spreading awareness

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by ceilinghobo, Oct 16, 2008.

  1. ceilinghobo

    ceilinghobo Guest

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    Does anyone have any suggestions on ways to spread awareness to their neighbors and others that they should be more prepared?
     
  2. Smithy

    Smithy Outdoorsman, Bladesmith

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    Sadly, the best way I know to get the point across, is to be prepared during a time of hardship, in contrast to their unprepared lifestyle. Last time we were without water for a week (power outage at the water treatment plant) we were not only fine on our own, conserving wasteful use through eating on paper and doing other dishes in a more spartan fashion, and giving the kids "bird baths"... we were able to share some of our water with our elderly neighbors. The stores were sold out by day 2, and this went on for nearly a week, IIRC. We certainly couldn't take care of all their needs, but a case of bottled water meant a lot to an old couple who weren't going to drive 4 or 5 hours to get resupplied.
     

  3. Smithy

    Smithy Outdoorsman, Bladesmith

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    I'm sorry... that sounded really trite.

    More positive suggestion: Host a preparedness event with your church, and invite the community. Ours has been doing this for some time, and word slowly spreads. I would avoid opening your home, though, because if everyone knows you're well stocked, and the **** really does hit the fan, you become more of a target than a resource partner. This came up on another forum I'm on, and some rather trite responses of "go to a Mormon church, and follow a couple of them home, and write down the addresses. That's where the food will be" really got me thinking... low profile is best.

    I know of a couple people very active in our community, that focus almost exclusively on emergency preparedness, and are always fighting the uphill battle. It's hard to put away for tomorrow, when you're busy living for today. I think that mentality is prevelant in America today, and explains many of our cultural, financial, and personal problems. Wise investment in the future is not our strong suit, as a nation. That's why there's only 235 people on this board, instead of thousands and thousands.


    Bottom line, be a good example to your neighbors. Don't be afraid to talk about "putting things away for tomorrow", or preparedness in general. The Armegeddon Freak Flag will turn people off, but there's hundreds of legitimate reasons to stock up... minor natural disasters are the easist to discuss, and many people have experienced a few days with the power off, or the water off, or the stores out of bread and toilet paper. Start with that, and progress. Have family nights where you reorganize the pantry, or work on your 72-hour kits, and make the notion of preparedness a fun and open topic at home... they'll end up spreading the word through their own friends, magnifying the message. Make survival cool, easy to do with young men in the home, through Scouts and other High Adventure. If you have insolent teenagers like me, appeal to their desire for independance by showing how good preparation leads to independance from "the system" or "the man", especially in times of crisis.

    Good luck.
     
  4. gds

    gds Well-Known Member

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    I didn't think your first post sounded trite, it just didn't really answer the original post.
    Now your second post was outstanding.:D Especially coming from the bastion of socialism, D.C.
     
  5. TechAdmin

    TechAdmin Administrator Staff Member

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    I think passing out websites like this and others is a good start to showing people there are family oriented level headed Americans who are taking on the subject seriously without the fringe touch.
     
  6. gds

    gds Well-Known Member

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    Hmm , I'm pretty sure I detect a note of socialism/communism in the above quote. "passing out websites like this and others is a good start to showing people".
    Passing out, was that a poor choice of words or an intentional click to dull the mind and make people get used to having things passed out to them??:p

    The fringe is always there. Everyone is on the fringe, depending upon who you ask and what subject you ask about.
     
  7. JeepHammer

    JeepHammer Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Dean...

    I have 'Neighbors', 'Friends' & most of the rest are 'Folks' around me.
    They have different political, religious & sports views than me.

    They are different colors, race mixes, sexual orientations and drive different cars than me.

    They at least 'Tolerate' me, and I show them the same respect.

    When we flooded out this spring, everyone pulled together to get the old folks out of the nursing homes, feed the sand baggers and rescue workers, and shelter the 'Refugees'.

    Was it too much for the residents of the community they have lived in and contributed all their lives to...
    To ask for help?

    HELL NO! And I was glad to do it, along with everyone else around here.
    Call our community effort 'Socialism' or what ever, I don't care!

    It's what we call 'Being Neighborly',
    AND,
    gds, if you don't like that, then find someplace else to spew your venom and rhetoric, because I'm already tired of it.
    I'm sick of the sideways comments, the insults, the snark, the far right wing fringe rants and the degradation you throw at others.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2008
  8. JeepHammer

    JeepHammer Well-Known Member

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    Sorry about that Ceilinghobo, I didn't mean to burn a hole in your thread...

    During the flood, we were without potable water (boil order 2 weeks) and electricity for 6 days.

    I have solar panels that run the house in the day time, and a generator we used every couple of hours at night.

    I stored medicine and baby food for neighbors in my WORKING fridge, and we put up some of the people that weren't above water, but wanted to stay in the neighborhood.
    Mostly people with medical conditions that couldn't take the heat, like heart patients, that could help out in the house with A/C.

    We let the reachable neighbors plug into extension cords from the generator, rotating so everyone reachable could cool down the fridge and have lights for a few hours a day.

    That was in June, and to my knowledge, not one single neighbor has installed a solar panel, purchased a generator, installed a drinking water filter or made any effort to store emergency supplies.

    Back in '90, a tornado came along and simply REMOVED the town to the south of us.
    Virtually everyone rebuilt, and I know a bunch of people there, but ABSOLUTELY NO ONE I KNOW installed a 'Safe Room' or storm shelter when they rebuilt,
    Even though the federal assistance and insurance companies would have paid 100% of the cost to have them installed or built.

    While I was living in the Fla. Keys, we would get 5 or 6 hurricane or tropical storms a year, but way less than 10% the homes had generators or fresh water storage...
    AND,
    They would all show up at the house with the lights on after the power was out, and expect you to put them up until after the storm and until the power/water was back on!

    I don't mind working WITH my community,
    But my granddad had a saying for this,
    "You can lead a horse to water, But he'll still sh!t on his heels!"
    Do what you can, and don't worry about the rest, they will have to take care of themselves...
     
  9. gds

    gds Well-Known Member

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    Dang JH,
    aren't you quite the ornery old gray headed fat bellied American.:D
    So am I.

    "It's what we call 'Being Neighborly',
    AND,
    gds, if you don't like that, then find someplace else to spew your venom and rhetoric, because I'm already tired of it.
    I'm sick of the sideways comments, the insults, the snark, the far right wing fringe rants and the degradation you throw at others."

    Well now, are you done repositioning your feminine products? Last time I checked, I still live in the US, the same US that I gave 8 yrs of service to.
    To ensure you ,me, and everyone else that is an American citizen the right to voice their opinion.
    I think if you stop reading INTO my posts and except them for what they are,maybe you will not be so hostile.

    I'm not sure what:"sideways comments" and "the snark" mean.
    I am pretty sure you are the only one on this forum that goes on multiple paragraph rants, far right wing or otherwise.


    YOU SAID,
    "I don't mind working WITH my community,
    But my granddad had a saying for this,
    "You can lead a horse to water, But he'll still sh!t on his heels!"
    Do what you can, and don't worry about the rest, they will have to take care of themselves..."

    My point exactly! And if I understand the premise of this forum correctly, your granddad could of been an inspiration to this forum. What happened to you?:confused:
    To bad you didn't really understand what granddad was saying.

    Try and stay strong little man,granddads watching.


    I want to apologize in advance to anyone that reads this absurd interaction between me and JeepHammer.
    This site is about being prepared. That is what i attempt to do, share my knowledge. Weather that be, tools, structures, weapons, or just living.
    The bottom line is, make it happen.;)
     
  10. JW Parker

    JW Parker Keep Your SP101 Handy!

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    I always stay prepared and I tell people about websites like this on all the time. I tell people that I keep a couple cans of spam and some tuna in the cabnet just in case. I don't let them know that I have enough food and supplies to last months. From what they hear, I am working toward building a plan to store a couple weeks worth of supplies.
     
  11. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    When I talked to my step-mom and dad about being "prepared for the worst" but "living for now" she said that society will always band together to help each other. When I tried to point out to her the crap that went on during the hurricanes in the south - she said that is US stuff - not Canadian stuff. I told her that my plans for the future included a "bug-out zone" - a piece of land to own away from the city that if the SHTF I can get the hell outta dodge and continue my existence - and she was basically callin' me crazy.

    I told her that if there are problems that I would prefer to be self-sufficient instead of relying on the utilities and police "protection". She believes that in a case of emergency that there will still be food on the shelves, water in the pipes and that she will be safe because the police will be there to save her ..

    If I can't convince my step-mom (who I love) that taking a few extra steps to protect herself - how the hell will I be able to get my neighbors to prepare for anything????
     
  12. TechAdmin

    TechAdmin Administrator Staff Member

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    It's tough. People have become so reliant on current living that their minds can't fathom a situation where there would be no fuel or food. Even if everyone banded together we have limited food supplies in every city and limited local growing. If a large area disaster happened Red Cross and other groups couldn't get aid to everyone instantly.
     
  13. Lake Lady

    Lake Lady Member

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    I have tried to tell friends to prepare..........they all look at me as if I've got a 3rd eye on my forehead :( I've explained that it could be a tornado, Wolf Creek Dam could let go (it's leaking) and take out the utilities, and ice storm could also take out the utilites as well as a terrorist attack or a financial melt down. No one has listened to me except the elderly couple across the street. When something happens I will get no pleasure out of saying 'I told you so'.
     
  14. JW Parker

    JW Parker Keep Your SP101 Handy!

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    Actually I think that if I can get someone to stock two weeks worth of supplies they will get the idea that more is better.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2008
  15. Blister

    Blister Active Member

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    I have found that actually "trying" to convince someone they should be prepared is somewhat of a turn-off to many folks. Some are just fine financially and only a true disaster or true loss (BIG loss) will change that.

    It's kinda like when we were all growing up and our parents were boring us to death saying all those words of wisdom we never listened to. Then, something happens and some consequences have to be paid and suddenly we realize they were right.

    Most folks learn by example, whether it's seeing their parents do something or paying serious consequences. If someone isn't hurting and has not been in need, putting away tuna fish, beans and canning your own vegetables seems like fringe behavior to them. They haven't known need and can't identify. They may even say it's good thinking but don't actually do it.
     
  16. TechAdmin

    TechAdmin Administrator Staff Member

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    It's real unfortunate but true. I hope communities like this one will turn more people on. It's more private and family oriented.

    I've seen what a little scare can do to a town, Hurricane warning, grocery and gas were wiped clean. What if supply lines were cut and it couldn't be restocked right away. Instant panic.
     
  17. Biscuit

    Biscuit Member

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    I think the best approach is that of one to be prepared for the possibility of a weather or natural disaster. It's something that most people can relate to, and can see the possibilities of it happening.

    Anything more "dire" or widespread than that...most people don't want to acknowledge is a possibility, so they pretend it just can't ever happen.

    But being prepared for a few days of food, etc...seems sensible to most people.
     
  18. Biscuit

    Biscuit Member

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    After the events of the last year in this country, you'd think being prepared would be a priority, eh?
     
  19. kbscobravert

    kbscobravert New Member

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    I am new to the site and have a few friends that discuss the needs for preps and what not but none have done anything that I know of yet. I have a few friends also that well may be a little on the nuts side and closed minded but they are on the side that says be prepared now not later (most of their preps are guns and ammo).

    I would like to think that I am going to be the one that change the mindset of my family and friends. I don't live in the States at the time being but my wife (well, wife in 56 days) does. I have slid small suggestions to her about being prepared for anything weather it be a tragic gunman in a mall type setting or just keeping the trucks full of fuel and extra water on hand.

    My plans are to move back home next year (Sept '09) from Afghanistan and continue to live in the house the wife already has. I want to purchase 20-30 acres and spend a few months off of work to build it up with the bare basics first and expand on them as time goes on. I would like to incorporate my family and friends into my fold slowly by encouraging them to lend a hand and let them form their own opinions as to weather it is for them or not. I have no doubt that once they start to help and the discussions come up they will see things the way I and the most of you do.

    But....

    I think if I come home and start asking where all their supplies are and how come they are not ready for any sort of disaster time living I might be the next new nut in their eyes. Instead of forcing it on them I will simply let it soak into them by osmosis of sorts.

    Great site by the way. I have tons of questions.
     
  20. wildman800

    wildman800 Well-Known Member

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    I believe, the best way to spread awareness and knowledge is through the means that have been used during the past few years.

    The Fed has been promoting it, some MSM does occassional articles that aren't totally pointed at ridiculing those who are preparing (still rare to see), but that gets a few more folks thinking about preparedness. Then there are websites like this one that folks are coming to in their search for answers in a somewhat anonymous fashion.

    Even those of us who have been long-time "preparationists" have learned that this is a topic that is limited in it's scope of sharing with one's neighbors. We all have neighbors that we can talk to regarding some subjects and there are those neighbors that we can occassionally discuss this subject with.

    Most of us have 1 or more elderly neighbors that we will pump for informational regarding old methods and customs. Most of us are prepared to help those neighbors and maybe 1 or 2 others, depending on their personal circumstances.

    I have found it now to be approaching the point where preparation discussions are dangerous to have with the neighbors. They are too close and they can or will become a major liability if TSHTF.

    That's my viewpoint, take it for what you think it may be worth,,,,,or worthless!