Storing Antibiotics?

Discussion in 'Health & Medicine' started by Robin-Hood, Mar 30, 2012.

  1. Robin-Hood

    Robin-Hood Member

    8
    0
    Hey guys. Haven't been very active here, at all. Things have been busy.

    Anyway, I managed to acquire some prescription antibiotics for my bug out bag. Capsules as well as cream for external use. More specifically Flucloxacillin, a penicillin 'class' antibiotic with properties which make it work against penicillin resistant bacteria. A pretty handy addition if you ask me.

    Anyway I know it says on the label to store them in a cool dry place, which led me to deciding in my go bag was probably a bad place to keep them. But I figured this is probably meant for short term storage, while they're being administered. So what about long term storage? I figured this would be a logical place to ask.

    Are there any precautions I should take for storing them long term? Or will they expire regardless? There is no expiry date listed on the label or packaging. :dunno:
     
  2. goatlady

    goatlady Well-Known Member

    256
    2
    I was advised by several docs that it extends the life of any capsule, tablets, or powder to basically vacuum pack and store in a freezer. That basically stops any degrading of the medication, so when it is taken out and used THEN the time to expiration starts BUT those expiration dates are just best estimates by the manufacturer to meet federal labeling requirements. Most meds are good years past the stated expiration date, so I have been told by folks I trust to know.
     

  3. BlueZ

    BlueZ Well-Known Member

    2,224
    187
    if stored cool ( or cold) they will last for years but they ALL will degrade at some point.
    Where that point is is hard to predict..

    I still have a 2 yr old Z pack in my refrigerator but by now i would not trust it 100%..
     
  4. TheSurvivalDoctor

    TheSurvivalDoctor Well-Known Member

    68
    0
    I agree with all the comments. In a have-to situation antibiotics should last, comfortably, for a year after expiration-probably much longer. Store them in a cool and dry spot. Having them sealed in the original manufacturer's packaging is best. Extreme ups and downs in temperature might adversely effect the chemistry.
     
  5. k0xxx

    k0xxx Supporting Member

    885
    3
    We had a doctor talk to our group, and this was one of the things that he said to do. He said that he personally does this, and he has one of the Sundanzer solar/battery freezers specifically for this purpose.
     
  6. Robin-Hood

    Robin-Hood Member

    8
    0
    Okay thanks guys. I thought sticking them in the fridge might damage them 'cause of the humidity levels, but obviously they're in a sealed package so that was a pretty hurr durr moment. :p
    What about the cream? Think I should just leave it in the medicine cabinet? I'm not sure freezing that would be such a good idea.
     
  7. goatlady

    goatlady Well-Known Member

    256
    2
    any cream or lotion is going to have a short life prinarily because of the oil base which breaks down pretty guickly. May be the fridge would help some to extend.
     
  8. TheSurvivalDoctor

    TheSurvivalDoctor Well-Known Member

    68
    0
    Yeah, forgot to mention the cream. Good point, goatlady.
     
  9. efbjr

    efbjr Well-Known Member

    260
    1
    Insulin...

    I have had an unopened vial of my wife's insulin in the refrigerator for the last 3 years (she was switched to a different type). Is it still usable? :confused:
     
  10. Hi Everyone!

    It's nice to join your group, I hope Dr. Bones and I can provide some guidance in medical preparedness. We have been involved with this issue for a logtime and are dedicated to answering any questions you may have. I am an Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner and Joe (Bones) has been a MD and surgeon for over 35 years. We spend our days writing and researching solutions to help others learn medical preparedness. It is our mission and goal to help as many people as possible.

    Our article on shelf-life may be interesting to you:
    http://www.doomandbloom.net/2011/10/the-truth-about-expiration-dates.html

    Thanks,
    Nurse Amy
    doomandbloomdotnet
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 14, 2012
  11. Hi John,

    I didn't respond with the uses for antibiotics because this thread says "storing antibiotics", but we have all of that info also, if you are looking for it.

    Kevin from Truth is Treason (a friend) asked us if he could use our articles to write that (see the last few paragraphs where he talks about Joseph Alton M.D., that is my husband aka Dr. Bones), it is a summary of several different articles we have on our site. If you want more details on antibiotic uses, we have a 4 part, very detailed, series, written in November.

    Here is the first one:
    http://www.doomandbloom.net/2011/11/antibiotics-and-their-use-in-collapse-medicinetm-part-1.html

    If you have any other questions, please feel free to ask. I have started a thread for fish antibiotics and antibiotic uses, so it is under one thread, and easy to research.

    Thanks,
    Nurse Amy
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 14, 2012
  12. Gypsy5

    Gypsy5 New Member

    1
    0
    Hi Folks,
    I am new here. I have a little change to toss in the pile. Antibiotics can be kept at a normal room temp or cooler for years. I have all my antibiotics under my bed in a plastic tote and they are as good now as they were four years ago. My house is kept at 68 degrees constantly. I did not always do this but several years ago my hubby became very sick and had no insurance or money. I had a seven year old bottle of Cipro stuck back. I got online and found an article about a government study on Antibiotics from the cold war days. The last test done a bottle of Keflex or it may have been Penecillin show it was beginning to mildly lose its potency. That bottle was 17years old in the early 70's. I have not been able to find that article again but I still look when I think about it. I gave Ty the ones I had and he was up and around in a couple of days. I know the expiration dates are more for safety or resales than for any other reason. Don't take me literally, though, keep researching. I also have some PDF's on Natural Medicine if I can get them to attach. You can also get free PDF
    s at Scribd (well worth the trouble).
     
  13. kirklandwater

    kirklandwater New Member

    2
    0
    How about Monolaurin

    someone told me that Monolaurin is a very good.
     
  14. Padre

    Padre The Black Pilgrim

    1,339
    9
    Cool dry does not necessarily mean a freezer. I have been warned that freezing some drugs can actually hasten their degradation.