Top 100 things that disappear first in an emergency.

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by sewingcreations15, Nov 10, 2017.

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  1. sewingcreations15

    sewingcreations15 Hard working Aussie

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    @Caribou fully agree that cost wise water containers are a far cheaper way of storing a lot of water as compared to bottled water too. We have 10lts containers of water in the home with a spigot and also 2200lts of rainwater in tanks.

    @SheepdogPRS yes that was the case and all the more reason why we should be stocking in advance in our homes. A situation where no stocks are coming in creates the perfect opportunity for trading if you ran out of certain items and surviving off your own stocked items. In their case it was a case of what supermarket as they simply didn't have that option available to them.

    It is food for thought that we all have to think about is what if there isn't a supermarket open, stocked or had been previously pilfered is would we survive and for how long.
     
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  2. oldasrocks

    oldasrocks Well-Known Member

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  3. angie_nrs

    angie_nrs Well-Known Member

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    It would be interesting to see what that list would look like in our "modern era" here in the states. I think when I hear stories like this I automatically try and relate it to my own situation. Many of the same issues would arise. But some things would be a bit different. I think mostly in the fact that I really think our current population is "soft".

    I often think about that. What if it was too dangerous to get to my local small town market? I have several options planned if that was the case. Even though I live within a few miles of some local businesses, there aren't many so I've thought about ALL my options close to home. If they are all unavailable.....then it is what it is. Hopefully I have my pantry and other supplies stocked good enough. I don't ever get that feeling that I am totally prepared (wish I did), but I do get a small feeling of satisfaction the closer I get to that ultimate and likely unattainable goal. I know all of it can be taken away in an instant, so I try and consider that as well and attempt to plan around it the best I can.
     
  4. sewingcreations15

    sewingcreations15 Hard working Aussie

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    @angie_nrs to be perfectly honest I don't think any of us think we are 100% self sufficient or stocked with preps :) . All of us can only do the best we can given our own circumstances. I have a massive prepping and food list in my brain that I work on step by step and being that we are both lower income (on pensions due to DH's huge injuries) and we are saving for a home being built it is just a bit more challenging than most would find it.
     
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  5. AmishHeart

    AmishHeart Well-Known Member

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    I know none of us are 100 percent prepared or 100 percent self reliant. BUT the majority of people are 0 percent prepared and self reliant. We are in a better place than most. Just do what we can and it's so much more than nothing.
     
  6. gabbyj310

    gabbyj310 Not so new

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    Since I travel alot I always grab the little shampoos,etc in the hotel rooms.I have alot stored.I bag up the tooth paste,small soaps shampoos etc in baggies for barter when the SHTF. Same with the little coffee and tea,sugar and creamers...I also have a small solar generator.The extras(sugar,mayo,catsup) at any of the fast food places are also a good addition
     
  7. sewingcreations15

    sewingcreations15 Hard working Aussie

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    @AmishHeart you are so right that we are all in a far better preparation mode than most of the population too and the main thing is we have a plan that works.
     
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  8. sewingcreations15

    sewingcreations15 Hard working Aussie

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    They are also a good prepping item the saved coffee, sugar and creamers as well as the sauces too and the toiletries @gabbyj310 :) . Something else we can all add to our prepping items that would come in handy.
     
  9. RedBeard

    RedBeard Guest

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    I don't know, me and my family are pretty darn self sufficient. The world ends today and im not worried about much. We prep every day so we can make it to the next harvest. It cost us less money to live and when crap shuts down we are hardly affected. Im not saying we are 100 percent but when the time comes it won't be hard to be 100 percent.
     
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  10. sewingcreations15

    sewingcreations15 Hard working Aussie

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    @RedBeard that is the right place for your family to be and we also prep every day and preserve our garden vegetables until we can grow them again too. Thoroughly agree that growing your own vegetables saves a fortune as well.

    We don't notice it a lot when power of other facilities don't work or close down either in fact the other night we had a power blackout for about 2 hours and the only reason we knew it was a blackout was that the street lights went out because we use solar lanterns in our home :) .
     
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  11. RedBeard

    RedBeard Guest

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    Takes all the stress out of it when you live like us. I have always followed the Amish,Quakers, and the Shakers. They live full, beautiful, simple, yet productive lives. That's why i always laugh when people try and tell me that a convenience is a necessity. People of today have it all backwards.
     
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  12. SheepdogPRS

    SheepdogPRS Newbie

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    Some of the conveniences we have today are necessities for some people. Electricity for refrigeration and fast transportation are all that keep diabetics and dialysis patients alive. A lot of our infrastructure supports medical care that keeps people alive.
     
  13. weedygarden

    weedygarden Well-Known Member

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    When it comes to storing water in larger containers, it needs to be easily accessible. Pouring water even from a 7 gallon container every time someone wants a drink or needs some for cooking is not easy. There are a few options.

    I have gotten some 5 gallon dispenser type bottles free on Craigslist. I have also gotten two different dispensers for those bottles, one that dispenses hot and cold water, another that is a ceramic counter top dispenser.

    I do have water in several other type of containers including the 7 gallon jugs, former juice containers, and in canning jars. I could envision a time when everyone has a quart canning jar or juice jar as their ration of water for a period of time. Glass breaks, plastic can have chemicals, and then there is an aluminum can, which is a one time use for drinking.

    While the list does include canning jars, I think that all canning jars that we have should contain something in storage, and if we don't have anything to can, then they could have water.
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2017
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  14. angie_nrs

    angie_nrs Well-Known Member

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    Actually there are quite a few options, but most people don't think of that being a problem. I have a few of the 7 gal dark blue water jugs from WM that have the spigot on them. They are the really thick plastic and they are a bit more expensive, but so much more versatile than the regular light blue (camping type) water jugs that are used to put water into an RV. I would use the jugs with spigots at hand cleaning stations. People that went thru the hurricane used them in their bathrooms with the spigot over the sink so they could wash their hands after doing their business, wasting as little water as possible. Plus they didn't need to have someone help them by pouring water over their hands. It's just way more convenient to have something like that available if the power goes out.

    For drinking I would use my 5 gallon water gott (like high schools use in football games), which has the spigot on the bottom. We use this when we go camping for coffee and drinking water. I also have the gallon glass iced tea containers with the spigot on the bottom. In addition you can also purchase a hand pump to use with the round 5 gallon culligan-type water containers. You just screw off the lid and put the pump in and you're ready to go. Those you can purchase at WM too and they are pretty inexpensive.

    I'm like Si on Duck Dynasty (can't believe I said that - lol). I carry around a 1 quart rubbermaid jug and drink water from it all day long. I drink 2-3 of those per day. I'll probably do this until the day I'm dead, since I've been doing it for probably 15 years or more now.
     
  15. bugoutbob

    bugoutbob Work in progress

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    Typically the first thing to disappear in any emergency is a politician. Once it's safe they will come back and try to use it to their own political/financial advantage.
     
  16. RedBeard

    RedBeard Guest

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    Very good point, didn't think of that. I am very thankful that's not an issue in my family. Good point indeed.
     
  17. sewingcreations15

    sewingcreations15 Hard working Aussie

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    @weedygarden I agree with @angie_nrs on alternative water containers too but unfortunately living in a different area to you I don't know what the alternatives are available to you.

    Here for water containers we have purchased 10lt bottled water containers from Aldi for $3.99 that come with a dispenser similar to a large wine cask that you can operate by pushing on a lever and putting your glass underneath to fill your glass. When the town water stops working here we put a little water in the vanity basin from this and wash our hands in it and if we do something particularly dirty then we rinse with a little bit of water from the container.

    We carry one full one in the car with us refilled with town water and have numerous ones we have refilled around the house too. When we go out we carry personal drinking bottles also with carbon filters in them called bobble bottles which carry around 600ml of water in them too and can be attached to your jeans belt by a carabiner clip.
     
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  18. sewingcreations15

    sewingcreations15 Hard working Aussie

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    @SheepdogPRS you are also right about things like electricity being vital to those who in the situation of high medical care too.

    Rolling at your statement @bugoutbob and I believe some played golf ;) not mentioning any names, others in emergency services heading crisis situations went home to bed and said they didn't want to be disturbed and the list goes on.
     
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  19. Flight1630

    Flight1630 Junior Member

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    And unfortunately if the power ever goes out for a lengthy time meaning after the emergency generators stop working, if not all then most of those people will probably pass away.
     
  20. bugoutbob

    bugoutbob Work in progress

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    The number of people being kept alive (and/or sane) through the miracles of modern medicine who will pass away or go off the deep end will be astounding and tragic. If you run through a quick list of people you know who are being kept alive or have some form of life quality because of technology and medication it can be sobering.