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The wanderer
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4,350 Posts
Seagulls! Lots of seagulls! Just ask anyone who lives in (or has lived in) Salt Lake City! :D
 

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performing monkey
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4,230 Posts
and now for the "yuck" factor... ;)

I'll admit it, I've eaten bugs. Insects often contain more protein, and (good) fat than equal amounts of beef or fish, and a higher energy value than soybeans, maize, lentils, or other beans by weight. According to a United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) report, caterpillars of many species are rich in potassium, calcium, magnesium, zinc, and iron, as well as B-vitamins. In some African regions, children fight malnutrition by eating flour made out of dried caterpillars. There are many reasons to explore insects as a food source, including their impressive nutritive value, easy breeding in captivity, low maintenance, and high biomass. We could enrich many low quality consumer foods with insect flour in order to make them more nutritious. I think that finding an economic and nutritional use for insect species provides an important means to avoid starvation and poverty. The Chinese spend over $200 million annually on edible ants alone.
 

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Seeking The Truth
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7,938 Posts
and now for the "yuck" factor... ;)

I'll admit it, I've eaten bugs. Insects often contain more protein, and (good) fat than equal amounts of beef or fish, and a higher energy value than soybeans, maize, lentils, or other beans by weight. According to a United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) report, caterpillars of many species are rich in potassium, calcium, magnesium, zinc, and iron, as well as B-vitamins. In some African regions, children fight malnutrition by eating flour made out of dried caterpillars. There are many reasons to explore insects as a food source, including their impressive nutritive value, easy breeding in captivity, low maintenance, and high biomass. We could enrich many low quality consumer foods with insect flour in order to make them more nutritious. I think that finding an economic and nutritional use for insect species provides an important means to avoid starvation and poverty. The Chinese spend over $200 million annually on edible ants alone.
John The Baptist ate locusts,so did some Old Testement folk.

Locust have always been a problem on and off.
 
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