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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The familiar leaves are heart-shaped, slightly downy, especially beneath, on stalks rising alternately from a creeping rhizome ... but it is the scent that draws me to them...

I have always wildcraft when it comes to my sweet violets but as of last year my need have out grown the wild herb. (which I never take more than half.)

So this year I have added it to my herb garden. :)

Tips and recipes ...

A Violet flowers used for Syrup ... :)
 

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I have all three of Euell Gibbons books, in one of them he calls the common blue violet 'nature's vitamin pill', violets are supposedly loaded nutritionally, AND, more importantly, unlike dandelions, are not bitter at all but are actually very good to eat exactly as is, you know, like lettuce. I've actually put them on sandwiches and in salads before. The only thing quite like it would be another nutritional powerhouse - lamb's quarter, I like the raw leaves from it also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
the common blue violet 'nature's vitamin pill' (Stalking the Healthful Herbs) ... What a book I do not have!:eek: I'll have to give it a look see. (Thanks)

I have a love for (sweet) violets ... salads, sandwiches, tea and bath (etc)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have this on my list of things to grow, but for the life of me can remember why... :eek:
It could be for a number of reasons ...

The leaves and the flowers of Sweet Violet contain the medicinal properties; Sweet Violet leaves contain glucosidal principles of distant antiseptic properties. Both the leaves and the roots of Sweet Violet are used in herbal medicine. Fresh, dried Violet leaves and flowers can help with colds, sore throats and inflammation of the lungs. In aromatherapy, Violet leaves are used to treat eczema.

Sweet Violet flowers are expectorant and are used in syrups for coughs and colds; the syrup has anti-septic, anti-inflammatory, laxative and expectorant properties. The flowers are sedative and are also useful in treating headaches, insomnia, dizziness and exhaustion. Fresh Violet flowers can be used to make a scented water.

A great little herb! :flower:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The first violets are up and in bloom! :2thumb:

We picked 2 cups of blooms this afternoon to make violet honey. (YEA) Hope to get 4 cups tomorrow for violet jelly.

Temps are in the normal range so I hope they hold out till the end of the month. (That would be nice)
 

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We don't have enough blooms going yet, but I'm keeping my eye on where they're coming up.

I think I'll collect leaves to dry for teas, and with the flowers will make a simple syrup (or glycerate, not sure yet). Can't wait for the honeysuckle to get going, too! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You can't leave it there! lol

What do you use the honeysuckle for ... Come on ... I love new recipes!
 

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:)

I haven't done this yet, so I can't vouch for its effectiveness. But honeysuckle is supposed to be good for sore throats and colds, and also hot flashes. Infuse blossoms in honey or glyceryn (sp?) for two weeks in a warm location. Then strain and store, and use 1 teaspoon as needed or 1 teaspoon 3x/day, as appropriate. It's also supposed to help asthma spasms, and I am hopeful on that front (as I'd rather not use albuterol or equivalent if I can help it).

I'm also considering these recipes:
http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/sauce-spread/other-sauce-spread/honeysuckle-syrup.html
http://www.food.com/recipe/honeysuckle-sore-throat-syrup-117217?layout=desktop
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Sounds good to me! :)

I must say that hubby rolled his eyes not once but twice when I planted honeysuckle in my herb garden! lol He told me that before long he would not be able to mow the yard or use the weed eater. (Which he is right :eek:)

:D
 

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Yeah, we're totally overrun here, too. I'm really trying to eradicate the invasive non-natives (multi-flora rose and honeysuckle being to two worst), but it's an on-going project. We'll still have honeysuckle for a while. Especially where they make a nice screen in front of the crazy neighbors' house - kinda reluctant to get rid of that. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
4 cups of blooms picked for jelly... I did question hubbies 1 inch rule ... :p

One inch from old cow poo ... lol

But there you have it... 4 cups of blooms in less than 2 hours (2 people in the cow pasture ..) All jokes aside it went well. And the blooms are now waiting to be made into jelly... But the lack of scent in the bloom bothers me ... I'm thinking lack of scent, lack of flavor in the jelly ... I will see. (and I hope I'm wrong)

Time will tell. ( I do have a very nice color for now)
 

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Yeah, 1" seems a little... um.... close. :eek: :D

I'd have the same thoughts regarding scent and taste - it will be interesting to hear how it turns out! (I'm thinking it's going to be yummy ;) )

Heading over to see Mom tomorrow, and pick some violets. I have no clue how long it will take to get a decent amount - I'm a fish out of water with no experience with this sort of thing whatsoever - can't wait to change that. (Time for me to stop reading about herbs and just start doing!) :)
 

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...Violet flowers used for Syrup ... :)
Could you post the exact botanical name for the violets you have planted? There are several varieties and I've been wanting to plant the best ones for using in foods and medicines.

Will they grow in shady areas?
 

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take fresh picked flowers and wash them. (get dirt off) dip them in egg white or corn syrup and sprinkle them with sugar. you can put them on a cake or eat them straight. try them on a glass of tea or sprite.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Could you post the exact botanical name for the violets you have planted? There are several varieties and I've been wanting to plant the best ones for using in foods and medicines.

Will they grow in shady areas?
Viola odorata

V. odorata can be distinguished by the following characteristics:
the flowers are aromatic,[1]
the flowers are normally either dark violet or white,
the leaves and flowers are all in a basal rosette,
the style is hooked (and does not end with a rounded appendage),
the leaf-stalks have hairs which point downwards, and
the plant spreads with stolons (above-ground shoots).

These perennial flowers can mature at a height of 4 to 6 inches and a spread of 8 to 24 inches.[1] The species can be found near the edges of forests or in clearings; it is also a common "uninvited guest" in shaded lawns or elsewhere in gardens.

From wiki ...

But on a side note: Mine were not very aromatic this year ... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Violet jelly is done ... Had the camera out to take pictures and forgot. :eek:

But it turned out rather nice and I am pleased. :flower: The recipe I used had more sugar than I like but ... It is a very lovely light-tasting jelly, that is both beautiful and yummy.
 

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Hey Andi, how do you do your violet honey? And how do you store it? Everything I've read said to store syrup (honey or sugar, either one) in the fridge, but I'm hoping to be able to can something and put it on the basement shelf... (I would think it could be water bath canned, but does that negate the health benefits of the honey?)

Also, are you using your steam juicer for any of your herbal recipes?

Thank you for being such a wealth of information. :)
 

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Viola odorata

V. odorata can be distinguished by the following characteristics:
the flowers are aromatic,[1]
the flowers are normally either dark violet or white,
the leaves and flowers are all in a basal rosette,
the style is hooked (and does not end with a rounded appendage),
the leaf-stalks have hairs which point downwards, and
the plant spreads with stolons (above-ground shoots).

These perennial flowers can mature at a height of 4 to 6 inches and a spread of 8 to 24 inches.[1] The species can be found near the edges of forests or in clearings; it is also a common "uninvited guest" in shaded lawns or elsewhere in gardens.

From wiki ...

But on a side note: Mine were not very aromatic this year ... ;)
very much for starting this thread, I had forgotten my plans to plant Sweet Violet in the shady bed, what with one thing and another, but now, Thanks to you, I've ordered the seeds and will start weeding that bed in prep for them!
I'm so excited!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hey Andi, how do you do your violet honey? And how do you store it? Everything I've read said to store syrup (honey or sugar, either one) in the fridge, but I'm hoping to be able to can something and put it on the basement shelf... (I would think it could be water bath canned, but does that negate the health benefits of the honey?)

Also, are you using your steam juicer for any of your herbal recipes?

Thank you for being such a wealth of information. :)
My violet honey still needs to infuse till the 27th (in a warm place) then it will as honey ... last indefinitely.(but) Yes, the syrup need to be in the fridge.

The steam juicer I use for cranberry juice or a blend of. That is about it for now.

I love to talk about herbs ... so, for me grand its to have someone to talk with about them. :D (Thanks to you and the others)
 
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