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That false bravado isn't taking you out of the situation you're facing. This actual answer isn't some superstition.

Canada only functioned fairly well when everyone was assimilated to a mostly unified vision of Western culture with shared values. "Assimilated" is the key principle. And assimilation is now over. "They" are not being required to assimilate anymore are they?

The change you're witnessing (and that you're rightly rejecting) is the shift to what globalists intend from this point forward. The multicult agenda is a replacement agenda. You're, (we're) being intentionally replaced. We've reached the end, because we're old and have not created enough children to continue what has been built. And frankly, our children expect too much in the opinion of the governing classes. As we weaken, we can only resist change in lesser and lesser amounts. And that suits elitists just fine. Weak people are easier to manipulate, milk and hold down.

What has been created in the last period will not be handed to indigenous people for the next period. It will be handed to imported inferior cultures (inferior in our opinion of values) of people who never had and never will have the ability to build and maintain anything other than a servitude variety of culture filled with more demands for government to change our culture. The decaying West is being intentionally weakened further for it's people so that other cultures can be introduced to take a larger and larger role. These are the last of the good old days. Those people who never earned anything will inherit what is left of what was built. And they're going to destroy your values in the name of multicult.

There are two sides. Multicult and Nationalism. One is the scourge in the eyes of the elite. The other is their baby.
 

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... "He said he believes the RCMP and CSIS are 'doing the best they can' and cited several thwarted homegrown terror plots, including that of Ottawa's Hiva Alizadeh, 33, who was sentenced this week to 24 years in prison for trying to organize attacks on Canadian targets." ...

And he only got 24 years?
 

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"... The Afghanistan-born teen, who has links to extremist* Islamic group Al-Furqan, was hit in the head by a single bullet after stabbing the AFP agent in the head, neck and abdomen. ..."

Only one bullet? If he'd have been in the US the cops would have fired ten shots each and only one of the bullets would have hit him.
 

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RockyMountainCanadian
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Many Canadian law enforcement types subscribe to "fire a warning shot through this head" model. Don't point unless you intend to shoot, don't shoot unless you intend to kill. Don't waste ammo , that stuff is good for target practice. :2thumb:
 

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Canada only functioned fairly well when everyone was assimilated to a mostly unified vision of Western culture with shared values. "Assimilated" is the key principle. And assimilation is now over. "They" are not being required to assimilate anymore are they?
You don't know anything about Canada and yet you are telling us when and how it functioned:rolleyes:

Canada has always been "multicultural":rolleyes:, there was never a time when everyone was forced to assimilate. I have several relatives and ancestors who came here from Europe a century ago or more that NEVER learned to speak english to any kind of fluency.

These people BUILT the towns, halls, roads, churches, land and country we live in. Nobody said they were pushing some kind of multicultural agenda because of the names they chose for the places and things they built, didn't learn the language, preserved their traditions, culture and clothes, etc. Because nobody who mattered gave a $#!& and those that did were largely ignored.

Yes, our country is doing pretty good these days, certainly better than a decade ago from my perspective (and those close to me). I would be more than happy to debate that with someone who actually knows something about the country, because we all have different experiences. There are issues for sure, just not as many for me as when we had the gun registry, wheat pool, mandatory long form census, etc.
 

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You don't know anything about my experience, yet you are willing to behave in your typical smarmy demeanor and pretend that you do. America has always been multicultural as well and plenty of people dying of old age today here do not speak English or do not speak it well, yet spent the majority of their life here.

Multicult then is not the multicult of your present life and tomorrow. If you weren't preoccupied with being what you are you'd understand something...other than focusing on destroying a thread to try to get the last word.

You have zero ability to overcome your condescending attitude to actually have a debate.
 

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Like it or not, the Islamist radicals are at war with us, the Westerners. They hate our lifestyle, and freedom. They want a caliphate worldwide. We may not be officially at war with them, but they have been at war with us, for quite some time. They are getting more emboldened each day too.
 

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RockyMountainCanadian
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You don't know anything about Canada and yet you are telling us when and how it functioned:rolleyes:

Canada has always been "multicultural":rolleyes:, there was never a time when everyone was forced to assimilate. I have several relatives and ancestors who came here from Europe a century ago or more that NEVER learned to speak english to any kind of fluency.

These people BUILT the towns, halls, roads, churches, land and country we live in. Nobody said they were pushing some kind of multicultural agenda because of the names they chose for the places and things they built, didn't learn the language, preserved their traditions, culture and clothes, etc. Because nobody who mattered gave a $#!& and those that did were largely ignored.

Yes, our country is doing pretty good these days, certainly better than a decade ago from my perspective (and those close to me). I would be more than happy to debate that with someone who actually knows something about the country, because we all have different experiences. There are issues for sure, just not as many for me as when we had the gun registry, wheat pool, mandatory long form census, etc.
A big difference in the new immigrant is that many of them want to ram their culture, the one that many are claiming refugee status from, down our throats. Back in the day, you might be invited to attend a cultural ceremony, to enjoy the tradition, not be offered to have your cranium removed if you don't submit to the culture.
 

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Quite true. They don't want to assimilate. They want to change our nations now. That's become obvious if we look.

Like it or not, the Islamist radicals are at war with us, the Westerners. They hate our lifestyle, and freedom. They want a caliphate worldwide. We may not be officially at war with them, but they have been at war with us, for quite some time. They are getting more emboldened each day too.
Our American government and other governments are paying them, providing them weapons and urging them to destabilize the region. This isn't a home grown uprising.
 

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I think that this bit of info is a fairly good map and overview of multiculturalism in Canada. I'd offer an opinion but it might be a bit skewed as I was raised by Archie Bunker of the north :D

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiculturalism_in_Canada

Excerpt:

"Multiculturalism in Canada is the sense of an equal celebration of racial, religious and cultural backgrounds. Multiculturalism policy was officially adopted by the Canadian government during the 1970s and 1980s. The Canadian federal government has been described as the instigator of multiculturalism as an ideology because of its public emphasis on the social importance of immigration. The Canadian Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism is often referred to as the origin of modern political awareness of multiculturalism.

Canadians have used the term "multiculturalism" both descriptively (as a sociological fact) and prescriptively (as a political ideology). In the first sense "multiculturalism" is a description of the many different religious traditions and cultural influences that in their unity and coexistence in Canada make up Canadian culture. The nation consists of people from a multitude of racial, religious and cultural backgrounds and is open to cultural pluralism. Canada has experienced different waves of immigration since the nineteenth century, and by the 1980s almost 40 percent of the population were of neither British nor French origins (the two largest groups, and among the oldest). In the past, the relationship between the British and the French has been given a lot of importance in Canada's history. By the early twenty-first century, people from outside British and French heritage composed the majority of the population, with an increasing percentage of individuals who self identify as "visible minorities".

Multiculturalism is reflected in the law through the Canadian Multiculturalism Act and section 27 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and is administered by the Department of Canadian Heritage. The Broadcasting Act of 1991 asserts the Canadian broadcasting system should reflect the diversity of cultures in the country. Despite the official policies, segments of the Canadian population are critical of the concept(s) of a cultural mosaic and implementation(s) of multiculturalism legislation. Quebec's ideology differs from that of the other provinces in that its official policies focus on interculturalism."​
 

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A big difference in the new immigrant is that many of them want to ram their culture, the one that many are claiming refugee status from, down our throats. Back in the day, you might be invited to attend a cultural ceremony, to enjoy the tradition, not be offered to have your cranium removed if you don't submit to the culture.
On a regular basis I deal with first generation immigrants from Europe, Asia, Africa, India, Middle east countries like Iran, etc. By far the people who have been the most forward with their culture are those from Europe and the U.S.A. and them less so than people from the Maritimes, Quebec, or B.C.

I have to rack my brain very hard to think of any things that could be construed as having any culture rammed down my throat, especially from non-European or North American people. I hear it said constantly but I only take generalized statements for what they are worth.

As to how it was back in the day, there were places where immigrant communities had what is closer to what I might consider a "ram down your throat" than I see today. Even in Alberta in the not too distant past there were certain communities inundated by immigrants where if you weren't British, or German, or spoke French then it was something you were made aware of. Certain native communities as well, of course, were not especially trusting of outsiders. Nowadays, I wouldn't hesitate to tell my S.O. to stop at many of those communities if she needed help.

Now, as to the O.P, these extremists are a real issue just like native gangs for example. It just isn't helpful imo, to assume that either of these groups are indicative of the culture of their ethnicity in totality. Not only is it false and I believe anyone willingly holding untruth as truth is hurting themselves in the end, but it is not useful. Telling all Natives (or muslims) "You are all the same, inherently opposed to "us" on a fundamental level" is not going to bring peace to anyone.
 

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RockyMountainCanadian
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We lived way back in the bush when I was young, and everybody was part of the local community, the newer immigrants seemed happy to become Canadians, but they also celebrated their heritage. now back in the bush has paved roads and people from the city. There are still lots of immigrants that are happy to have become Canadians, but there are plenty who want to change our institutions to suit them. Seriously The RCMP having to change their dress code because of religious head gear, which according to many members of that same religion is just that they must cover their head, not wear a particular cover. a few idiots and their lawyers make life miserable for the majority. I wouldn't want to try to get help from the native communities around here, unless you are in a place of business most of them will pretend not to speak English. I doubt that any one ethnic group in general has more bad people than any other, some have some pretty weird (to us anyway) cultural habits. I really don't understand where most people get their values from anyway, definitely not the cycles of nature.
 

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Seriously The RCMP having to change their dress code because of religious head gear, which according to many members of that same religion is just that they must cover their head, not wear a particular cover. a few idiots and their lawyers make life miserable for the majority.
I guess that was an example for some people but it sure seems like a small thing, a long time ago to me. For those that saw the RCMP uniform or image as something sacrosanct it certainly must have seemed like a major affront to their cultural identity. I do wonder though if they had the same issues all the other times the dress code has changed over the years, or when they had to create uniforms for women. Personally, I could care less what they wear, as long as the uniform serves the purpose of identifying them to the agency they are working for then they can wear a toque like me, or whatever kind of ridiculous hat they thought up in the past:D



Oh, and these are RCMP too...
 

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RockyMountainCanadian
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I see a lot of little things where new mostly mid eastern immigrants seem to want concessions for their culture and or religion. I really can't think of concrete examples right now, In my own personal experience I haven't seen people from Poland for example try to mold our culture to fit them, although some don't like the amount of government in the food chain (raw milk sales for example) A persons experience is going to be highly influenced by their location and for the most part proximity to cities and the transport industry.
 

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I see a lot of little things where new mostly mid eastern immigrants seem to want concessions for their culture and or religion.
I have been doing some reading about the foundations of morality and freedoms lately. I have come to realize that although I can find examples in the many different foundations that make me feel a certain way, it is very difficult for me to come up with reasons for why something should be a concern unless it has a real effect.

Things like sanctity/degradation, while some of them may have a real meaning and gut feeling to me, only seem to matter if a person violates them to "harm" another.

For example, India is full of things that are/were considered morally wrong while they harm no one. If a woman does not change clothes entirely after defecation and before she prepares food, that is considered not unsanitary but morally wrong to many. Or if a woman sleeps in the same bed with her husband during menstruation. While I can imagine having notions like this in my head, many people think these are transgressions worthy of actual punishment, physical or otherwise.

We do, in the west, have our equivalents of these things. One example is something like this;

A woman has an old Canada/U.S flag in her house that she doesn't need anymore. She cuts it up and uses it to clean her bathroom and toilet. Nobody sees it.
Many people consider this to be morally wrong and perhaps even punishable. If they haven't already considered it their minds go into overdrive searching for reasons why when in reality it just feels wrong.
They will come up with things like the "No true Scottsman/American fallacy", etc and assume that anyone who would do this is surely doing other bad things too, but really it is just something that they consider sacred and expect others to as well.

A more ridiculous example is;

A man goes to the supermarket once a week and buys a dead chicken. But before cooking the chicken, he has sexual intercourse with it. Then he thoroughly cooks it and eats it.
It just feels wrong, but we have a hard time explaining why except that any person that does this would surely do other questionable things, but that is not a sound argument.

Anyways, this is kinda off-topic, just saying that I see your point about things such as the turban in the RCMP (or in kids soccer more recently). It just isn't a concern for me and I feel just like in the examples above, all the reasons we conjure to explain our position (safety, aesthetics, etc.) don't hold much weight in the end.

I do feel huge pressures on our culture in real ways and am very concerned for our future, but this is more a result of people who have moved here recently from other provinces for the jobs and "easy money", many of whom vocally assert that they hate this place (Alberta and Saskatchewan). That, and the fact that in the coming years the cities in this province are going to have the numbers that the provincial gov. can just ignore the rural parts of the province and many of them are public about how happy this makes them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
And another Canadian JiHadi ..

http://www.calgaryherald.com/News/o...h+school+joker+Kemptville/10451133/story.html

Path of a jihadi: How John Maguire went from a high school joker in Kemptville to an Islamic radical

Who was John Maguire before he became Canada's latest face of homegrown extremism?

On Sunday, a propaganda group linked to Islamic State released a six-minute video featuring a speaker who identified himself as Abu Anwar al-Canadi. The gaunt young man scolded the Canadian government for joining an international military coalition fighting Islamic State, referring to "the global war against the Islamic state."

Friends identified the speaker as Maguire, a University of Ottawa dropout and who was raised in Kemptville and spent a year at Hillcrest high school in Ottawa. He dropped out of sight a year ago.

In that past life, now seemingly so far away, John Maguire was a teenager whose sharp wit sometimes got him into trouble, say those who knew him. In the halls and classrooms of North Grenville District high school, Maguire was far from the strident, opinionated loner those who knew him later in life describe: He was smart, funny and sarcastic.

Maguire and a friend would routinely read the morning announcements over the school's intercom, throwing in a few inappropriate inside jokes and calling out the principal for not standing up during O Canada. He was involved in student council. He got 80s on his report card. Friends describe him as an upbeat joker, always up-to-date on current events both local and global. He had "a bit of an attitude towards authority," says one former classmate.

Former classmate Evan Massey recalled being kicked out of class with Maguire - known to his peers as "JMag" - who teased him when he struggled to read something aloud during Grade 11 English.

But Maguire also played his cards close to his chest. "He kept to himself about a lot of things that were either important or things that bugged him," Massey remembered. His parents divorced when he was in his early teens, when his love for punk rock flourished.

The young man pushed boundaries, but also laughed about those who pushed too far.

"The really punk thing to say was 'Anarchy, maaaan,'" Massey remembered. "He would make fun of that almost on the daily."

But when their senior year began, "JMag" was nowhere to be seen. He just disappeared.

Few who'd gone to school with him heard anything about him until Postmedia News reported the RCMP was investigating his presence in Syria.

His path there had many stops since Kemptville: In Grade 12 he was living with his grandparents and attending Hillcrest high school in Alta Vista. Classmates say his exit from Kemptville was abrupt and unexpected. "(Maguire) just got rid of everyone on Facebook and kinda disappeared," says one former classmate. "He never told us why."

Then, it was off to Los Angeles.

When he returned, those who were still Facebook friends noticed a status update announcing his conversion to Islam. He began studies at the University of Ottawa before buying a one-way ticket to Syria in January 2013.

The ideology Maguire expressed on social media is aligned with the Islamic State of Iraq & the Levant (ISIL), which a new UN Human Rights Council report, released Wednesday, accused of carrying out public executions - typically beheadings - to terrorize populations under their control. ISIL is also the extremist group that released the video of American journalist James Foley's beheading.

Maguire was always an "out-of-the-box" thinker and "strong-willed intellectually," said one source who knew him in high school.

"Maybe it does kind of make sense that if he fell into that world, he'd go full blast into it."

But to friend Luke Lavictoire, that intelligence and intensity usually came in the form of fervent researching to decide for himself whether he wanted to take up a cause or jump on a bandwagon.

"He definitely asks a lot of questions. He's not a dumb kid, and for someone to misguide him or mislead him, he wouldn't say 'yes' to anything," Lavictoire said. "He would make sure he had all of the answers before doing something drastic."

He remembers his friend as "ambitious."

"He wanted to do something with his life, for sure," Lavictoire said. "I still can't believe this is him."

A close friend from high school, who asked not to be identified, said he always expected Maguire to do "great things, which is why I was saddened to hear about his recent inclinations toward radical extremism," he wrote in a Facebook message to Postmedia.

"Everything that I hear about him now is honestly nothing like the JMag we knew, and from the time we spent jammin' in high school, or hanging out on the weekend, I never noticed any behaviour that would have fostered that sort of hatred towards any religious or social groups."

Maguire loved hockey perhaps even more than punk rock, the friend said. Eventually he took more of a shine to 1990s dance and hip hop music - particularly the band 2 Unlimited and Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch, but would still pick up a guitar and play classic rock or punk.

Maguire was "straight edge" in high school, Massey and Lavictoire recall - never touching alcohol or drugs, but certainly playing music in public. He was the one who started The Shackles, Massey said, inviting the young bass player to join. They played a few shows in the basement of the church, where Massey is now a pastor, and he remembers his friend having questions about faith.

"He definitely didn't know anything about God," he said.

For his part, Lavictoire wishes he could have helped "JMag" sooner.

"There are tons of things I could sit down and say, but I don't know if he'll get out alive," he said.

"It sounds like he's on a one-way street right now."
Why am I showing you this picture? This is him ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
This is John Maguire today ..

 
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