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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Several posts through out this site mention rope. Have you checked its condition is it still in good shape or will it fail you? I spent the Memorial Day Weekend on our sailboat and decided 30% of my sheets, lines and halyards (sailboats don't have rope) need replacing. It will be costly, but neccessary. The sun is hard on them. I recomend you check you ropes.
 

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performing monkey
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have you found any uses for the old sheets, like for car covers or tarps?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
have you found any uses for the old sheets, like for car covers or tarps?
Blob, I have a few old lines, mostly jib and main sheets, to answer your question I use them for tieing tarps down, securing loads. Emergency lines. I tie one to an anchor ball when we are on the hook, I use that line to pull the anchor up, it's easier than the anchor line. These lines seem to accumulate over time. They are substandard for primary lines, but still can be used as an emergency back up.
 

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All my climbing gear that's made of slings, cord, or rope gets replaced every few years regardless of if it has been used or not. All the synthetic materials degrade over time. I'd still use the old rope for tasks where there is no treat of loss of life or property. Still climbing is the only thing I use rope for. All the manufacturers give timelines on when they should be disposed of. I also check it before every trip inch by inch to make sure the core is not exposed and the sheath is not pulling off.
 

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YourAdministrator, eh?
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It depends on the kind of rope ... tie a tarp-down on a trailer rope - naa .. as long as it doesn't look like it is 1/2 worn through. I don't do rope-climbing - just extreme hiking. The ropes I carry for a hike would be sufficient for making a temporary shelter if the need arises, or for helping to build a splint in case of accident ...

Tow-ropes (for off-roading) are inspected regularly for significant wear and replaced as required. I wear out a tow-rope every two or three years .. not super expensive to replace ($50 or so) - I just chalk it up to maintenance of my vehicle (similar to oil-changes and such).
 

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I found some of the synthetic ropes (almost plastic) are very hard on your hands and they will take a set if tied for a while. Rather stick with cotton or good nylon ropes for sure good service
 

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Several posts through out this site mention rope. Have you checked its condition is it still in good shape or will it fail you? I spent the Memorial Day Weekend on our sailboat and decided 30% of my sheets, lines and halyards (sailboats don't have rope) need replacing. It will be costly, but neccessary. The sun is hard on them. I recomend you check you ropes.
Now I KNOW you are a for-real sailor ---you are right, sailboats have LINES not rope!

One also needs to adapt their rope to their climate - in my colder area, nylon gets mighty brittle in the cold and will snap when you put a load on it! I always look for natural fibers although they weaken with time and need to be checked. I do it every spring and autumn as part of my taking care of the yard schedule.
 
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