USDA Reports Food Shortages

Discussion in 'International Current News & Events' started by UncleJoe, Jul 2, 2010.

  1. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    Several recent headlines indicate that food prices will continue their swift climb upward. These troubling new reports show that agriculture production and stored grains are critically low and experts are now predicting food shortages.

    Look at a few of today's mainstream headlines: Drought threatens global rice supply in the India Times; VA farmers say heat taking toll on crops, Associated Press; Severe food shortage follows lack of rainfall in Syria; and, finally, Corn prices bolt as USDA downsizes crop estimates, which states that, "Commodity professionals were caught off guard Wednesday by a U.S. Department of Agriculture report showing 1 million fewer acres of corn planted this year than earlier projected, and almost 300 million fewer bushels of corn in storage." And these articles don't begin to address crops being damaged by the toxic rain from the Gulf oil disaster.

    We are back to recession economics and rapidly heading toward a deeper, longer “Third Depression.” With all recent economic indicators setting new record lows and deficits at record highs, this ship is only going one way folks, down, down to Chinatown. This WTC-Building 7-style-controlled-demolition of the U.S. economy has long been engineered by the borderless banksters and will likely continue to collapse at the rate of free-fall gravity. With all of the manufactured confusion it may be difficult to know where best to invest your limited assets, but it seems to be clear that Food is on the march.

    Depressions are caused when capital is removed from the economy and that large sucking sound you hear is your money being vacuumed out of your pockets into the banksters' coffers. The shakedown went like this: they bet big, got fat, then lost thousands of times more than everything real on earth combined, then representatives of the serfs gave them all of the serfs’ money they need (including bonuses) to re-stimulate the economy.

    Well, our money is NOT flowing back into the economy as promised, and it will not be flowing back into the economy anytime soon. With nothing but crumbs left for the peasants, deflation is happening to durable goods and paper assets (of which real estate has become), while the cost of human necessity is rapidly inflating.

    There were several trend forecasters and financial firms predicting upwards of $200/barrel of oil before the Gulf oil gusher. The “analysts” said this would occur because of the perception of scarcity and a weakening dollar. The oil disaster and the subsequent outrage at Big Oil will surely take care of selling the perception of scarcity, while the Federal Reserve and Congress will surely take care of weakening the dollar.


    We’ve seen this Beta test before when oil prices reached their peak of $147 in 2008 sending the price of food to the stratosphere. Food staples like rice nearly tripled in six months and at times increased 50% in just two weeks primarily because of record oil prices and a weak dollar in 2008. During this run up on prices, big box stores like Sam's Club and Costco were rationing the number of bags of rice customers could buy. You can bet that Food Crisis Beta 2.010 will be far more severe.

    This third factor of actual Food Scarcity, coupled with high oil prices and a feeble dollar, will multiply the severity of increasing food prices. Whether this scarcity is being engineered to further cull the population or is a genuine imbalance in supply and demand is not important. The fact is that this reality that is playing out in the matrix and this triple-threat to food costs creates an opportunity for the serfs to soften the recessionary blow, and perhaps offer some economic freedom.

    You don’t have to be an “End Times survivalist” to believe storing food is a pragmatic practice. Everyone with expendable cash can and should design a good food storage and rotation system and buy bulk food as an investment. Many rationalists are touting guns, ammo, and gold as good small-scale investments given the despicable agenda unfolding in our matrix. Certainly those are critical investments in an economy dwindled to the rationing of necessity, but not everyone is into guns or can afford bundles of gold. And gold, at the end of the day, can only be traded for necessity.

    These recent food alerts seem to indicate that food may be the best short-term investment for the “Average Joe.” It's simple, if the retail price of rice doubles as it did in 2008, then you (the investor) make 100% return in something that's immediately tangible. It’s time to pay the tax penalty to cash out your mediocre "I-bought-in-to-the-American-Dream" 401K and invest in Food!

    Activist Post: USDA Reports Food Shortages: Wall Street 'Caught Off Guard' by Severity
     
  2. mdprepper

    mdprepper I sold my soul to The_Blob. He had candy...

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    :2thumb: Great article. I think I will copying it in to an email to all my friends/family that think I am crazy for all my food preps. Maybe then they will listen.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2010

  3. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    Go shopping, everyone. Food will be worth more later than the cash you stash today. Not that you should spend every dime, but don't keep putting it off.
     
  4. Littlebit

    Littlebit Well-Known Member

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    :melikey: Good stuff. Thanks
     
  5. Aemilia

    Aemilia Zookeeper

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    We are going shopping Monday, and we are buying extra. Time to comparison shop and (hopefully) double buy non-perishables on the list. This way we have extra foods, and its the food we eat. (We don't have beans & rice often here. Yet...)

    Thanks for the great information!
     
  6. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    Aemilia, the old saying is to store what you eat, and eat what you store. You already have some rice and beans stored, which will help stretch your food if something happens. Now it's time to stock up on the fruit cocktail, canned meat, pasta, canned sauces and cream of "whatever" soups, spices, whatever you guys like to eat.

    Have some "transition" treats for the kids (and for you and your husband) to ease things if you end up having to eat out of your storage. Things like Hot chocolate mix, Tang mix, candies, jello and pudding mixes (and instant milk powder. In pudding you can't really tell it's powdered milk).

    It's not a bad thing that your family doesn't eat much rice and beans right now. It means that you'll still have that stuff when everything else is gone!

    And believe me, when the rest is gone...you'll be really GLAD you stored that rice and beans.
     
  7. Littlebit

    Littlebit Well-Known Member

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    Rice has already gone up in price here. Beans and split peas are starting to creep up slowly. I plan on adding some more to my stock this month before it gets out of range. I order one pound bags of each spice from a site called the spicebarn.com They have a large selection and the prices are good. They even have the whole leaf if you prefer that. Beans and rice need some tender love and care when cooked and with the right spices your good to go. :D
     
  8. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    Beans and rice are almost limitless in the variety of things you can make with them. Among other things, during a really lean time in the '90s we made "beanloaf" with pinto beans, using the cooked, mashed beans in place of ground beef and adding a beef bouillon cube, and then following the meatloaf recipe. We didn't try to fool ourselves, we sat down to eat it acknowledging that it was made with beans and therefore a different food, and it was delicious.

    It doesn't take a lot of imagination to cook with them, just enough ambition to do so, because it does take longer when you start with dry beans. So many people are lazy cooks, they want the already-cooked & canned stuff, or even the ready-to-eat frozen stuff.

    There's tons of recipes out there, if you don't know how to use rice or beans, dig around on the internet (which you obviously know how to use if you're reading this! lol) and write down ones that use ingredients you already know you like.

    Even better, try some of them out now, while your diet doesn't depend on it.

    The Dollar Tree store here has one pound bags of pinto beans and kidney beans for $1.00. Best price I've seen around here other than Costco at $13-something for 25 lbs. of pintos, and Costco doesn't have kidney beans.

    What to do with beans? Here's a quick "beans 101":

    Red or Kidney beans: CHILI! (Yum!)

    Pinto beans: Cook and mash mix with salt, onions and garlic (optional but delicious: some fat or oil)...tada! Refried beans!

    White beans: Baked Beans! (Delicious! Even better cooked slow in a cast iron kettle!)
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2010
  9. horseman09

    horseman09 Well-Known Member

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    Gypsysue, yup. Beans are delicious, versatile and very nutritious. I am a bit wary of consumables from the Dollar-type stores, tho.

    On another note, it is surprising and disturbing to my wife and me that so many families don't cook much anymore, particularly meals, like ham and beans, or ham, taters and green beans, where a little planning might have to take place.

    The demise of the family dinner table is yet another tragic American story.:(
     
  10. Emerald

    Emerald Well-Known Member

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    Little off topic here but you can also make a great bean dip with white beans... it is almost like refried beans but you use nice Italian spices like oregano and basil and garlic and onion.
    Just cook your white beans and blend/mash to the consistency you like and then add the Italian spices/herbs and then if you have it some nice fire roasted bell or frying peppers and chopped tomato and serve with pita chips or even toasted french bread rounds(or corn chips) It is almost like hummus, but no tahini.
    We have even put a bit of nice shaved Parmesan cheese in there, it is good hot or cold, and on pizza crust instead of sauce and topped with mozzarella cheese baked up nice.. Can't tell we like to chow down here can ya? lol:D
    Back on topic-
    I do worry quite a bit over the rising costs of foods. Look what happened with the oil prices spiked, the food cost went up and the really didn't come down that much. Being able to buy bulk items and know what to do with them once you have them will put you ahead of the pack. I can't tell ya how much we have saved by my baking all of our bread stuffs instead of buying them.. in just one week we went thru 2 batches of flour tortillas (16 to a batch) if I had to buy them it would have been $1.79 for 10 at the store ($5.37 for 30). One batch of dinner rolls (16 per batch) about $2.99 at the store. Two loaves of wheat bread at $2 a loaf at the store. this is just an average of what I make, some week less some weeks much more, I have even made my own corn tortillas. So we used to spend close to $12.50 a week just on bread and now we spend only about $6.50 for 25 lbs of flour and just a few dollars more for yeast by the lb( the flour lasts about 6 to 7 weeks and the yeast much much longer). Just one weeks worth of home made breads pays for the bulk purchase and we eat for another 4 to 6 weeks for what it costs to cook it.
     
  11. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    Emerald, thanks for the ideas. Can you give us the recipe for corn tortillas? I have one for wheat tortillas.

    Horseman09, I'm troubled now. I was thinking of buying some of the kidney beans from the Dollar Tree. Why are you wary? I can get them though our food co-op for $26 for 25 lbs., but I have to drive to a different town to pick them up ($6 round trip in gas). What would you do, and why?
     
  12. horseman09

    horseman09 Well-Known Member

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    gypsysue, there have been some published issues regarding those types of stores.

    For example, they had unknowingly sold Colgate Toothpaste to consumers here in the states that was made under license in S Korea. Nothing wrong with that except that SK has no flouride in any public water supplies. Soooooo, SK-manufactured Colgate Toothpaste has a high level of flouride which has real potential for permament tooth damage to kids here in US who take flouride sups and have it in their drinking water and would have used that toothpaste regularly.

    There was never any inference that the Dollar chain in question had done anything deliberately improper, but they buy their products as salvage, surplus, sometimes as seconds and from overseas sources that?????????

    That's fine for toilet paper or cleaning products, but my wife and I are leary of the discount store consumable products unless we know they were manufactured by a local company. For example, a local Dollar Store sells a brand of potato chip (Middleswarth) that is made in only one factory, and that is in SE PA. As long as the date is good, the wife will buy them there.

    As for other food stuffs such as beans, rice, most canned products, etc, we prefer to buy consumables marked "Made in USA" when we can. Some foreign countries use (legally or not -- can you say CHINA) pesticides and herbicides that we can't even buy or possess here in the States.

    The wife and I aren't rabid about this sort of thing, but if we have a reasonable choice, we try to err on the side of safety not only with food, but other things as well.

    Our kids are still laughing about me grouching at my wife yesterday morning. The whole gang was here for breakfast and my wife kept reaching over the microwave (it was on) to get stuff out of the cupboard. Finally, I grumped, "Will you PLEASE stop microwaving your boobs!" Everyone was roaring with laughter. It probably is not a danger, but is it possible that low levels of radiation leak from microwave ovens? The damned things are all make in China. If they have any leakage, and a woman leans over the darned thing every morning to get stuff out of the cupboard, can it increase the risk of breast cancer? I don't know, but it is sooooo easy to just not do it.:(

    As I sit here in front of the computer on this beautiful 4th of July, my wife is calling me "Mr. Safety" with a generous dollop of sarcasm. :D Shortly after the microwaved boob incident yesterday, I went to a neighbors farm to help put up hay in his hay loft. I came back in very short order with an ankle swollen to the size of a cut-in-half grapefruit. So, I'm sitting here in front of the computer with an ice pack on my elevated, greenish blue, bulbous ankle.

    Yup. That's me. Mr. Safety. :eek:

    Gypsiesue, MMM and all the rest of the prepper gang, have a wonderful 4th of July, and to our Canadian prepper friends, Happy belated Canada Day.

    Mr. Safety, signing off. :wave:
     
  13. Emerald

    Emerald Well-Known Member

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    I've actually done the whole make my own masa from the whole corn(that I buy for the chickens) and boil it with the pickling lime and then rinsing and taking the outer hulls off and then grinding it, that did make fine tamales and tortillas but was lots of work and something to do for big special meals. It is nice to know how it is done so that if I need to I can do it from scratch.
    But the lazy in me came out and I just buy the instant masa by Maseca or by Masa Brosa and it is very easy.. just two cups of the ground masa flour and about 1 1/4 cups hot water. I also like a few pinches of salt (if I had to guess about 1/4 or a tad more salt) mix the hot water into the masa flour till just absorbed.(some days due to humidity it takes less water some days more) I knead it for about 2 minutes till nice and uniform and then I let it rest for at least 30 minutes. Then I split it into about 16 equal portions and roll them in to little balls and then I squish them in the tortilla press (which I got at a yard sale for $2 and it is electric which will cook them, but I have used it just as a press and cooked them on my griddle) using a cut up ziplock bag as a liner, carefully peel them off the plastic and put them on my griddle(if you have an electric one set it to 450 or even a bit higher) cook them for about 30 seconds on that side, flip them over and cook for another 30 seconds and then back to the first side for about 20 to 30 seconds, I like them a bit browned, so I tend to let them sit some times just a bit longer.
    I also like them just like that hot from the griddle with a bit of meat and cheese or even just a dab of butter... Very yummy fresh.. I also stack them and let them kinda steam and when cool I wrap and put in the fridge, I'm not sure how long they store that way as we tend to eat them right up within a few days.. I have also fried them in a bit of hot oil for crispy tortillas and they are yummy that way too..
    When the busy holiday weekend is over I might get the whole process written out better and put it in the recipes. Pickling lime is easy to get during the harvest season and not too expensive, and processing your corn this way opens it up to make the nutrients more digestible, and is not too bad of a thing to know for the hard times that might just be around the corner.;).. also a good way to use up field corn to keep from starving.
     
  14. Emerald

    Emerald Well-Known Member

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    I was typing as you were posting Horseman and you have made a valid point about Dollar tree, I don't usually buy any foodstuffs there and try not to buy too much of the "made in China" stuff either. But by law they have to have a label on food stuffs on where it was grown/made etc... So reading labels really pays off.. I am a "rabid" label reader and try to stay away from many things that have tons of stuff in the ingredients lists... You are better off buying stuff with only a few things in the list instead of a bunch of things I can't pronounce. Just check out an Ice cream label some days!
    I also try to buy things that are grown in my own state first, Michigan has a few companies that produce beans and while about a buck more than other beans I feel better buying from them.
    Also they found all kinds of nasty stuff in Colgate tooth paste like they did in the baby formula and the nestle cocoa milk mix that was made in China, and while they claim that none was sold here, Who really knows? I try to buy US toothpaste and shampoos etc... but if I had to get rid of stuff from china in my home, I would lose all my cooking utensils and much more.. probably have to a bit nekked too!:eek:
    I also try to grow more of my own dry beans but I would have to have more garden to grow enuf for us to survive if it comes down to that. But then we would have more time for garden if power goes wouldn't we!;)
     
  15. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    I checked, and the Dollar Tree kidney beans are from the Kelley Bean Co. of Morrill, Nebraska (Kelley Bean Co. - Dry Beans & Seed Since 1927, growing and selling beans since 1927.

    It's a good point to see where these consumables come from. I'd have never thought to check without horseman's warning (Thank you!). From now on, I always will.

    We grow a different dry bean each year, just to keep in the "know how", and this year it's pinto beans, last year it was white beans, year before it was red beans.

    But we were looking to put back extra, since beans have a long shelf life. We bought pinto beans at Costco. I think I'll go ahead and order the kidney beans from the co-op but I think the Dollar Tree ones, in this case, are probably okay.

    Toothpaste? *shudder* We buy Tom's of Main toothpaste, but would use something likie baking soda before I'd use Colgate or anything like it. Same with deoderant, shampoo, etc.

    Geez, all the chemicals in the things we eat, breathe, apply to our bodies, clean our homes and clothing with...it's amazing we do as well as we do.

    By the way, thanks, Emerald, for taking the time to share all the tortilla information!
     
  16. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    On the Kelley Bean Co. website (see last post) they have a "bean cam" focused on a bean plant. You can check it to see how it's growing. Right now it looks like the sun is shining. I'll have to look after dark and see if this is a live cam feed! If so, there's no wind right now! The plant isn't moving!

    Who'd have thunk? A bean cam...
     
  17. horseman09

    horseman09 Well-Known Member

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  18. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    :) And by the way, I forgot wish you a Happy 4th of July/Independence Day in return!
     
  19. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    The best BBQ chips in the world! I grew up with them and it's the only brand I buy. They're made about 8 miles north of my sister in Middleburg, Pa.
     
  20. horseman09

    horseman09 Well-Known Member

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    Emerald, I've never heard of masa, but by golly it sounds good. Does it taste anything like grits?

    UncleJoe, absolutely. We just had a party size bag of Middleswarth BBQ on the picknik table today. None better.

    Emerald, UncleJoe, Gypsiesue, MMM and the rest of the gang............HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!