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Seriously, the number of tractors available shouldn't be a problem. There are far more tractors in America than are being used. The biggest problems will probably be:

1. Fuel
2. Other consumables, like batteries, grease and oil
3. Distribution of tractors from those who die, or those who have more than they can use, to those who do not have them
4. Accidents from inexperienced people using tractors
5. Adequacy of implements available locally. People typically keep old tractors, but scrap old implements. You have that nice little diesel tractor, but do you have a rototiller, or a plow and harrow for it? Other useful attachments?
 

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Jack of all trades?
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Seriously, the number of tractors available shouldn't be a problem. There are far more tractors in America than are being used. The biggest problems will probably be:

1. Fuel
2. Other consumables, like batteries, grease and oil
3. Distribution of tractors from those who die, or those who have more than they can use, to those who do not have them
4. Accidents from inexperienced people using tractors
5. Adequacy of implements available locally. People typically keep old tractors, but scrap old implements. You have that nice little diesel tractor, but do you have a rototiller, or a plow and harrow for it? Other useful attachments?
1. Fuel is best when stored from easily obtained stocks. Gasoline is under $2.30 and I'm storing it in old Freon containers.
Fuel can be made from wood gas, vegetable oil, etc... but it isn't easy.
2. Grease lasts along time. Oil can be filtered over and over again through blue jeans (or a toilet paper roll) when you shut the machine off for the day. batteries aren't needed if you have a magneto (or a solar panel), and diesel can be rolled down a hill to start it as long as you park it at the top when done. TIRES will be the biggest things - make sure you have good tires on it RIGHT NOW.
3. "Dog in the manger" syndrome will be problem. Many tractors might be useable, but they are in the wrong location (someone else's place) and acquiring them post-SHTF may be problematic. They are so cheap right now - - anyone who owns one should get one if they have a place for it.
4. Hopefully only the ones experienced enough will attempt this, but if it happens to someone else that's really too bad.
5. Ehhhh.... It depends, really. Some folks have good equipment; I do. A good welder can make a lot of stuff, or at least adapts as needed. A lot of implements designed for 150 HP tractors can be cut down into something that can be pulled by a 30 HP tractor.
 

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RockyMountainCanadian
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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Hopefully there will be enough sense of community to need to use big tractors and their implements 2 or three passes over the potato patch with big iron takes a lot less time than 20 with an 8N, just need bigger gates:scratch
 

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Jack of all trades?
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TiredIron, that would work for a while in the rural areas....
until someone with more diesel (or tires, etc.) than his neighbors can keep farming while the others can't.

THEN you get resentment and animosity...
and grumblings about "the greater good", etc.

A solid community of good people would succeed, but a few bad apples would ruin it for everybody.

Post-SHTF, I do worry about what would be needed to protect the food supply. If I only raise/grow enough food for my 8, and another family of eight wants to split it with me, all 16 of us go hungry.
 

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Texian
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Hopefully there will be enough sense of community to need to use big tractors and their implements 2 or three passes over the potato patch with big iron takes a lot less time than 20 with an 8N, just need bigger gates:scratch
It all depends on how far the big tractors have to travel for those two passes. If it's a few hundred yards, then it's no big deal if it's pre-scheduled so it's not an inconvenience.
But if it's 5 miles OTOH, that's a whole different thing. Plus the big tractor owner is going to have to be compensated in some way for his time and fuel.
 

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Linctech, you are right about the tires. Tires are a very major issue. Hint: Be sure you have radial tires on your tractor-- a lot easier to repair a nail hole.

As for the community good, and so on, as long as there is any sort of peace in a given area, the big farmers will be best off farming their own land, not wasting time digging up people's carrot patches. If they have fuel to operate their big iron, they need to use it to farm as much of their own property as they can manage, post collapse. Then, if for instance, they don't have enough seed to plant it all, they only till and plant what they can. They could always till a little extra and let neighbors without tractors come and plant carrots and squash on the extra tilled land, if they don't have enough commercial farm seed to get a full crop in.

What should happen, foodwise, is, that if there is a population die-off of fifty percent or more in a single year, ranchers and pastoralists ought to be able to seriously keep beef and sheep going. All the land for which there is no seed to plant, can be grazed as grass and weeds come up on it. Hogs can be kept this way too, if people know how to do it. Ranchers ought to become the richest people in the land--people will give anything they have for food. Cattle and other livestock can be maintained under some pretty primitive conditions. Ranchers would become the new kings of the continent, and the fights and wars would come down to people trying to steal their cattle, or eliminate competition from other eaters, etc. It would become like fiefdom--anyone not self-sufficient would become a serf of the ranchers.
 

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RockyMountainCanadian
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4,288 Posts
Discussion Starter · #47 ·
excellent I want more serfs
 
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