Rolling Blackouts in Texas

Discussion in 'International Current News & Events' started by nkjones1, Feb 7, 2011.

  1. nkjones1

    nkjones1 Active Member

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    I don't know if any of you have seen this if you're not from Texas, but we here in the Lone Star State can no longer produce enough electricity to power our state when our heaters all kick on. From what I understand this is largely due to the president's EPA policy towards coal-burning power plants. Lots of them have been shut down. Others that were planning on building new power plants decided against it because they wouldn't be able to make a profit with the EPA cap-and-trade program. Also they did set something up so that in cases like this we would import electricity from Mexico...yep Mexico, a foreign country.

    » Rolling Blackouts Fraud: ERCOT Admits Overcapacity Alex Jones' Infowars: There's a war on for your mind!

    » Obama Agenda To Bankrupt Power Plants Triggers Blackouts Alex Jones' Infowars: There's a war on for your mind!
     
  2. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    Canada ships alot of electricity to the USA. In fact, my dad had the key (retired now) that would / could shut-down all of California. Alberta ships alot of power to Montana and Quebec / Ontario feeds the east-coast. I heard one time that 75% of California's power is produced outside of its borders - outside of its direct control.

    The same with large portions of the east-coast where the power generated by nuclear-power isn't enough to keep all the homes / businesses powered up, so, power is transmitted from Ontario and Quebec along the grid to keep those areas powered up.

    You might be surprised at how much power is created in Texas vs how much power is consumed daily. The grid supplies the extra that is needed ...
     

  3. nkjones1

    nkjones1 Active Member

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    I didn't know that we imported electricity at all honestly. I certainly didn't mean anything against Canada sir. In fact I wouldn't mind living there. I was just a little pissed when, after putting up with a day and a half where the power would be on for an hour and then off for the next hour, that to solve the problem we were going to import electricity from Mexico. Particularly Mexico with the drug war and the border problem and all.

    Some fascinating stuff. You or at least I would think that each country and at least down to the state if not county should be able to produce enough electricity for it's constituents. Why am I not surprised?
     
  4. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    If you asked the right questions to your electricity provider, you might be able to find out how much power that they produce themselves vs how much power they bring in from out-of-state. The power you are using could be transmitted via the grid from as far away as the Hoover Dam quite easily.

    With the rolling blackouts happening, right now would be a perfect time for you to start creating your own electricity and selling the excess back to the grid through a grid tied system.
     
  5. nkjones1

    nkjones1 Active Member

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    Yeah, I've been looking into that, it's pretty pricey though. My father-in-law just had that done I think he said it cost like $24k. I'm sure it's well-worth the investment, just don't have the cash. I am going to try and get at least a solar back-up generator, and just today I started building a solar-powered water distiller that's looking promising
     
  6. SaskDame

    SaskDame Well-Known Member

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    I took a serious look at the grid tied systems a year or two ago, and in many jursidictions it is investment cost prohibative. In this jurisdiction, the cost effective investment would be well beyond a million and the break even time would be measured in decades.
     
  7. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    Sask,

    Enmax here in Calgary is providing grid-tie systems to home-owners in the Calgary area. Enmax is really trying to push micro-gen power creation where home-owners / business-owners can hook-up solar and wind-generators to their buildings and put power into the grid. The "testing phase" is now complete and the roll-out is beginning.
     
  8. JayJay

    JayJay Well-Known Member

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    Some fascinating stuff. You or at least I would think that each country and at least down to the state if not county should be able to produce enough electricity for it's constituents. Why am I not surprised?
    __________________


    Could it be our nation is too busy investing our tax dollars producing electricity in Afghanistan and Iraq....you know, the countries we tore down so Haliburton could re-build??:nuts: