Stashing is a good idea

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by sinbad, Oct 30, 2009.

  1. sinbad

    sinbad Well-Known Member

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    Forgive me if this has been discussed earlier . This is the type of inconvenience you get whener you have newer members LOL.

    OK the subject is gathering a few prepredness items and hiding them somewhere ( other than your house) for future use. I have a bag in my office locker that has flashlight, battries, multitool, SAK. In addition i have a drawer full of food / drink ( bottled water , tea. coffee, biscuits, fast food packets of salt pepper sugar ..etc. )

    Off course the tea/coffee I have are consumed almost regularly and then I just add more. Except the multitool and few others, most the stuff is used and rotated.

    So, do you go that far in planning your preparedness or do you think it is too far ?
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2009
  2. northernontario

    northernontario Well-Known Member

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    I haven't gone that far... but I don't think it's crazy. At previous jobs, I've kept a few items in the desk for when I need a quick snack. Just have to balance things... your employer may not appreciate you filling your desk drawers with food!
     

  3. bunkerbob

    bunkerbob Supporting Member

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    I think you are smart to prepare this way:2thumb:. I have a large parachute bag in each vehicle with MREs(freeze dried & regular), water, clothes, boots, even NBC equipment, decom gear, sealed carbon overgarment, gloves, N100 masks, MCU 2/p mask, hood, extra in date filters, on and on. This with HAM radio gear, pre-tuned to local repeaters and private channels. Even a large pepper spray canister. Now this may be over doing it.
     
  4. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    Being prepared means having a stash of supplies available, no matter where you are.

    In my office, I have a large plastic tool-box under my desk that has cutlery and camp-dishes, porridge-packets, granola-bars, ichiban-noodles, tea, etc. On my desk, I have a simple electric water-pot that I boil water in to make my lunches / breakfast. I used to have a toaster-oven at my desk as well, but, things were changed around and I didn't have room for that anymore. It was great for bagels, pizza-pockets, etc.

    Our kitchenette only has coffee-pots, a sink, microwave and a fridge. I don't use nuker's (at all) so, for a good hot meal, I need to do things differently.

    In my Jeep I have a set of saddle-bags mounted that hold winter and summer supplies - from gloves to food and I have pre-made emergency-kits as well in there (first-aid, tow-ropes, jumper-cables, etc) - not counting things like my mechanics-gloves, flashlights, etc.

    You can be "over prepared" in a vehicle - and end up wasting huge amounts of fuel hauling it all around all the time or you can be "just prepared enough" that the weight of the extra gear does not impact fuel-milage significantly.
     
  5. sailaway

    sailaway Well-Known Member

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    I keep a BOB in my office along with a 2 day supply of canned food, peel off lids. My main survival equiptment stash is near by so I can get to it and take what I need and get out easily.
     
  6. youpock

    youpock Well-Known Member

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    Ha! I got all of you beat, I got laid off so all of my supplies are at home! : )
     
  7. bunkerbob

    bunkerbob Supporting Member

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    Now wait a minute, first of all sorry you got laid off, second I'm retired, home all the time, spend part of day in bunker expanding it. Now that the weather has cooled off and will not have to spend as many hours working in the garden I will start reloading again to. My wife(sugar momma, with respect) works still though, shes the one I have to keep prepared for mobile situations.
     
  8. Canadian

    Canadian Well-Known Member

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    Being prepared is always good. I keep some gear in the car. If I'm out of the house there's a 90% chance I'm in the car anyway. If I'm on foot I'm usually just down the street.

    On occasion I take the subway downtown. Even then I can walk home from the lake in about four hours. I've done it when I didn't feel like dealing with the drunks on the night bus.
     
  9. Consider all the time you spend away from your home and storage. Having a stash of supplies in your car, office, for your kids at school are great preparedness measures.

    I recommend for ladies to have a pair of walking shoes as well, because image something catastrophic occuring on a day you're in a pair of heels? That would not be fun.

    This is also one reason that I encourage people to have a concealed firearm permit and the skills to defend yourself should you need to. I always carry my pepper spray, asp, knife and firearm on me, just in case.
     
  10. Chemechie

    Chemechie Member

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    Preparedness: A way of Life

    I agree with the other responses: While many people plan for an 'end of society' situation, they often overlook 'smaller' but still significant events such as the following:
    1. A car running off the road in a rural area in the winter (particularly bad in mountainous or really cold areas). Each year people are found days or weeks after running off the road during their normal commute. I keep food, water, and a sleeping bag in my car for situations like this.
    2. Power outages such as the 2003 event in the Northeast US where mass transit was down due to no power. TV stations carried videos of thousands of Manhattan workers walking home, blocking roads and preventing vehicle traffic. Like mentioned previously, have good shoes with you when you travel or commute in case you need to walk.
    3. Traffic jams/ accidents: Does your daily commute depend on 1 or 2 roads with heavy traffic? Do you know alternate routes? About 3 years ago, south of Baltimore where I-895 and I-95 cross, a large truck plunged off of the upper road (I think it was 895) and onto the lower road - into a gasoline tanker! Multiple vehicles were consumed in the ensuing fire, shutting both roads down for days. Traffic in the area was snarled for days and those who knew alternate routes saved themselves lots of time.
    4. Shelter in place situations (Terrorist attacks/ fires/ hostage situations/ etc). On April 4, 2009 a gunman entered an immigration center in Binghamton NY and shot 14 people. In the ensuing uncertainty, several square blocks nearby were under lockdown - if you didn't have lunch in your office, you went hungry. While this what if this had gone for days? During the Mumbai attacks in November 2008, people hid in hotels and office buildings for up to 3 days until it was certain all of the terrorists were dead or captured.

    While "stuff" helps, it is not things that determine how you will do in these situations - it is the mindset and skills to not panic and make use of available resources. Start thinking about how you would respond in these situations (to start with), and add the natural disasters, crimes, and terrorist attacks that make the news. If you can think clearly and not panic you will be ahead of 95% of people.
    Just my $.02 - feel free to respond with your thoughts.
     
  11. sinbad

    sinbad Well-Known Member

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    Employers are not the same, and every situation is different. My employer is too busy focused on money flow to notice a few biscuits or granola bars in my desk drawers. YMMV.

    I agree 100% , but "stuff" can help you and give you more options.
    For example, in my small bag of tricks in the office, I have some emergency cash in small bills and change. In case I have to stay for a few days I don't only rely on stashed foods but can utilize vending machines (if power is till available). This option IMO is not available to many pople around who depend on cards or bigger bills.
     
  12. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    Last winter we had a city-wide power-outtage that lasted most of the day. Gas stations could not pump gas or take interact-payments, coffee-shops could not make coffee and I was unable to run my saw that day at my friend's house to help them put in a new floor. It ended up being a relaxing day with friends instead of doing the stuff we were supposed to do, but, that day reminded me that having cash-n-coin will make the difference when I cannot access my money via debit-card ..

    I don't hide my money (or stash it) because it is too easy to forget / loose / etc - so I just keep enough to cover a tank of gas plus snacks from the local gas-station / convenience-store.
     
  13. sailaway

    sailaway Well-Known Member

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    I like keeping $100.00 around when I have it, lately I haven't. My campaign has cost around $3,000.00, I have only raised about $1,000.00. The rest is on a 26% interest credit card, I'm trying to figure out what to sell to cover that. I've flipped a couple muzzle loaders but that hasn't raised much. I do save all of my change for a rainy day, that is for emergencys, I have about 1/2 gallon. enough dribble
     
  14. SurvivalNut

    SurvivalNut Retired Army

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    Vote for sailaway!

    SAILAWAY, I'd be happy to donate $50 to your campaign fund if you have a paypal account. I know the election is already here, but I'd like to help.

    I also encourage/ challenge other forum members to kick in a buck or two.

    We should all support family.

    What say we?
     
  15. Jason

    Jason I am a little teapot

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    What's your mailing adress, dude? I'm good for $20. I'd like to do more, but times are what they are and I got a little mouth to feed.

    Set up a post office box or something. :)
     
  16. Great thoughts, Chemechie. Having some snacks in your desk at work is a great idea. It isn't just "the big one" that we're preparing for, but the unexpected. Being prepared will make it a much less stressful experience.
     
  17. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    I just remember'd this thread. I figure that I can put a couple of pictures of my lunch-box that I keep under my desk at work. In it (today as I re-filled it) I have 10 packs of noodles (and a bowl for the noodles to cook in), 50 granola bars (of different styles), hard-candies, granola cereal (I eat it as a snack - dry), peanuts, hazelnuts, mixed dried fruit, gum, mini-chocolates, quick-oats, hot-chocolate .... etc.

    I compliment the stored goodies with fresh food that I bring with me each morning (fruit, sandwich, left-overs, etc).
     

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  18. TimB

    TimB Member

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    That's a heckuva lunchbox, NaeKid. ;) :D Beyond taking extra snacks w/ my lunch to work, I don't worry too much about it. I'm fortunate that I work only 4 1/2 miles from home. Now when we travel, that's another story. :D My wife used to ask me how many people were coming with us. :p

    Tim
     
  19. sinbad

    sinbad Well-Known Member

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    Naekid

    You add a new meaning to a "toolbox".
    LOL

    I have thought of using a tool box for a first aid kit, but never thought of using one for lunchbox.

    Thanks for the pics
     
  20. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    At home I have a tool-box setup as a first-aid kit, it works very well residing under the bathroom sink. Don't need to hold back on the idea of a tool-box being turned into a first-aid kit, if you think that it would do the trick, go ahead and do it.

    I use plastic tool boxes for the lighter weight.