The Treadle Janome Sewing Machine

Discussion in 'Quilting and Sewing' started by historyhomesteader, Jul 26, 2012.

  1. historyhomesteader

    historyhomesteader New Member

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    I'm sure that some of you already sew with non-electric machines, and to you all this is old news, because some people sew entirely with antique treadles. I just want to share this with those who haven't considered or explored non-electric machines yet.

    The antique treadle machines are good, you can get them pretty cheap, and you could just about run over them with a tank and not damage them too much. When properly adjusted they make beautiful stitching. I have 2 treadle machine-heads and also a hand-cranked model.

    After using my antique Singer treadle machine-head for a few projects, I really wanted a machine that would do a little more. I found out that Janome makes a non-electric "modern" machine intended for the Amish and other off-grid folks. I had an older electric Janome, which was a good machine, so I decided to try their treadle version.

    The Janome is not the heavy, almost indestructible antique machine-head; it's made of plastic like most modern machines. Unlike the older treadles, however, it has adjustable stitch-length, zig-zags, and goes backwards. It has a button-hole feature as well. I must say the button-hole feature has not impressed me very much, but it DOES make them and I may just need to play with this more.

    You mount this Janome on an antique stand, which you can pick up for about $25 in most areas, or you can buy a new treadle stand. The table is a bit of a problem. If you have an antique table on your stand, you may have to do a bit of retro-fitting to get the machine to sit correctly so that the leather drive-cord lines up. You can also buy a new table that fits this machine, which is what we did. It's not very good quality, but (other than the drawers, which were worthless), it's useable.

    Remember: as with all non-electric machines, you'll need some source of light, like a window or some type of lamp. Too bad they can't rig a little generator on the treadle that also powers a tiny light-bulb! (Maybe some handy person out there could work on that!)

    I've sewn several dresses for our little girl on the treadle-Janome now, and I think it does a decent job for the hobby seamstress and you may want to look into it.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 26, 2012
  2. IlliniWarrior

    IlliniWarrior Well-Known Member

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    Janome makes a combo treadle/electric powered model also ..... it has a "free arm" type operation ..... usually sells for around the same $$$$ as the all treadle machine ....

    a Mennonite distributor, in northern Indiana, sells either machine for $349 (includes shipping to the lower 48 states)
     

  3. DKRinAK

    DKRinAK As smart as

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    Thanks

    Thanks - didn't know that Janome made a dual use machine.

    I see these for sale even here (Alaska) but the last couple have been the nasty - cheap - Chinese knockoffs.

    Still looking for a hand-crank retro-retro fit form my model 66.

    Thanks for the pic!
     
  4. *Andi

    *Andi Supporting Member

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    I have my Grams treadle machine, no one wanted it ... but me. (silly people :D)
     
  5. lovetogrow

    lovetogrow Member

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    I've got my grandmother's treadle, same thing, nobody wanted it. I drove her crazy playing with her machine :gaah:. She was a master seamstress :2thumb: in demand!

    Thank you for the headsup historyhomesteader :2thumb:
     
  6. kappydell

    kappydell Well-Known Member

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    there is an excellent web site: treadleon on google, it has much information on the care, feeding, repair, etc of treadle machines. Lots of good info including sources for parts!
     
  7. machinist

    machinist Rest In Peace

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    Thanks for the info. We have thought about a new Janome and have an old treadle base for it. But we have a Singer treadle machine MADE IN THE 1960's !!! Made in Scotland, where they were still popular then. The really cool part is, parts interchange with my wife's electric Singer portable that she bought in 1965! The treadle machine won't reverse, though, like the old ones.

    It seems like the further we get into self reliance, the more our place looks like Dad's in the 1950's. :rolleyes: Got the wringer washing machine, hand well pump out back, wood stove, etc.. Smokehouse coming soon.
     
  8. Emerald

    Emerald Well-Known Member

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    you mean like this!!! I used to have one on my bike when younger but it had a head light and a tail light.
    http://www.amazon.com/Factor-3-Inch...0068&sr=8-1&keywords=bicycle+lights+generator
     
  9. RUN1251

    RUN1251 Well-Known Member

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    Go to an antique shop and buy an old foot pedal Singer. That's what I did. Bought a great one for $90. The drawers were stuffed full on needles, bobbins and some gorgeous antique lace. Works like a charm!!
     
  10. Grimm

    Grimm There is a place in Hell for me...the THRONE.

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    Could someone tell the model numbers of these machines? I am a costumer and would love to add a 'modern' treadle sewing machine to my workshop.
     
  11. Jerry D Young

    Jerry D Young Well-Known Member

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  12. Grimm

    Grimm There is a place in Hell for me...the THRONE.

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  13. Grimm

    Grimm There is a place in Hell for me...the THRONE.

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  14. Jerry D Young

    Jerry D Young Well-Known Member

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    I've been looking for that elusive machine for a while. Thank you.
     
  15. catsraven

    catsraven Meoww

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    Your both welcome ;)
     
  16. kappydell

    kappydell Well-Known Member

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    Oh yes...back in the 90s I called Brownsville TX, and asked a sewing distributor if he sold treadle machines. He said (at that time) Singer still made them for foreign markets, and he did sell them then.
     
  17. Grimm

    Grimm There is a place in Hell for me...the THRONE.

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    I know you can find parts for antique Singers at the quilt shows. These are coveted by sewers in my neck of the 'woods'. Even the thrift stores sell them for $500+. And that is in poor condition and in need of repairs! :mad: