So, today, are you ready for this 2

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by pdx210, Jan 19, 2010.

  1. pdx210

    pdx210 Well-Known Member

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    secanario ....wake up tomorrow and oil production/ imports cut by 50% due to some geopolitical issues causes (not important) In the foreseeable future 1 + years or more we will need to live with 50% less oil .... the life we knew is gone for several years if it every really returns. all elements of modern life are effected

    -transportation of people, materials and food
    -emergency services hindered
    -goods such as ..plastics, inks, dyes,
    -industrial, detergents, fertilizers, pesticides, medicines

    The easy life is over prices immediately start skyrocketing on everything

    1, Do you bug out, can your bug out location support you for extended periods of time

    2, you have all your prep but anything you would alter in your current routine buy or stock up on


    3, As your pondering this the radio broadcast is interrupted martial law has been declared all resources energies, food & materials are nationalized, stores shut and guarded hording is illegal. Personal travel in autos/ motorcycles is restricted.



    welcome to day one, what's your plan/ strategy ?
     
  2. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like basic services such as electric, media outlets(for what they're worth) internet and phone are still intact.
    I believe there would be a lot of security concerns in the city first, giving me time to bury a lot of our food reserves and unregistered defence capabilities. I'm not sure what I would do with the 2 tanks of diesel. They're above ground and full. I'll need to give that some thought. :scratch I guess I would have to build some type of cart or small wagon for the horses or donkey's to haul things in order to conserve what fuel is available. Maybe even a small cart to put the goats to work.
    Other than that, we would go on with life much as we normally do. I have a lot of pre-petro farm implements and wood processing tools so the garden would get planted and firewood would get cut. We have our goats and chickens which may need guarded a little more closely as milk and eggs could become high demand items which would put us in an enviable position. It would definitely get me to finish the solar dehydrator that has been in the shed for nearly 2 years. :rolleyes:
    In general, living under the radar and not drawing attention to ourselves would be paramount although living an a small farm might make that problematic. :dunno:
     

  3. pdx210

    pdx210 Well-Known Member

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    sounds like you'd do well. Many states requires some type of permit for fuel storage in a desperate situation local government could pull the records from fuel vendors and show up on your property to nationalize your fuel supply.


    So....Choices must be made we likely won't be the ones making them there would be power outages even though we have coal it must be transported to plants by trains that run on diesel. Natural gas requires electricity to transport and move it to homes. all theses systems require parts & human maintenance by people that have little if any fuel to do so. oil is used to transport oil and grow & transporting food, electricity, sanitation systems, WATER, police and rescue services can't respond to many calls so how long before lawlessness? something/someone looses. How will prisons feed the massive population of prisoners..how will guards get to and from work. what will those already at the bottom of society do...poor, desperate, gang members do ?

    This is day one, America has about 20-45 day reserve of oil how long until the desperation set in how long until the panic of hunger ?
     
  4. kyfarmer

    kyfarmer Well-Known Member

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    I think the loss of services will be a blow but the hunger thing will set things bad.
     
  5. pdx210

    pdx210 Well-Known Member

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    A loss of any service can be tolerated for a time what happens in a city with high density housing 15-20 story condo buildings and the power goes out for good. no elevators, no water, for many no heat, Air conditioning.

    look at New Orleans it took no time for lawlessness, looting and it wasn't a nationwide event or Haiti no time at all
     
  6. TechAdmin

    TechAdmin Administrator Staff Member

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    Bunker Down and Wait the first few days out. My bug out and my home are one in the same. Other than than that it would be a while before I felt any effect minus the interruption in services. Martial Law? Well what can you do?
     
  7. Expeditioner

    Expeditioner Well-Known Member

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    Depends on how people in my area act. There are so many possible scenarios that it is mind blowing. I can BIP or BO depending on the sitaution at the time.
     
  8. allen_idaho

    allen_idaho Well-Known Member

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    I think Step 1 would be protecting the gas tank on my cars. If somebody wanted to get rich quick, they would come alone in the middle of the night, punch a hole in the bottom of the tank and drain off whatever I've got left in there. Then I'm both out of gas and stuck with a useless vehicle until it is repaired.

    Step 2 would be completing a large methane digester. That way I can take human waste, animal waste, and food waste, and turn them into fuel and fertilizer.

    Step 3 would be increasing the size of my crops. I have plenty of meat in the freezer and out walking around the pasture to go with it.

    So while all of these prices skyrocket, I think I would still be relatively self-sufficient. I just wouldn't have the usual supply of junk food around the house.
     
  9. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    Stay home...

    Wouldn't affect us much initially. W'd try to get the kids to start bringing supplies, etc. to the home place (especialy livestock because it's harder to move) just in case. You're going to have a lag time before panic sets in and even then it will depend upon the government response to the situation. If food and other essentials continue without interruption (which could still be done at 50%) there might be some hardship but it would be survivable. The key is public perception and reaction.

    I pity anyone, gov't. or otherwise, who tries to confiscate supplies, guns, etc. in this corner of America.
     
  10. pdx210

    pdx210 Well-Known Member

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    Nuclear war is survivable too at 50% there's system shock. our food system is heavily Dependant on oil so the cost of growing food skyrockets not to mention getting it to market. the plethora of jobs that require fuel ..getting raw materials to a construction job site , UPS driver, plumber, electrician,


    Those of you on farms how will you protect your resources in the middle of the night we all have to sleep some time have you figured out a security system?
     
  11. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    Early warning?
    7 dogs. :D
    4 roosters that crow in the middle of the night if something is amiss.

    It's a start :rolleyes:
     
  12. pdx210

    pdx210 Well-Known Member

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    better than a tin can,filled with rocks, tied to a string !
     
  13. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    Night watch-dog

    The dog has security duty. She's pretty good to. I can tell the difference between "animal" and "people"" when she announces an arrival. Out here you almost have to have a dog just to keep the wildlife out of the yard and the chickens safe.

    We've had wolves, bears, mountain lions, coyotes, elk and moose within 100 yards of the house but no closer. We worked so hard to train the dog to not chase deer that she thinks they're part of the family. We looked out one morning and a deer was bedded down in the flower bed and the dog was asleep beside the one next to it.

    Of course in bad times we'll have human security guards out too. We have only one road into the neighborhood. Once you turn onto it it's another three miles to our place. We'll also have a neighborhood watch going in bad times.
     
  14. greaseman

    greaseman Well-Known Member

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    I think the suggested scenerio is a great way to test your ideas about what one might do when when the SHTF. I have been fortunate in life, to work as a mechanic in an industrial setting , for all my adult life. As employees, we were required to be Haz-Mat certified first responders. We had the same training as fire departments. In the last few years, as everybody got older, we migrated to Haz -Mat support personel.

    Anyway, over the years, we had to train in handling every kind of disaster imaginable. I thank my lucky stars for this training. it helps me to have an idea of what I need to do. How to analyze situations, and make the best decisions. Also, this training helps me to understand what government authorities do during certain kinds of emergencies, how they think, what they will do, and so forth.

    I think I'd probably be in the same boat as a lot of the people on this site. just trying to figure out how to protect what I already have. A lot of people's plans depend on where they live. I live in an urban area, so I would enlist the help of my neighbors who I have known for 30+ years. My newest neighbor is also a prepper, and is well armed. I know he would have my back, as I would help him. He has already told me of his stored goods, and fortunately, he is in good shape.

    There is certainly no easy, one size fits all plan. I just hope with some of the training I had over the years, that this would help me pick the best plan of action. I do believe that if workable, neighbors will be absolutely essential to any sucessfull operation, especially if I help feed them.

    I look foward to hearing other ideas. good luck.