True 30 mile range

Discussion in 'Communications' started by Shammua, Apr 9, 2013.

  1. Shammua

    Shammua No Effort No Rewards, Big Effort Big Rewards

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    OK I know this has been beaten to death over and over, but here goes again anyway. Maybe a new spin this time?

    Is there anything out there that could be used for commo gear that DOESN'T require a license that can get a true 30 mile range (not on the open desert, but around urban, and outdoors) , be mobile (vehicle mounted if needed, handheld slave to vehicle if needed), and not cost 10minutes of our deficit interest.

    Basically what I am looking for is something that has great range so I can talk to and practice our commo opsec now, and when TSHTF we can still have our set comms for when those of our group are geographically removed can contact us when in vicinity.

    We have several locations setup and none of us have the EXACT location for all of them. So we have to be able to establish comms when in range to get carried into home.

    For those that have had a few to many or are just slow on the up take, here is what I mean.

    TSHTF and it's time to bug out. My family and I pack up and get buggin, however when we get to the location that we know about we find out it has been compromised (how doesn't matter here, just play along). So it's time to move on to another area. Well even with our compromised location the bad guys don't have anything to use because all we have is a region. So I live in Virignia Beach and we head west. One of our BOL's is in TN lets say. Well the only thing I know is an area on a map, and a memorized radio freq.

    We get to the designated area and following op sec we broadcast as preset and wait for response. Once we get a response, we have someone come get us and we follow into safety.


    So what I am asking for is a radio that we can get that will allow us to do this reasonably well without costing thousands of dollars to get. Or tons of silver, ounces of gold, or to much bartering to make happen. :p
     
  2. DKRinAK

    DKRinAK As smart as

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    Star trek

    The fast answer is - No.


    The last set of Communicators I had to dump because the unobtainum batteries couldn't be recharged.

    You have very little choice for non-license radio coms

    CB - With a large antenna up high on both ends, and using SSB maybe.

    MURS, two watts, by law. Not going to happen.

    GMRS, which may soon be license free is five watts with antenna/ ERP restrictions. If you want to buy into a repeater, 30 miles no problem, no repeater, no comms.

    I see this question about every other month. Short of finding a working set of Star Trek communicators, it just isn't going to happen, and in urban terrain, even less of a chance.



    If you had a ham license, you could set up a low cost Digital voice QRP system, but each part would required a transceiver, large antenna and on and on. Several hundred for each node.
     

  3. cnsper

    cnsper Well-Known Member

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    Smoke signals but they are worthless on stormy or windy days.
     
  4. rf197

    rf197 Trying to find a way

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    Without having 2 cans and a 30 mile long string I'd say no.
     
  5. k0xxx

    k0xxx Supporting Member

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    As the others before me have said, the short answer is no. Even in licensed services, 30 miles in real world conditions can be iffy for mobile or portable, depending on terrain. There's always Satellite phones, but in a true SHTF situation they may be restricted or disabled.
     
  6. zombieresponder

    zombieresponder random gibberish

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    I'm pretty sure that GMRS can run up to 50 watts. I'd have to go read part 97 again.
     
  7. Bobbb

    Bobbb Well-Known Member

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    You just think that they're worthless. What you're actually seeing with smoke signals on a windy day are ENCRYPTED smoke signals. The smoke looks noisy but if you have the decryption algorithm then you're golden.
     
  8. DKRinAK

    DKRinAK As smart as

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    A GMRS system consists of station operators, a mobile station (often comprised of several mobile units) and sometimes one or more land stations. A small base station is one that has an antenna no more than 20 feet above the ground or above the tree on which it is mounted and transmits with no more than 5 watts ERP.

    Source -
    http://www.fcc.gov/encyclopedia/general-mobile-radio-service-gmrs

    The MURS has a two watt limit, but no antenna restrictions or ERP limits - it is a no license class service - but you must use type accepted radios.
     
  9. invision

    invision Supporting Member - Crazy Huh?

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    Take the technicians exam... A little less than a week of studying and then your good to go... You can get 2 YAESU FT-8800R units and can definitely hit 30 miles... And if terrain is an obstacle, then you can bounce off a repeater...
     
  10. Shammua

    Shammua No Effort No Rewards, Big Effort Big Rewards

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    I am currently studying for my technicians exam. :) Woohoo!!!
    How hard is it to get your general afterwards? I'm pretty interested in being able to talk to Japan since that is where my son is going to be stationed at real soon.
     
  11. k0xxx

    k0xxx Supporting Member

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    The General license entails more actual knowledge of electronics and theory, but isn't too bad. It just takes a bit more time to study for. As for Japan, it relies on your location and propagation. Where I am located, propagation to Japan isn't everyday, but it's not at all rare.
     
  12. zimmy

    zimmy WELL SEASONED

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    communication

    The old 23 channel cb radios and some of the walkietalkies (sp?) with plug in crystals, if you swap out the transmit with the receive crystals it would put you above or below cb band. Of course this would be illegal unless you had the proper radio operator license.
     
  13. stanb999

    stanb999 Member

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    Skype phone. Crystal clear.
     
  14. stanb999

    stanb999 Member

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    You do realize that during your bug out you will likely be in violation of many laws. Curfews, travel bans, exclusion zones, etc.

    What one more violation?
     
  15. zombieresponder

    zombieresponder random gibberish

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    Just remember that there will be about a 18 or so hour time difference. Japan is going to be one of the first places I try to contact when I get my HF rig up. Gotta start studying japanese again.

    Nihongo wa hanimasu ka? :D
     
  16. TexasPatriot

    TexasPatriot Well-Known Member

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    Our group is in the process of setting up our comms for the very same reason you have described. We all have, or are working on getting ham licenses. Practice and comfort in use before the SHTF need is very important. The Tech licenses is simple enough to obtain and will get you on the road to learning.
    We have already been through the, "Is there any other way thing". Nope, not to get the distance you want.
     
  17. DKRinAK

    DKRinAK As smart as

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    Looking at this again, you may have an out, but this still requires a Ham license.

    You can purchase a 75 watt mobile rig and feed it into a 5/8 wave gain antenna. A quality antenna gives you ~about 3 db gain, so now your ERP is nearly 125 - 150 watts. That will carry the signal right to the radio horizon, so if you can even find a small hill or rise, you might get your 30 miles.
    This also assumes the fixed base station at your BOL has as much power and a good, tall antenna.
     
  18. Shammua

    Shammua No Effort No Rewards, Big Effort Big Rewards

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    I'm not to terribly worried about learning Japanese since it will be for talking to my son. He is getting stationed over there. Mostly we will talk the normal routes, phone, Skype, email, but we will also use HAM just in case something like the earthquake, typhoon, tidal wave, or other occurrences happen and normal line of communication are out.
     
  19. radiomaster

    radiomaster Trusted Advisor

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    Last edited: May 30, 2013
  20. Shammua

    Shammua No Effort No Rewards, Big Effort Big Rewards

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    So I have pretty much settled on HAM license and have been pushing forward on that option. Now my question is for those that have the HAM license and experience, what is a decent radio for starting out but will also work well for when I get my operators license? Or should I go with something simple like Yaesu or BaoFeng UV-5R 136-174/400-480 MHz Dual-Band small handheld for under $100 and then once I get my Operators license I get something like the Yaesu Ft-8900R Quad Band???