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I sold my soul to The_Blob. He had candy...
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been inspired by some of the threads on here and have decided to try to make my own salves.

I went looking for beeswax. A craft store carries it (in the candle making supplies), but the label does not say it is "food grade", so I worry that it may have been treated and may not be pure. The local natural foods market does not carry it, and I am always hesitant to order things off of the web.

Can I use something else in place of the beeswax?
Should I just assume that the beeswax from the craft store is safe to use?
Any suggestions would be helpful.

Thank you in advance:flower:
 

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I have been inspired by some of the threads on here and have decided to try to make my own salves.

I went looking for beeswax. A craft store carries it (in the candle making supplies), but the label does not say it is "food grade", so I worry that it may have been treated and may not be pure. The local natural foods market does not carry it, and I am always hesitant to order things off of the web.

Can I use something else in place of the beeswax?
Should I just assume that the beeswax from the craft store is safe to use?
Any suggestions would be helpful.

Thank you in advance:flower:
Find a local beekeeper, he will have honey, pollen and honeycomb for sale and I will bet it is 'food grade'.
 

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Many stores will sometimes carry the fancy bottled honey with the big chunk of comb in it.(mom just brought me one from Florida) Supposedly eating the comb has many health benefits and is supposed to have vitamins in it.
But I have bought whole comb honey before and just lightly heated it to get the wax out and after you let the pot cool the wax makes a hard layer on top of the honey. Plus the advantage of melting your own is that there will be honey in the wax and that is a great healer on it's own.
sure you don't get too much but most of my salve recipes only call for about 1 oz at a time.
Most bee keepers get more money for the wax than they do for the honey!:eek::D
 

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You might check out this article on how to make herbal preparations like infusions, decoctions, tinctures, and ointments: Six Common Herbal Preparations

I don't know nuthin' about herbs. But, from the article, it looks like there are various oils that you can use.
 

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I sold my soul to The_Blob. He had candy...
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Many stores will sometimes carry the fancy bottled honey with the big chunk of comb in it.(mom just brought me one from Florida) Supposedly eating the comb has many health benefits and is supposed to have vitamins in it.
But I have bought whole comb honey before and just lightly heated it to get the wax out and after you let the pot cool the wax makes a hard layer on top of the honey. Plus the advantage of melting your own is that there will be honey in the wax and that is a great healer on it's own.
sure you don't get too much but most of my salve recipes only call for about 1 oz at a time.
Most bee keepers get more money for the wax than they do for the honey!:eek::D
Okay, my sister brought me some West Virginia wildflower honey with the comb in it. :flower::flower:

Now, do I just pull the comb out, let the excess honey drip off and put the comb in a pan and heat? Will the whole comb melt away? Is the comb all wax? Sorry, I know nothing about bees or beeswax!:scratch

The craft store wants $17.99 for a block of beeswax. Aside from not knowing whether it has been "treated" with anything, I hate to buy a block for only 1-2 oz that I need. If my salve works well, then I do not mind spending money on it. But just to try it out I do not want to "waste" the money in case it doesn't work out.

I did not find any Apiaries that were open to the public in my area. I will check with some of the local farm stands, pick your own places and see if they know of any.

Any thoughts on using Soy Wax in place of the beeswax?:confused:

Thank you for the link GatorDude!
 

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Meoww
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What kind of salve are you making? I have some recipes that you dont need bees wax. If you like I can post some.
 

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Reverend Coot
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Try yer local hardware store, plumbin ilse, used ta have bee's wax in little pucks.
 

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I have been inspired by some of the threads on here and have decided to try to make my own salves.

I went looking for beeswax. A craft store carries it (in the candle making supplies), but the label does not say it is "food grade", so I worry that it may have been treated and may not be pure. The local natural foods market does not carry it, and I am always hesitant to order things off of the web.

Can I use something else in place of the beeswax?
Should I just assume that the beeswax from the craft store is safe to use?
Any suggestions would be helpful.

Thank you in advance:flower:
you can buy it on ebay, all bees wax is food grade til humans doctor it up. yes the wax in the craft store is safe
 

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I sold my soul to The_Blob. He had candy...
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
CatsRaven, I thought I would start small and simple with a peppermint salve. Since I am very new to medicinal herbs I figured that was my safest bet. But please post your recipes. If I manage to not screw this one up too badly:D, I will want to try more. Specifically some topical antibiotic/antimicrobial, burns, chapped/dry skin and muscle rub types.

OldCootAppalachian-American (I just could not stop myself:kiss:), I can't believe you said that. As soon as I read it, I realized that somewhere in my craft stuff, I do have a "puck" of beeswax. I use it for making Romanian Easter eggs. Thank you!!! Now I have to find the box of dyes and stuff. (My mind kept thinking block not puck, sometimes I just over think things:scratch).

LotsOfLead, yeah, the whole doctoring of the wax is what scares me! I would hate to use something in a lip balm and poison the whole family.:eek:
 

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Reverend Coot
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Long as ya don't call me late ta supper!:D
 

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Partyin' like it's 1699
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Unless you're buying a whole BOX of beeswax, 17.99 sounds quite expensive to me. I make my own herbal salve. I'll give you the recipe right here, along with a link to where I buy my beeswax from. They are in my state, and their beeswax is most definitely pure-has that sweet honey smell someone else mentioned.

Homemade soap & other natural products from Honey Hill Farm

Keep in mind that one or two pounds of beeswax goes a LONG way. I bought my beeswax two years ago and still have plenty left. As long as you keep it in a cool place it lasts forever.

My Summer 2010 salve recipe:

1 large bunch of comfrey leaves
2 cups of fresh broadleaf plantain leaves
1/2 cup yarrow, leaves and flowers
1/4 cup fresh lemon balm
approx 3 cups grated beeswax
corn oil
olive oil
tea tree oil
lavender oil

Place fresh herbs in a saucepan and pour enough corn oil (or safflower or whatever you're using) to cover the herbs. Simmer for about 1 hour until the plants look dried up but not burned. Strain the liquid into another saucepan through a colander lined with cheesecloth or paper towels. let the dark green juices from the plant drip out, and once its cool enough give it a good squeeze to make sure you got everything out-this is the good stuff!! Put the liquid back on heat, and add your beeswax until you get the desired consistency. This can be checked by dipping a spoon into the hot liquid and putting it in the freezer for a minute. If its too soft, add more wax.
Pour hot liquid into 4oz or smaller jars. I have these tiny mustard sample jars that are great for traveling, baby food jars work well too. At this time, add 1-2 drops of tea tree oil to each jar, along with lavender oil or whichever essential oil scent you like. Put the lids on and allow salve to set completely.

Tips: Grate the beeswax on a large, upright cheese grater. Make sure this grater will only be used for salve-making purposes-this is for two reasons: 1. Don't want to risk contamination from food particles left on the grater, and 2. Even if you were lucky enough to manage it, you'll NEVER get the beeswax off the grater anyhow! Do this while the herbs are simmering-it's a little time consuming.
 

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The wanderer
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catsraven, I'd love some of the recipes, too, that don't need bees wax.

I hope to get some beeswax at the end of the month. I local beekeeper always has a booth at our county fair with beeswax, as well as soaps and salves they make, plus honey for sale.

Then I can try oldfashionedmama's recipe, because I have all those herbs on hand, and it looks like a great recipe. Just need the beeswax now!

You can pick up extra graters at Dollar stores and thrift stores, cheap. Everyone probably knows that, though! lol
 

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I just took the comb out of the honey and let the extra honey drip out as much as possible and then lightly heated it in a little pot on the stove at the lowest flame I could get and I also poured the honey(once I took the harder wax off the top thru a fine mesh to catch any bits left in there.. I prefer not to heat honey but with the whole comb I just couldn't figure out any other way. I did use the honey from the comb melting for cooking in my breads anyway.
Usually when you buy honey comb they get as much "extra" bits and pieces out of it/off it. Can you see someone buying a comb with a bee stuck in it? lol Lots of complaining to the store for sure!:D

ETA:I just took a peek at the jar that my mom got me in Florida and some of the caps are cut open so when I melt this one down I am gonna put it over a bowl in one of my sieves and get as much out as possible before melting it down. It smells soooo good!
 

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I just took the comb out of the honey and let the extra honey drip out as much as possible and then lightly heated it in a little pot on the stove at the lowest flame I could get and I also poured the honey(once I took the harder wax off the top thru a fine mesh to catch any bits left in there.. I prefer not to heat honey but with the whole comb I just couldn't figure out any other way. I did use the honey from the comb melting for cooking in my breads anyway.
Usually when you buy honey comb they get as much "extra" bits and pieces out of it/off it. Can you see someone buying a comb with a bee stuck in it? lol Lots of complaining to the store for sure!:D

ETA:I just took a peek at the jar that my mom got me in Florida and some of the caps are cut open so when I melt this one down I am gonna put it over a bowl in one of my sieves and get as much out as possible before melting it down. It smells soooo good!
you can use the crush and strain method to get the honey out of wax, just put the combs in a pan and crush then and dump everything in a strainer over night
 

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Meoww
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Ok alternatives to bees wax

Lard or tallow,solidified Cottonseed oil, Petroleum Jelly, carnauba wax.

You can also use Bag Balm. I like to use essential oils to make salves. My favorites are Chamomile, Neem, Jojba, Hempseed Oil, Evening Primrose Oil, Karanja Oil.
If you have a skin problem like really dry skin use Neem oil. You can use it in your hair and on your skin. It is really good for scrapes, cuts, burns. Put some in your salve, shampoo, soap, lotion. It stinks but you can use some essential oil to mask the smell. Its also good as a bug replant so is Karanja Oil. Mix them together no bug will even think about getting close to you.

To infuse an oil you have to let in steep for at least 2 weeks more is better.

1 c. oil
stuff it full of the herb or herbs you want to use. Put in as much as the oil will take. Heat it to about 100 and put it into a jar put a lid on and put it in a warm place. On top of the fringe is good. Keep it out of the sun.

Ill get into recipes later.
 

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Meoww
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Sorry this took so long Im having problems with my monitor.


For itching

1 c. vegetable shortening
½ c. Juniper berries
1/4 c. Burdock root sliced into small pieces
1/4 c. Chickweed

Soak Juniper berries over night. Drain them next morning or when ever you decide to start. Melt vegetable shortening on low. Put in the Juniper berries, Burdock root and Chickweed. Simmer for 2 to 3 hours. Cool and Pour into glass jar put top on jar and put it in a warm place for 2weeks. Melt again and strain out herbs with cheese cloth. Squeeze cheese cloth to get all of the liquid. Bottle mark and date. Keep it in the fridge. You can keep it at room temp for 3 months.


Healing

1/4 c. Goldenseal
1/4 c. Chickweed
1/4 c. Chamomile Flowers
1/4 c. Yarrow
Enough melted vegetable shortening to cover. Put in glass jar put on lid. Put it in a warm place for 4 weeks. You can also use Vaseline if you like. I don’t like to use it but if you like it.

By the way you can use vegetable oil and bees wax in all of these if you have them. ;)
 

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I sold my soul to The_Blob. He had candy...
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I did not find any Apiaries that were open to the public in my area. I will check with some of the local farm stands, pick your own places and see if they know of any.
I was at work today and one of my customers was wearing a hat for an Apiary, so I asked him about it. It turns out that he is the owner! He gave me a business card and invited me up. I will be going after Christmas. He sells the wax and raw honey (and other bee related stuff). I am so excited!!!:flower:
 
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