Thermoelectric Power Generation Modules

Discussion in 'Energy & Electricity' started by guyfour, Apr 29, 2009.

  1. guyfour

    guyfour Guest

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    I have been interested in harnessing the massive heat that even a small fresnal lense can generate from some time now and eventually stumbled upon thermoelectric power generation from flat plate like electronic modules.

    It's a little square that if you hit it with a flame, it generates electricity based on the heat moving from the front of the square to the back of it (you put a heat sink on the back made out of aluminum to absorb the heat and possibly something cool under it)

    Next I found this: PG-1 Power Generation Kit

    It uses an open flame to generate electricity through the module.

    Turn it upside down, fill a pole with metal, and line the side of it with fresnal lenses that automatically tilt the correct angle... or just use an extremely large fresnal lense... (the size of a big screen TV and also you need special glasses in order to calibrate the point to an exact dot which might mess up the energy collector if it's too hot)

    The pole will be hot for long after the sun is gone also just watch this video

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUrB7KRvxUk]YouTube - FRESNEL SOLAR STIRLING ENGINE SUN POWER ALTERNATIVE ENERGY STIRLING MOTOR GENERATOR[/ame]

    See how they have the metal pole on the side to absorb heat

    My question is... how many of these would you have to make to power a house provided you can get each one hot enough with fresnal lenses? How big of a battery bank could it keep charged?


    "Tellurex has designed the PG-1 to power its fan and maintain the temperature difference with power to spare. The net output of approximately 0.75 Watt is adjustable from 3 to 14 VDC by means of a built-in voltage converter, making application of this device extremely flexible"
     
  2. northernontario

    northernontario Well-Known Member

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    Well... according to their website, you're looking at roughly $250 to generate 0.75w.

    That's $1000 to generate 4w... and you still need batteries.

    That makes it a horribly expensive way to generate electricity. Compare that to a couple solar panels, a wind turbine, and a battery bank...