper cars

    lol just kidding but still important stuff, keeping a toolbox (with unique tools specific to your vehicle like torx screwdrivers), as well as the safety items is good too, maybe some extra light bulbs (I got out of a ticket once because I was fortunate to have a spare in the car)

    don't forget keeping an extra calm mind in case of an accident, very easy to lose if there's major damage
     
  7. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

    8,000
    10
    I wanted to wait a little bit before putting in my thoughts on vehicle safety and the things that we, as part of the general population can do to protect ourselves and stay just within the confines of the DOT regulations.

    Not everyone can go out and purchase an ex-Nascar vehicle which are considered some of the safest designs out there, but, we can take many ques from a Nascar vehicle and implement them into our own basic daily-drivers.

    Lets assume that you have a standard run-of-the-mill sedan. If you strip the interior out of it till all you have is just a driver's seat and steering wheel, you will loose-out on all the reasons you purchased that car. Many cities and small centers have some kind of race-shop. Bringing your stripped-down car to one of those shops will allow them to install a full cage inside the car with the seats tied to the cage and the seat belts also tied to the cage. Put your carpeting back in, slip the headliner in, wrap the bars with padding and you have yourself a basic "ralley car" with extra protection for the people inside the vehicle.

    You can go external on the protection by wrapping the body of the car with heavy-duty bumpers, side guards and tie them together with a jungle-gym of tubing to create what is known as an exo-cage. The cage then takes the initial impact which will then slowly transmit the impact energy to the body-work which will then slowly transmit the impact energy to the cabin and finally to the bodies inside the cabin.

    Personally - I like a combination of the two levels where they compliment each other without looking "over-the-top" where they draw attention from passer-bys.

    Picture attached of an internal cage inside a GrandCherokee with the interior put back in as well as a different GrandCherokee running an Exo-cage. Both systems very functional and the ideas can be implemented into virtually any DOT-legal vehicle.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. kogneto

    kogneto The Skeptic

    280
    0
    hey naekid do you know the average cost of the inside setup you posted? exo-cages are cool, but draw too much attention for my liking
     
  9. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

    8,000
    10
    There are many variables that need to be factored into the costs of building a cage. The first variable is the cost of the material. A quick mini-cage (like for a pickup truck) would use 1/4 the material of a cage to fill up a vehicle like a Suburban.

    Next variable to factor in would be the time to measure, bend, weld and then gusset everything - mount the seatbelts and seats, etc.

    Finally paint, padding and reinstalling the interior.

    Now, with that being said, a simple cage tied to the frame of a pickup might cost $500 to $1000 and an extensive cage might be in the vicinity of $2500. The tubing that will be required is called DOM or Drawn Over Mandrel that needs a special bender to form. The tubing is fairly expensive (compared with gas-pipe which is fine for tube-bumpers) and the benders are between 4 and 6 times the price of a hydraulic gas-pipe bender.

    This makes the process something that the average guy just can't justify owning the equipment to do a "one-of", but, a shop will be able to justify it if they can build a few cages per month for customer's rigs.

    I have a gas-pipe bender to make bumpers, handles, body-guards but, I would never trust gas-pipe to protect my noggin in case of accident inside my vehicle.
     
  10. emclean

    emclean New Member

    1
    0
    a thought for your friend, if he has foldign back seats, loading jumper cables in through the seat, alows you to acess them the same way, with out opening the trunk.
     
  11. TimB

    TimB Member

    446
    1
    I hope that spare tire is tied down in that Cherokee. ;) Which brings up the thing I see the most of when working on cars/trucks- don't keep a lot of junk (particularly heavy items) in the front or back seat, floorboard, or console. Even a small item that weighs enough can become a lethal missile in a violent accident. :(

    Tim
     
  12. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

    8,000
    10
    Tim,

    That is the reason I like products like Raingler nets that you can use to seperate items that are not contained from the occupants of the vehicle.
     
  13. sailaway

    sailaway Well-Known Member

    1,922
    0
    I hold a Class A CDL and don't plan on loosing it. I will no longer text anyone while driving, including Mrs. Sailaway.
     
  14. Todays Survival Show

    Todays Survival Show Survival and Handgun Podcaster

    105
    0
    I agree, I won't even text anyone while driving. Another one that get's too me is people reading the newspaper while driving in rush hour. I've actually seen it happen many times! But I will podcast while driving...sorry but had to confess that. :)
     
  15. Jason

    Jason I am a little teapot

    2,696
    4
    The best BOB or GHB, let alone all the other preps and equipment that a person may keep in their vehicle, won't do anyone any good at all if they are scattered all over the highway after a wreck. Being prepped with the tangible stuff is great, but when it comes to driving, intangible preps are at least as important. Many points have already been hit on in this thread-look ahead while driving, stay off the da*% phone, don't drive like a maniac, etc. Also, keep your vehicle maintained and do a much of the work as possible yourself so that you are familliar with the workings of your ride so you can fix or at least jerry rig it enough to get you home-or even just out of the traffic lanes-if your vehicle does let you down.

    Remember-anything mechanical will eventually fail.