Prepared Society Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
638 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
People are using knives and baseball bats to defend their homes from armed bandits. Image that you would have thought that in a country where only the army and police can go armed, things should be peaceful right. If this is not a perfect example of only outlaws having arms, because the average citizen cannot. Take that you scummy anti gun lib but biters. :congrat:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,240 Posts
Take that you scummy anti gun lib but biters. :congrat:
You tell'um KY. You are absolutely right. Can you imagine anything more terrifying than having a gang of thugs busting in your door and you are not armed -- and you have absolutely no way of defending your family?

Anti-gunners be damned. They are not getting my weapons -- assuming I had any. :) No purchase necessary. Not valid in some states. Must be 21 or older to qualify. See my 158 SJH between your eyes to qualify
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Machetes, meat cleavers, axes: Cairo's new neighborhood watches

Cairo, Egypt (CNN) -- As curfew kicks in, young men carry sticks, swords, machetes, meat cleavers, axes -- anything they can find to arm themselves.

They come out en masse, set up makeshift checkpoints and guard access to their neighborhoods.

Children carry knives longer than their forearms. The kids wave down cars and peer in warily. They are among the youngest members of neighborhood watch groups that have sprung up across Cairo.

With their country teetering on the brink of the unknown, these residents have taken security into their own hands. Many haven't slept in days. The official police force is nowhere to be seen, say many witnesses.

One of the main roads through the capital -- Pyramid Road leading to one of Egypt's most historic sites -- resembles a battlefield rather than the popular food and shopping stop known to Egyptians and tourists. Windows are broken, awnings hang in tatters, stores that survived the various rampages remain shut, their windows white-washed or covered in newspaper.

This is not the capital that millions across the world would recognize; nor is it one that many residents want the outside world to see.

While the demonstrations at Tahrir Square speak to an era of change, the rest of Cairo speaks to the broader repercussions of demanding that change. Lines extend at popular bread factories amid fears of a food shortage.

As CNN films from a bridge nearby, people standing in line gesture for us to stop. A child picks up a rock.

"Why are you filming this?" a man shouts. "Is this a nice image? It's ugly!"
He threatens to break our camera. That same anger and frustration is felt throughout the city, especially toward the news media. The rage has intensified among those away from the demonstrations -- some say the news media is showing distorted images of Egypt.

In the chaos at another bread line, a woman says Egyptians want President Hosni Mubarak to stay. The men there angrily demand that CNN leave, saying they don't want to be filmed in this sort of a desperate situation.

The same woman we met then comes to our car and apologizes for the way we are treated.

"It's only because of the terrible situation that we are in," she says, referring not just to the uncertainty but also to the struggle that daily life has become.

"We are good people. We are sorry."

It's not just the food shortages that are of rising concern. Most of the gas stations on major roads in the heart of the capital are closed. One owner, who did not want to appear on camera or have his station filmed, said it was because of security. He then ordered us to leave.

Another gas station had simply run out of fuel and was hoping that a tanker would appear. It doesn't seem likely.

Banks are all closed; the screens on ATM machines blank.

At one middle-class neighborhood, a woman in a black abaya demands to see our press credentials. A crowd gathers, shouting.

Muna al-Mahdi is the only person willing to air her grievances on camera.

"I am upset with the revolution in Tahrir Square," she says, her voice trembling with emotion. "It doesn't represent us. It doesn't represent our opinion. We are here sticking with Hosni Mubarak only.

"Give him two months, give him time to work," she says. "And then he can go peacefully."

Her voice quivers even more as she switches to Arabic to ask, "Who is going to govern Egypt? A bunch of youth?"

Another woman shouts: "I don't agree with you. You're not giving the right impression."

As the two women argue, a man in the crowd pushes his hand against the camera.

"Stop filming," he says.

Tensions rise. I head head back to the car with the rest of the CNN crew. Just as we're about to leave, a group of men -- headed by one wielding a machete -- stops the car in the parking lot.

The man screams to know what and why we are filming. He demands the tape, threatens to drive his machete into the hood of the vehicle. Eventually, we are able to leave peacefully.

It's another sign of the unknown.

Yet however much the winds of change are threatening to tear this nation apart, the demonstrators are determined to weather it.

"People here are supporting each other, you know. My neighbor gave us food, gave us water and all that we need. All the stores are supporting the people," Barak Saleh says as he heads back to the demonstration ground.

A group of young men carry a yellow sign painted in red. "Game over," it reads. Overhead, a kite flutters in the wind.

Machetes, meat cleavers, axes: Cairo's new neighborhood watches - CNN.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,104 Posts
"People here are supporting each other, you know. My neighbor gave us food, gave us water and all that we need. All the stores are supporting the people," Barak Saleh says as he heads back to the demonstration ground

This touched my heart but also raised a question...Would the Krogers, Sams Club, IGA, Aldi's, Piggly Wiggly, Sav-A-Lot open their doors to feed the hungry...oops...:ignore:their greed is showing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,196 Posts
"People here are supporting each other, you know. My neighbor gave us food, gave us water and all that we need. All the stores are supporting the people," Barak Saleh says as he heads back to the demonstration ground

This touched my heart but also raised a question...Would the Krogers, Sams Club, IGA, Aldi's, Piggly Wiggly, Sav-A-Lot open their doors to feed the hungry...oops...:ignore:their greed is showing.
They wouldn't open the door but the looter will.
I remember the looter during Katrina.
Walking out of Wal-Mart with everything they could carry.
Cops had TVs and tennis shoes in their hands.
 

·
performing monkey
Joined
·
4,230 Posts
the fiction perpetrated to distract from the true issue:


the reality (you see, libtards, photographs are real... cartoons aren't :eek: :lolsmash: ):

(is it me, or does that area appear NOT to be flooded, nor does it appear to be food they are looking for)

and the PROPER response:


and of course the Katrina Macot... Lootie
 

·
I am a little teapot
Joined
·
2,696 Posts
Blob-the beer ad is great!!! Love it!

I guess it's so funny because it's so sad.
 

·
Afraid, very afraid
Joined
·
145 Posts
"People here are supporting each other, you know. My neighbor gave us food, gave us water and all that we need. All the stores are supporting the people," Barak Saleh says as he heads back to the demonstration ground

This touched my heart but also raised a question...Would the Krogers, Sams Club, IGA, Aldi's, Piggly Wiggly, Sav-A-Lot open their doors to feed the hungry...oops...:ignore:their greed is showing.
JayJay, believe that and they have a religion they want to sell you.

What makes you think the stores are supporting the "people" just where are the stores getting their goods? Transportation is shut down, all the banks have remained closed, the country has come to a standstill. :p

You may want to look at the pictures in The_Blob's post above. A picture is worth a thousand words. :rolleyes:

Why do you think the "demonstrators" are attaking journalists. Me thinks they don't want the world to know the truth. Islamic extemists do not have a track record of telling the truth. :ignore:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,104 Posts
JayJay, believe that and they have a religion they want to sell you.

What makes you think the stores are supporting the "people" just where are the stores getting their goods? Transportation is shut down, all the banks have remained closed, the country has come to a standstill. :p

You may want to look at the pictures in The_Blob's post above. A picture is worth a thousand words. :rolleyes:

Why do you think the "demonstrators" are attaking journalists. Me thinks they don't want the world to know the truth. Islamic extemists do not have a track record of telling the truth. :ignore:
I know...always a plot or a 'reason' behind most efforts of kindness...but, I was just givng the benefit of the doubt on this one..kinda like Haiti isn't any better today than when the floods came; someone stole that money!!!...

Propaganda from the media??? Whoa, that's a new one!! (sarcasm avitar needed here)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
638 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I do feel bad for those people over there because they are nothing more than a tool being used for an end. The lack of services and food is done to keep them stirred up. This does show that if neighbor hoods do not get together, makes for easy pickin,s. Any one giving up personal protection for the so call sake of peace need,s the word idiot, tattooed on the forehead.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top