tools

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by easttexas, Apr 30, 2011.

  1. easttexas

    easttexas Member

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    does everyone here have tools that dont use gas or electricty? a lot of the old tools are still available in swap shops, garage sales and antique shops files? shovels and gardening equipment? grinders, mills, machetes? scissors,when lawnki is done you will need these things and much much more too much to list! it is most important to have your food and weapons cache but did you think about being able to make repairs? how about toilet paper? those leaves get mighty rough! i guess what im trying to say is the jobs not over till the paperwork is done!!
     
  2. Frugal_Farmers

    Frugal_Farmers Good ole country folk

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    Funny you should mention pld fashioned hand tools.

    We have been focusing on building our old fashioned hand tool collection recently. I just received an antique double axe head today. The steel in old tools was built to last in lieu opf the garbage produced today.

    We agree that everyone should consider a collection of non powered tools for worst case scenario. Know what current prices of each item are so you know what to pay for these older tools.
     

  3. Emerald

    Emerald Well-Known Member

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    I've been collecting hand tools for a while now... Plus tons of extra good knives that I find at yard sales.. No one wants the older style or old knives or hand tools so I end up getting them for a song! I even have a grain mill for $25 cuz no one knew what it was.
    There are many other things on the list that I am still looking for.
     
  4. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    Yep. :) I have several high-wheel plows and cultivators; 3 scythes with extra blades and one with a grain cradle; a couple brace and bit units, cross-cut saws, hand saws, axes, hatchets, mauls, spade and flat shovels, an old pedal powered grinding wheel and files to sharpen the tools.
    Like you said; the list is long but we are well on our way.
     
  5. *Andi

    *Andi Supporting Member

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    Hmmm ... well... that is the way I live ... :D
     
  6. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    I'll hang on to my power tools as long as I can thanks. :D
     
  7. easttexas

    easttexas Member

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    uncle joe,ill keep my power tools also but the point im trying to make is without electricity they are only good for lookin at!
     
  8. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    That's why we have all the hand tools. :)
    We also have a small solar panel and a 400w inverter that provides enough power to charge the cordless drills and 5" circular saws. At least we don't have to go entirely "Little House On The Prairie." :D
     
  9. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    Try a 1000 watt inverter. It may power your other tools and will do better overall on even the smaller ones. They're pretty reasonable in price now.

    I run my skill saws on one.

    That said, we're well supplied on non-electric tools as well.
     
  10. tsrwivey

    tsrwivey Supporting Member

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    We had a decent collection of hand tools before we became interested in prepping. We used them as decoration in our old house. Funny how things work out sometimes.
     
  11. Jason

    Jason I am a little teapot

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    For things like axes and sledge hammers (or for that matter, handles for sledge hammers, etc) I like to get cheapies from garage sales and stuff. Makes so much more sense than paying top dollar for a good new one. You can still get good tools but you pay through the nose. Personally I'm good for breaking at least one sledge hammer handle a year, and I don't even use them that much.

    Basically that's my long winded way of agreeing with everybody else. :)
     
  12. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    Once I get a decent size panel I'll look into that. I plugged one of the cordless drills into the inverter today and found it only draws 3-4 watts. If things come apart before I get a bigger panel at least I know I can keep these charged. :)

    BTW Welcome back! :wave:
     
  13. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    It doesn't take much to recharge the battery pack for a cordless drill. The first thing to go out on a small inverter like that will be the cooling fan. When it starts squeeling take the back off and cut the wires to the fan and keep using the inverter. I've got one that's been in use for at least three years without the fan working. We threw away several before we started disabling the fans.

    Thanks. It's nice to be home and have decent internet service again.
     
  14. abbyjhon

    abbyjhon New Member

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    Where i can find info of Hand Tool products??

    Please suggest me some sites Where i can find info of hand tool products??

    Reply soon..
     
  15. Jason

    Jason I am a little teapot

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    MMM, I'm not familliar with inverters or the type of fans that they use so forgive me if this is a dumb question, but could you replace a bad inverter fan with a fan from a computer? I was thinking you might be able to get a used PC fan from a computer shop relatively cheaply.

    Just a thought...
     
  16. LincTex

    LincTex Jack of all trades?

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    Please be careful - - I know for a fact first-hand that the inexpensive "modified sine wave" inverters will kill Craftsman and Skill chargers, and have been told will also kill DeWalt. Not sure about others. They can not handle the choppy wave form.

    I built my bug-out location "camping cabin" using power tool running entirely off of solar panels, batteries and inverters. I have one small 300W/600W "Pure sine" inverter for just the cordless battery chargers.

    A 12 volt cordless drill is easily converted to run off of a 12 volt car battery. I keep one in my truck with a 25 foot cord, and have used it NUMEROUS times over the years!


    The small fans on the CPU in old computers is about the same size.... and much better quality - - they will run for years without squealing. I have several dozen computer fans... I save all I can get since they are 12 volt, use very little electricity and have tons of uses!!
     
  17. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    PC fans might work if they'll fit the opening. We don't bother with them. The inverters have circuitry to shut them down when they overheat and in my experience they seemed to shut down just as quickly with the fan operational as without the fan. We have not had a cheap inverter die due to overheating after cutting the fan leads.

    My Ryobi 18 volt drill and saw have worked fine for the last year charging the batteries on a 1000 watt Xantrex inverter purchased at Costco for $39.99. We've also used it for cell phone charging, AAA, AA, C & D rechargeable batteries, three laptop and three notebook computers, our portable phone, and our video camera without problems. We've also operated desk type computers with an inverter. I can't say it will not cause problems with other equipment but they've worked fine in our experience.

    We've used 40 watt inverters you plug into the cigarette lighter socket to charge/run portable DVD players, laptop computers, cell phones and cameras. I use a 350 watt inverter for electric drills and all the aforementioned as well. It will overheat and shutdown using an electric drill when boring through house logs or other difficult jobs. We use the 1000 watt Xantrex inverter for most things in the cabin and we have our refrigerator powered by our 850 watt Trace inverter which is the only "high" quality inverter we own. We've been doing this for almost eight years now.

    Incidentally, the 1000 watt Xantrex inverter replaced an older one of the same make that a lightning strike took out. The new models are not anywhere near as good as the old one was.
     
  18. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    I'd be interested in seeing how you did this. It could be very helpful.

    Thanks
     
  19. LincTex

    LincTex Jack of all trades?

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    Keep the dead battery pack, but carefully cut the bottom off around the perimeter and remove the dead ni-cads. Note the polarity of the leads the cells are soldered to. Drill a hole hear the top of the pack on the back to push the cord through. Tie a double knot in the cord as a strain relief. Strip the ends of the wire and solder your cord (I like heavy gauge speaker wire because you can note polarity) to the leads.

    Attach a heavy-duty 12 volt plug (lighter style) to the other end. (or use red and black alligator clips)

    Most cordless drills are balanced nicely with the battery pack installed, so before you glue the old cover on the battery pack, add some ballast. It doesn't have to be as heavy as the batteries that came out. Make sure you can remove it later if needed to fix the electrical connection inside, so don't fill it with plaster of paris unless you enjoy chipping it out. I just use silicone sealer to attach a large rock or something inside. I attach the plastic bottom of the pack back on with epoxy and a strip of wetted fiberglass cloth.
     
  20. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    Excellent! Thanks a bunch. I'm always seeing DC drills, etc. with bad batteries at yard sales. Now I can't wait to pick some up. :2thumb: