Travel Trailers

Discussion in 'Vehicle & Transportation' started by dksac2, Nov 29, 2008.

  1. dksac2

    dksac2 Member

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    Everyone should own one. Great bug out units. They have everything you need to stay warm, dry, cook, poop and sleep. While they may be a little high profile, if you are going bug out to the right area or just need to get away from a bad storm, destroyed home etc, they are great. You will need a proper tow vehicle.
    Ugly one's can be bought pretty cheap. Just test everything to insure it works before putting down the green backs. I have a PV system set up to charge my batteries, 110 gallons of fresh water and 35 gallons of treated fuel in the built in tank. If things get bad, I'm going to a friends place that is very rural. The trailer will give me and my wife a place to sleep. I just have to be sure that I read the timing right so that I can get out in time.

    JK
     
  2. 10101

    10101 Guest

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    sounds like a good plan,,, i have thought about the same but with a truck camper so that i can still tow a trailer at the same time.
     

  3. Tex

    Tex Pincushion

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    I like that thinking. After my kids grow up, I want to live on some land in one until I can build my dream "retirement house". I plan to have a 30x50 metal building built with covered RV parking and hookups. I'll set up power generation, water, and septic first and then build a house. The bug out mobile aspect will be a bonus.

    [​IMG]

    The closet washer, dryer, and freezer will be removed after the house is built.
     
  4. vikx

    vikx Active Member

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    There are all sorts of RVs out there-from tiny teardrops to big ol' honkers. I think the older vintage trailers about 15' long are something to consider. They often have no shower but a porta potti works and is easy to dump. The systems are simple and designed to use without power-hand water pumps, gas stove and icebox. Now "icebox" could cause a problem in a bug out situation. Some of these trailers even have an electric/propane refer, very economical to run. These little fridges are available new, spendy, but fit in the icebox space.

    The smaller the trailer, the more places it will go. If it's older, it draws less attention. The axel can be flipped to provide more ground clearance. Often sold as hunting rigs, they are comfortable for up to 4 adults and 2 kids or 2 parents and more kids...

    I have several, as it is my hobby to restore vintage travel trailers. They really are quite comfortable and some folks actually live in them. If you have any questions, I'd be glad to talk trailers. VK
     
  5. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    I prefer a tent-trailer that is small enough to be completely maneuverable and fully featured with enough room to live for long periods of time. Being outfitted with solar panels to keep the batteries charged is best. Double-up on the canvas insulation with quilted solar blankets to keep the heat in during cool nights is perfect.

    My old tent-trailer was amazing for back-country usage - didn't use any propane for heat, the canvas held the temperature comfortable, had lots of storage space and such. The only real problem was that we beat it up bad on the back-roads - high-centering the axles and bumper more than once. Shook up the trailer bad enough that it attempted to fall apart.

    My new tent-trailer doesn't store as much, weighs more, uses more propane to keep warm on cool nights, runs on the battery system almost continous (lights, water pump, stereo, etc) requiring a better solar-system to keep up to the power draw. I still like the new one (because it is new) .. but, there are things that really bug me about it. :eek:
     
  6. dukman

    dukman Greenhorn

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    Myself, I don't want my vehicle to be any longer than it has to be. I want to be AWAY from everything by the time I go to sleep, not out were everyone else is. If I have to, the first night I might get some rotten sleep in the driver's seat, but there is no reason not to be at the ranch by night number 2. My BOV has 4WD and can go most places others can't, and I make sure I remember some alternate routes to get where I want to go in an emergency. A trailer would restrict it from traveling some of those alternate routes...
     
  7. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    I figure it is time to update this thread with some pictures. Here is my Jeep (modified with 2" lift and 32" All Terrain Tires) w/ my Fleetwood Evolution E1 trailer (modified with dual 6-volt batteries, 80 watt solar-panel and soon to have dual 30# propane-tanks and a hitch-rack on the back for extra carry-capacity).

    First picture: Front view of Jeep with trailer in tow

    Second picture: 3/4 view of back of Jeep with trailer

    Third picture: 80 watt solar panel mounted. If you look closely, you might be able to see the quick-connect for the panel to connect with a cord that pulls out of the power-cover in the lower portion of the trailer body.

    Update w/ pictures to continue in the next message.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    These pictures show the "living side" of the trailer w/ awning and my hitch-setup. I am not happy with the design of the hitch / wiring yet. If the weather holds up well enough this weekend, I will be re-working the wiring and possibly changing my hitch to a more traditional one, modified with mini-shackle mounts to run my wiring through (keeps it higher and little to no chance of hooking on anything while on the trails).

    Finally - the last picture is of my new front bumper that I designed at work, formed and then welded up with my Miller MIG welder. It isn't finished yet - just waiting for nice weather again so that I can cut / bend a grill-protection-hoop (I have no garage to work in, so, I either have to wait for a friend's garage to become available, or, do the work outdoors).
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Canadian

    Canadian Well-Known Member

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    Sweet trailer. nice diamond plate. I can see your jeep gets a lot of use. Go Jeep Go!
     
  10. dukman

    dukman Greenhorn

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    saw one of those going down the road a couple weeks back, same color even! It looked pretty sweet.

    My dad just got an old Airstream... it is crazy what these things go for. He had one guy offer triple what he paid - and it is just a rolling shell! But, for a BOTR (Bug Out TRailer) these are great as they don't rust and as long as they don't get dented, they are not known for leaking. The downside is the shiny sides making it harder to hide.
     
  11. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    These trailers come in two colors - the bright yellow and a silver. I wanted the silver one (to match the Jeep) but couldn't have it delivered in time - so I took the next best thing. I have considered visiting a body-shop and having them paint the trailer a bit of a more "subdued" color ...
     
  12. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    Here are a few more pictures from my last weekend out. I brought my 1,000 watt generator - didn't use it except for spinning my support-legs down. My 80-watt panel kept my batteries alive and kicking the whole weekend - for 4 adults using the water-pump, lights, stereo, furnace - etc (and it snowed 2" as well).
     

    Attached Files:

  13. Canadian

    Canadian Well-Known Member

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    Great pics but Ohhhhhhhhhh! You parked the trailer under a pine! I used to work at a car dealership and we had some pine trees at the back of the lot. Sap is a horror show on fresh paint and even worse on a rag top. Still your trailer is meant to be used and hey trees are a part of being outdoors.

    Do you have a special method to get sap off the canopy? I find the only way to get sap that's been sitting on paint is a light pad and buffing compound.

    Where's the pics of you partying down? You don't have to show me the dry bic scenes but at least show me the empty bic package!
     
  14. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    There are special products available at RV stores that are designed for washing down awnings, canvas, etc. They are supposed to be good for sap, bugs, dirt, grime, mildew, etc. Some are designed to be used directly from a spray-bottle on the trailer, some are designed to be added to your high-pressure wand-washer and pressure-washed over your trailer.
     
  15. Jason

    Jason I am a little teapot

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    My father has a 28' fifth wheel travel trailer that he pulls with a Chevy half ton truck. Surprisingly, the 1500 does a real good job of pulling the thing. We use it for hunting up in Northern PA a lot in the fall and we camp when we can through the summer. It holds all the essentials for 3 adults and the baby just fine and there are some hidey holes for stuff you dont want people to notice. It's a great rig but a bit cumbersome for a bug out. NaeKid's rig looks ideal for that purpose. Especially with a year-old son, though, for us the big trailer would still be the way to go.
     
  16. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    We have taken our grandson out many times - since he was just barely able to crawl. He is 4 now and just spent another week out with us - in the trailer. It isn't bad for the three of us together, but, I will admit that things start to get a little cramp'd when you put a fourth or fifth into the trailer. I would not want to be 6 in it unless we setup separate-sleeping quarters (hammock, tent, cot, etc) and just used the trailer as a camp-shack / home-base.
     
  17. rozy

    rozy Guest

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    Wow these trailors are tooo good. I wish I could have one.
     
  18. GatorDude

    GatorDude Well-Known Member

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    These trailers look pretty good. I'll have to consider getting one when the job situation re-stabilizes.
     
  19. The_Blob

    The_Blob performing monkey

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    IMO right NOW is the best time to buy a good 'fixer-upper' trailer, while everyone is panicking & looking at their trailers as a luxury instead of as an emergency/auxillary shelter
     
  20. sea_going_dude

    sea_going_dude Active Member

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    Been there done that and PINE SAP does not wash down. takes something like kero or lighter fluid to take it off and that would also remove the water proofing from any tent material. Better and easier to prevent the pine drips and there are a lot of them in hot weather.