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Texan
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Discussion Starter #1
Most of us have food stores of one kind or another however, I have seen questions posted as to how to use the stored items. I have visited other sites and seen elaborate recipes that would more likely be seen on a Fine Dining Restaurant Menu than a "Prepper" site. If you store all those food items/ingredients, like one of the people on the Nat Geo Prepper Shows does, more power to you but most of us dont.

What I would like to see are some good, appetizing and basic dishes that would likely be on your menus when "TSHTF". Dishes that include staples like potatoes canned and dehydrated, Dried meats and fish made into good main dishes, vegetable dishes and good basic breads, to include cornbreads, biscuits, spoon breads as well as yeast breads.

We cant forget desserts and comfort foods. Those things that would take you out of the area of just surviving and into the realm of "Living".

It is going to be hard for me to come up with these as I very seldom measure in my cooking, this frustrates many people I try to explain dishes to, especially my daughters.

I know recipes pop up here and there but I haven't seen them presented in one spot, preferably in the same thread where someone on this site could possibly put together a Cook Book. That would be a big Plus for all of us who store basic ingredients and dont have big stockpiles of commercially prepared freeze dried and dehydraed foods.

I will start it off with the Banana Bread recipe I posted a while back.


Banana Nut Bread

Wets
2 Cups Sugar
1 ½ Cups Oil
3 Large Eggs
2 Tblspns Vanilla

Drys
3 Cups All Purpose Flour
1 Tblspn Baking Soda
1 Tblspn Salt
½ Cup Chopped Nuts

2 Cups Mashed Ripe Bananas

Mix wets and dries separately then mix together. When mixed, add Bananas and Nuts.

Bake in greased/floured bunt pan at 325 for 1 hour 20 minutes.

Bake in mini-loaf pans(5 23/32 x3 5/16 x 1 7/8) at 325 for 1 hour
(1 recipe makes 5 mini-loaf pans)

Bake in regular loaf pan at 325 for 1hour and 20 minutes.


Rehydrate Bananas
Place 2 cups dried banana slices in a bowl large enough to hold them and water enough to completely cover them to 1 inch above slices. Cover with boiling water and let stand unil all the slices are tender.

The bananas will turn dark just like over ripe bananas. Pour off the water and set aside. Mash the bananas or use a stick blender to puree them and they are ready to add to the other ingredients.


Eggs
Place 3 rounded tablespoons of fine egg powder, or 4 rounded tablespoons of course powder into a tall drinking glass type container. Add 10 to 13 1/2 tablespoons warm water to the glass and set aside to soak for about 5-10 minutes.

When all the egg solids are soft, mix with a stick blender until smooth. If the mixture seems thicker than it should be add water until it is the same consistancy of fresh eggs. The eggs are ready to add to the ingredients.
 

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recipes using only very basic storage foods

As soon as I started putting food in storage in earnest I started searching for recipes to use them. Here are some ideas for using the very limited foods in a rock-bottom basic storage plan. If they seem a bit austere, they are; but remember, they are to keep you from starving. You will add to your storage as finances allow to expand your food horizons.

BASIC BREAKFASTS

OATMEAL (for one)
1/3 cup oatmeal
1 cup water
salt to taste
Combine, and bring to a boil. Stir, cover and remove from heat to thicken to taste.
The time boiling depends on the cut of the oatmeal (check your package).

CRUNCHY OATS (A very bare-bones recipe for those who prefer cold cereal.)
1 1/2 c quick oats
1/4 c oil or melted fat
1/4 c sugar (packed brown tastes better if you happened to store some)
1/4 cup water
1/8 tsp salt
Mix fat, water, sugar and salt, heating to melt in fat if needed. Mix in oatmeal and spread on a well greased cookie sheet. Bake at 300 degrees for 30 min. stirring every 10 min to toast lightly. Cool. If you scrounge up or have any extras stored (raisins keep 10 years), add after cooling.

CORNMEAL MUSH (This is amazingly tasty for something with such a plain name.)
3 cups water
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cups cornmeal (ground dent corn)
1 more cup cold water
Mix meal and 1 cup of cold water. Bring remaining 3 cups water and salt to a boil. Gradually mix meal and water mixture into the boiling water, stirring constantly. Boil until thick. Cover, lower heat, and cook 10 min or more. Serve as a cereal, or pour into a loaf pan and chill for slices, or pour into cupcake tins for little cakes. Chill.
When the chilled mush is firm, turn out of the pan, slice 1/4 inch thick, roll in some flour, then pan fry in hot fat.

BROWNED SUGAR SYRUP
1 cup sugar, divided
1/2 cup water
dash of salt
1 teaspoon shortening
4 teaspoons white flour
1/2 cup hot water
Measure 1/4 cup sugar, salt and flour into a small bowl. Stir in 1/2 cup water until lump-free. Drop in shortening and set aside. Sprinkle 3/4 cup sugar evenly in bottom of a silver pan (so you can see it change color). Heat it slowly over med-high heat. As sugar melts, gently push dry sugar to center of syrup. When syrup is apple juice-colored (about
338°F) or almost as dark as you like, remove pan from heat. Sugar does not need to completely dissolve. With lid in one hand and pre-measured 1/2 cup hot water in the other, quickly pour hot water over syrup and cover pan with lid. BE CAREFUL...it will sputter and steam. Tilt pan back and forth a few times and return to heat. Uncover when pan has quit steaming. When sugar is liquefied, stir in mixture in bowl and cook until syrup is thickened. It will thicken more as it cools. Makes about 1 cup. Will store in refrigerator 3 months if it lasts that long.
Note: Caramelization determines flavor and color. Darker color = stronger burnt flavor. To stretch the sugar, a smaller amount can be used (may need to increase flour) with a decrease in flavor occurring.

BOILED WHEAT (for breakfast, or as side dish)
1 cup wheat kernels ("berries")
4 cups water
1 tsp salt
Combine wheat and water in a heavy pot. Bring to a boil and cook 2 minutes. Remove from heat, cover, and let stand 1 hour. Return to heat and simmer for 1 hour longer until cooked soft. Eat plain, or with reconstituted milk, sugar, or melted fat.

POPPED WHEAT
Soak wheat berries overnight in water, and then spread out on clean paper to dry.
Heat a little oil or melted fat in a skillet, and fry the dry wheat until it swells up and pops a little (it won't pop like corn, but you will notice). Scoop out with a strainer (a spoon will work but it is more work) and drain on clean paper. Season with salt.

ALL NIGHT WHEAT (easy to make in the slow coals of a campfire overnight)
2 cups wheat
1/2 - 1 tsp salt
6 cups water. Combine wheat and water. Bake all night in 150-200 degree oven, in a slow cooker, or in a sturdy pot or Dutch oven buried in coals of the campfire.

CORNMEAL GRIDDLE CAKES
1 1/2 cups cornmeal
1/4 c reconstituted milk
1/4 cup sugar
1 1/2 c boiling water
1 TB melted fat
1/2 tsp salt
Mix sugar, salt, cornmeal and stir well. Stir in milk, melted butter and boiling water. Beat very well until it swells and the cornmeal softens. Cook on a greased griddle.

VERY BASIC BREADS

MINIMALIST HOECAKES
2 c cornmeal or ground corn
2 c boiling water
1 tsp salt
some kind of fat or oil
Mix meal and salt; pour boiling water over it and stir until well mixed and it swells up. Let cool until you can handle it. Shape into cakes 1/2 inch thick and about 3 inches across. Bake on an ungreased griddle, or melt some fat into a skillet and fry. Serve hot and crisp.

BASIC CORN TORTILLAS
1 c cornmeal
1 1/2 cups water
3 TB fat/shortening/oil
1 1/4 c flour
1 tsp salt
Bring water to a boil. Add half the fat to melt in, and then quickly stir in cornmeal. Lower heat, cover and cook on very low heat 1 minutes. Stir in remaining margarine, remove heat, and set aside to cool.
Mix flour and salt, and stir into cooled cornmeal mush. Knead to firm it up. Divide into 12 pieces. Roll out using more cornmeal to prevent sticking. Cook in an ungreased skillet 1 1/2 minutes per side.

CORN TORTILLAS, CHIPS OR TACO SHELLS (add beans for a meal)
1 c cornmeal
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 to 3/4 cup water
Combine meal, salt and water to make soft dough. If too dry, add water. Cover with a cloth, let stand 30 min for the meal to absorb the water and soften. Shape into 7 two inch balls, then press or roll into 6 inch circles.
For Tortillas: fry on hot griddle 1 minute or until edges start to curl. Flip and cook the other side one minute.
For Chips: Cut rolled rounds into small pieces and deep fry 20 seconds in hot oil. Remove with slotted spoon, drain on paper towels, and sprinkle with salt while hot.
For Taco Shells: Heat 1/3 inch fat in skillet to 350 degrees. Slip uncooked tortilla into hot oil, and after 1 second, use a spatula and gold it in half. Insert the spatula into the fold and press down to fry for 30-60 seconds until golden. Turn over and repeat. Remove, drain curled side down so fat will drain off. Fill with refried beans or other food as available.

FLOUR TORTILLAS
3 c flour
1 tsp salt
1/4 c oil or melted fat
1/2 c lukewarm water
Combine flour and salt and cut in fat until very fine. Add water gradually, tossing with fork to make a stiff dough. Knead until smooth and flecked with air bubbles. Grease surface, cover tightly and chill four to fourteen hours until ready to make up. Divide into 8 to 12 balls, and roll each as thin as possible. Cook on ungreased griddle or skillet for 30 seconds until freckled underneath. Turn and cook other side. Use hot, chill, or freeze. Heat briefly to make flexible before using.

CORN HUSK ROLLS
2 cups corn meal, white, yellow or mixed
1 cup boiling water
1/2 cup melted fat
green corn husks
Mix cornmeal with salt to taste, and bring water to a boil. Melt fat into the water, and stir hot liquid into cornmeal. Stir constantly until cornmeal swells up. Shape into little 'fingers' or 'torpedoes' of mush and wrap each roll in a green cornhusk like wrapping a burrito. Place rolled up husks in 8x13 inch pan and bake at 350 for 1 hour. They may also be steamed in a rack over boiling water, or baked in ashes, depending on your circumstances.

CRAP-SHOOT WILD YEAST
(Sometimes it works, sometimes not, but here is how it is done if you want to try catching wild yeast for sourdough breads)
2 cups flour
2 cups warm water
2 tsp honey or sugar
Mix well, place in an uncovered bottle or crock (no metal). Let ferment 5 days in a warm place. Stir several times a day to aerate. It will smell yeasty and small bubbles will begin to come to the top. Then you know it is ready to use.
On day 5, feed the starter using equal amounts of flour and water. In another 14 yours, the yeast will foam and work and be ready to use for baking bread.
Be sure to save some, storing in a cool place (refrigerator) in glass or crockery container with a tight lid. Shake often. To activate before using, add 2-3 TB each flour and water and stir.

SOURDOUGH BREAD USING WILD YEAST (Makes 3 loaves)
1 c starter or wild yeast
2 cups warm water
3 1/2 cups flour
2 tsp salt
2 TB dry milk powder
1 TB honey of sugar
Combine all ingredients, mixing well. Turn out on a floured board on a pile of more flour and knead in just enough to keep the dough from sticking. Knead well, for 10 minutes (don't cheat, use the clock or a timer). When dough is smooth and satiny (should feel like a baby's butt) place in a warm bowl and cover with a damp, hot clean cloth. Let rise about 5 hours at room temperature (wild yeast is slow) or until doubled. Punch down, shape in 3 loaves and let rise again about 3 hours more. Bake at 325 for about 1 hour in a greased or well floured pan or in juice cans. (Or you can put on a flat sheet, but space them out so they don't spread too much.)

SAUCES

BASIC BROWNED FLOUR GRAVY
1/4 c melted fat/shortening
1 cup flour or cornmeal
3 cups water, reconstituted milk, or a mixture
Melt the fat in a skillet. Let it get 'real hot' and add the meal or flour, stirring constantly. You want it to brown, not burn, so keep stirring and watch close. When it is browned, add liquid gradually, stirring all the while. Cook while stirring until it thickens.
(An old name for cornmeal gravy was 'sawmill gravy' probably due to its rougher texture.)

WHITE SAUCE
1/4 cup flour
1/4 cup melted fat
1 cup reconstituted milk
salt to taste
Melt fat in a skillet; blend in flour gradually to make a non-lumpy paste. Gradually whisk milk into the paste, a whisk helps avoid lumps. Heat and stir over medium heat until it thickens, then cook and stir 2 min to cook the flour. This is a traditional white sauce, and the fat calories are welcome in short rations for nutrient absorption and satiety (stick-to-the-ribs value).

NO-FRILLS NONFAT WHITE SAUCE
1/4 cup flour
1 cup reconstituted milk
salt to taste
Shake flour in milk in a tightly closed jar until flour blends with no lumps. Pour into a saucepan. Heat over med heat, stirring often, until mixture simmers. Stirring constantly, simmer 3 minutes to cook the flour and thicken the sauce. Salt to taste. This is a very basic sauce that uses no fat.

SOUPS

BROWNED FLOUR SOUP (6 servings)
1 TB melted fat
1/2 c flour
4 cups water
1 pint milk, reconstituted from dry milk
1 tsp salt
Melt fat and blend in flour over low heat, stirring constantly until dark brown but not burned. Gradually stir in water; then when water is completely incorporated, gradually blend in milk. Salt to taste. This also will work using cornmeal. Do not leave out the browning of the flour - it adds tremendously to the satisfying flavor of the soup!

BEAN CHOWDER (4 CUPS)
1/4 cup soaked beans (any kind)
4 TB flour
salt to taste
2 TB melted fat (any good tasting fat will do)
water
Soak beans overnight.
The next day, simmer beans until tender in fresh water to cover. Drain, but save water.
Measure drained water, adding more if needed to make 4 cups. In a skillet, melt the fat or shortening, and sprinkle in flour. Brown flour, stirring constantly to keep it from burning. You want to richly brown it, but not burn it. Blend in cooking water (a whisk helps) and heat through. It should thicken the water a little. Stir in beans just before serving. If it gets too thick, thin with water. The browning of the flour enhances flavor and the thickness of the soup adds to its satisfaction levels. (in Nov 2011 cost was 25 cents for the entire recipe).

CREAMY WHITE BEAN SOUP (4 cups)
1/4 cup soaked beans (navy, great northern, lima, or other white ones)
4 TB flour
5 TB instant nonfat dry milk
salt to taste
2 TB melted fat
water to cover beans
Soak beans overnight in water to cover. The next day, simmer beans until tender in fresh water to cover. Drain, but save water.
Measure drained water, adding more if needed to make 4 cups. Mix the dry milk into the drained water, shaking in a jar or stirring to avoid lumps. In a skillet, melt the fat or shortening, and sprinkle in flour. Mix into a paste, then blend in reconstituted milk made from the cooking water (a whisk helps) and heat through. It should thicken a little. Cook and stir 2 minutes, then stir in beans just before serving. If it gets too thick, thin with water. If too thin, mash up to half the beans to thicken it up.
Thick soups are more satisfying than thin ones when using soup as a main part of the meal.

ADJUSTABLE BEAN SOUP (8 svg)
1 lb beans
2 TB good tasting fat
salt and pepper
Soak beans overnight in 2 qts water. In morning, pour off water, put on fresh water and cook beans in fresh water with the onion and beef fat until very soft. Mash or put through colander to remove skins and make smooth. Add water to make about 2 qts rather thick soup. Season to taste. (cost to make in Nov 2011 was $1.36 for the entire recipe)
VARIATIONS
1. Make with cold baked beans; boil 30 min until they fall apart, then strain & season. (good use of any leftover beans)
2. Use split or dried peas, or lentils instead of beans. (same cost)

MAIN DISHES

RICE - You don't need minute rice, which is pre-cooked and re-dried when plain rice stores so much more compactly and is much cheaper.

BOILED RICE
1 cup rice
2 cups water
1 TB fat
1 tsp salt
Combine in heavy pot and bring to a brisk boil. Cover, lower heat to very low. Simmer 15-18 min or until water absorbs. For extra fluffy rice, set pan aside, covered 5-10 min before serving. This makes about 3 cups rice. Make extra for other uses.

STUFFED BURRITO
A little cooked white rice can be added to other burrito ingredients (beans, mashed beans, sauce, etc) to make a nice, fat, satisfying burrito.

RICE FLOUR (GLUTEN FREE)
Grind uncooked rice to a fine powder. Use instead of flour for thickening. Works especially well for sauces.

RICE AND BEANS
The meal of choice for balanced nutrition and energy. Any ration can be used, but most folks use half and half. Salt to taste. When you start adding things to basic storage, a little onion powder enhances the flavor.

PLAIN FRIED RICE
Make up extra rice the day before making this, it uses cold leftover rice.
1/2 c cooked rice per person
2 TB melted fat
Salt to taste
Simply fry the rice in melted fat. Stir-fry until browned. Salt to taste.

SWEET FRIED RICE
Add 1 TB sugar to the above. Good as a dessert or breakfast treat.

LENTILS AND RICE (makes 4 cups)
1 cup uncooked rice
1/3 c uncooked lentils
1 TB fat
4 cups water
Combine in heavy pot and bring to a brisk boil. Stir, lower heat and cover. Simmer 15-20 minutes until water is absorbed and lentils are tender. Salt to taste, stir in extra melted fat if you have any and serve. A good complementary protein dish with a meatier taste.
Also good to stuff burritos.

SWEET BEANS (4 to 6 servings)
1 lb beans
water to cover
1/2 to 1 cups sugar (to taste) or homemade syrup
Presoak beans overnight. Drain, replace water. Bring to a boil, then lower heat and simmer 1 hour or until skins peel back when you blow on a spoonful. Drain beans again, saving the cooking water. Return beans to the pot. Dissolve the sugar in a little hot water, and add to the pot. Stir to distribute sweetening evenly. Add enough of the hot cooking water to just make the beans 'juicy'. Return pot to a boil over med heat, then lower heat and simmer until done. Salt to taste when finished cooking. A little sweetening perks up a pot of plain beans.

BEAN SANDWICHES
Mash beans or use a blender to mash them faster. Blend in a little milk to thin them and salt to taste. Make the texture like peanut butter and spread on toasted bread.
Open face or closed face both work well. You can grill them as well.

REFRIED BEANS
3 cups cold cooked beans or 2 cans, drained
4 TB melted fat, oil or shortening
Warm beans in hot fat in a skillet. As they heat, mash the beans and mix with the fat . Mash smooth or leave a little texture as you desire. Salt to taste. Keep heating and mixing until the beans and oil are mixed and look rather dry. These will thicken as they cool, so if you reheat them, add a little water. Use to mix with leftover rice and stuff burritos.

SPROUTING BEANS
Swish beans in a pan of warm water, discarding floaters.
Soak in lukewarm water 18-24 hours, changing water if is sours. Soak soys only 4 hours.
Drain. Place in colander lined with double cheesecloth. Weight the cloth to hold the beans down. Keep beans at room temperature, rinsing 3 times a day by running water through colander, disturbing the beans as little as possible.
In 4-7 days beans should be 4 inches long. Rinse in cold water and store in damp paper towels in the refrigerator crisper tray. Soy sprouts must be cooked before eating. Either parboil or steam 20 min. Others can be eaten raw or cooked.
Some ways to use sprouts:
sauté in fat as a vegetable
eat raw as a salad
chop and add to coleslaw
add to fried rice or other stir-fried foods

3-WAY PASTA
1. Boil pasta as per package directions and drain. Return to cook pot, add a dollop (a big one) of fat or a shot of oil. Depending on the fat or oil you have stored the flavor will vary. The pasta will not stick together, and if you stored some good tasting fat will taste good as-is. Salt to taste.
2. Cooked beans add texture and complete the pasta protein. Toss some with the pasta and oil. You can also mash the beans with some flour and form into meatballs. Salt to taste.
3. Make gravy using reconstituted milk (recipe above) and add to pasta for a béchamel style sauce. Top with brown fried bread crumbs if you can spare a slice of your sourdough bread.

If these recipes seem austere, it is because they are. They use only the rock bottom basic storage foods, and show you how it is possible to eat them. Meals won't be very interesting, but you need not starve either. As you expand your storage, you will be adding the seasonings and other foods that vary these and make them special.
 

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BORN PESSIMIST; we are doomed
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These are the kinds of recipes we need...only 4-5 (easily stored) ingredients, especially those that can be cooked over a fire. Thanks, kappydell & Davarm!
 

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Texan
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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you, kappydell, I had a sneaken feeling you would come through on this. These are going in my archive.

Does anyone have any favorites using dehydrated potatoes? Alot of us are drying them and it seems that few have any recipes for them.

I use them in soups and to make "Cheesey Potatoes", The next time I make them I will "MEASURE" everything and post that recipe, for those who dont know I dont measure anything so my recipes are kinda hard to pass on.
 

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Does anyone have any favorites using dehydrated potatoes? Alot of us are drying them and it seems that few have any recipes for them.

I use them in soups and to make "Cheesey Potatoes", The next time I make them I will "MEASURE" everything and post that recipe, for those who dont know I dont measure anything so my recipes are kinda hard to pass on.
Same here. I just use potato slices for au gratin style potatoes. I use boiling water, milk, a little butter, powdered cheese - maybe add a little sour cream powder or maybe add in some bacon bits - baked in the oven at 350 until the potatoes are soft and everything's bubbly. I use regular milk, but could use powdered milk. But like you, I don't have exact measurements. I really should work on that....
 

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Texan
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Discussion Starter #7
Well people, I am working on one as I type that may get the interest of some of you. Many of us have developed a taste for cheese and different cheese products, me included. I have successfully canned cheese, mostly Velveeta and I know of at least one forum member who has canned cheddar successfully.

Do any of you make cheese at home? Im pretty sure the answer to that is a yes, but how many of you have made it with Powdered Milk?

I had a wild thought tonight while I was going over some of my dehydrated recipe ideas and I thought "Why Not" try making Mozzarella from powdered milk?

Well I did it! The ball of cheese that formed was not Perfect Mozzarella, it seemed kind of dry but that was probably because I used milk with 0% milk fat. Milk that is normally used has some milk fat in it which may be why it is softer and more moist, further experiments will tell for sure.

Anyway, here is how I did it.

I used 1 25.6 ounce box of Non Fat Dry Milk mixed with 16 cups of hot water.

I put the pan with the milk in it in a larger pan filled with water(double boiler) and brought it up to about 140 degreese.

I then put in 1/4 cup of distilled white vinegar in and stired it constantly for about 5 minutes. The curds started forming immediately .

I then let the pot stand for about 15 minutes to cool down and "finish up". The Whey is a light green color.

I dipped the Curd out and into a colander lined with cheese cloth and starting "twisting" it to remove excess water.

After it cooled, I put it in a bowl of Whey to sit until I can figure out what to do with it.

My youngest daughter and I cut a piece and tasted it, her comment was her standard answer for things that I do that pleasantly surprise her "Dad, That just isnt right".

It was pretty good and was recognizable as Mozzarella. It needs some work such as salting the milk before the vinegar is added but it is a keeper.


The 1 pound 9.6 ounce box of powdered milk produced 1 pound 5 ozs of cheese.
 

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Texan
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Discussion Starter #9
Davarm, that is brilliant! I wonder if you added fat somehow if it would help? Oil, lard, I dunno?
Rachel, we can get and do have "Whole Milk Powder" here. In the "Hispanic Isle" at Wally's. I am going to try using it, maybe 50/50 in the next batch. This is only the first attempt but I am very encouraged at the results.

Tomorrow(02:45? maybe today - am staying up watching the weather) I am going to try making a pasta dish to see if it comes out like "Real" Mozzarella in a cooked dish, will let you'll know how it comes out.
 

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Like Davarm, I don't use much measurements. This is one of the first I tried using just stored. All amounts are approximate.
Chicken curry:
1/2 c dried celery
1/2 c dried onion
1 pint canned chicken
1 cup dried mixed vegetables
curry powder to taste
chicken boullion
1-2 c cooked rice
1 TBL arrowroot powder mixed n 1/4 cub water for thickening.

Reconstitute celery and onion and saute, add chicken and mixed vegetables and 1-2 cups water, chicken boullion accordingly. Cover and simmer until vegetables are tender (about 20 minutes). Add curry powder approx 1 tsp. Curry powder can also be added at the table like salt and pepper. Add cooked rice, warm, add thickener and serve.

I suppose you could add more water and put uncooked rice right in the pan and cook along with everything else giving you the ability to cook over a fire. I don't care for much curry but my husband does and adds more at the table. Curry is one of those healthy spices that would be good to help keep your health up.

Everything we made ourselves except the boullion and curry. 5#s frozen mixed veggies in the dehydrator. Onions and celery on sale and dehydrated. Home canned chicken. Rice vacumn packed in jars.

Chicken Soup:
1 Pint home canned chicken
celery
onions
garlic
mixed veggies
chicken boullion
water
spices
noodles or rice if desired or able.

My daughter came home from work one night not feeling so good and was craving chicken soup. So she tried making it from stores. She threw everything in the pot and 20 minutes later she had surprisingly good chicken soup.

For me, home canned, boullion and spices are critical additions to your stores once you have the very basics. Hunger fatigue will be a real problem among the elderly and children and my husband (lol). Also dehydrated items are going to take a lot of water. So we are learning to can 1 pot meals as much as possible that could be eaten cold if necessary.
 

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here are more recipes from my 'expanded basic storage' since my basic storage seems more austere than most.....

The expanded storage foods should primarily be those that are most versatile in meal preparation. The first additions I made to my basic food storage were the following:

DRY EGGS – a good protein source, for binding mixtures, baking, and for a major nutritional boost. I purchased dried eggs packaged in 1-dozen size mylar bags. Whole eggs are best, since that is the way most recipes use eggs. Do not be afraid to try dried eggs (I have recipes!) they are acceptable to most folks when properly prepared. I just love them scrambled with cheese!

SEASONINGS & CONDIMENTS– to vary the basic foods and ease food fatigue. Everyone has some they can’t live without. Many seasonings are available in large shaker bottles (Wal mart sells large bottles of common seasonings for $1 or less). Gourmets say you need to replace all your spices annually (wow! what an expense!) but practical experience says just add more if flavors fade. I include vinegar as a condiment because I can make my own salad dressings if I have it. I can also make pickles if I have enough, so I store several gallons. (I also store some ‘mother’ of vinegar powder so I can make more in case of long term need).

FATS: add some butter or margarine. Both can be canned or frozen. You can also purchase powdered butter or margarine to flavor up some blander fats, but why buy the flavoring when you can have the real thing? Most of my recipes use margarine – if the flavor is good I use the cheapest stuff.

PROTEIN FOODS (used in small amounts) for protein complementing and flavoring.
small 1-lb canned hams and/or spam if you like it (from sales, or discount stores)
tuna in small cans (on sale)
small cans dehydrated ground beef and/or dried chipped beef
small cans chicken
Velveeta (stores unopened for 2 – 3 years)
‘regular’ cheese (canned, frozen, or dehydrated, preferably at home)

VEGETABLES & FRUITS– for food variation, fiber and nutrition. Dehydrated or canned.
I purchase dented cans from the local canning company. They keep 3 years minimum. Dehydrated vegetables for soup are sometimes available at grocery stores, but they are not cheap, except for dehydrated potatoes. I do buy some diced tomatoes, but usually can most of mine. Tomato paste, however, is a prep food I insist upon. With it I can make tomato sauce, tomato juice, tomato soup, ketchup, salad dressings, and other goodies. The cans are small and cheap, so I always have some on hand. Tomato powder can be purchased if you prefer for very long term storage; tomato leather is easily home made.

I purchase dried mashed potato flakes, hash brown and scalloped potatoes, because it costs me as much to dehydrate them they cost on sale. (Soupy beans ladled over mashed potatoes make a satisfying meatless dinner, and ham or bacon TVP are delicious in scalloped potatoes.) Spuds are a comfort food for me and my prep partner, so we have a good supply.

TVP - a vegetarian alternative to meat. Bacon bits are always welcome at my house, but you need to taste test others, as flavors can vary widely. I also get unflavored TVP to put with rice to complement the proteins. Its bland flavor is easily covered by seasonings or sauces with the rice.

PICKLED FOODS – for their vitamin C value, and appetite stimulation. Pickles really complement the flavor of baked beans and before the use of vitamin pills were a scurvy preventative. If I did not can, I would purchase them for livening up meals.

BAKING SUPPLIES
Leavenings: You can extend yeast like sourdough, which is good, but you still should get some extra packets for fresh starts in case your sourdough quits on you. Baking powder does lose effectiveness after time, but will last about a year. Baking soda on the other hand lasts much longer (indefinitely, according to the Arm and Hammer representative on the phone). Collect recipes using soda and sour milk instead of baking power so you can switch back and forth as needed.

Cocoa powder: important for hot beverages and desserts. It is a comfort food to many.

Molasses: critical in my preps to flavor baked beans and other baked goods. A little goes a long way.
Extracts: vanilla, almond, banana, lemon and maple

COMFORT FOODS – whatever you or yours find comforting, that is cheap and shelf-stable. Hard candies store forever and the mere act of chewing gum stimulates alertness and improves brain function. Post-holiday sales are good sources of sweets and treats.

With these additional items added to your rock bottom basics you widen your recipe choices enormously. Here are some recipes and ideas to expand upon those austere basic recipes.

CORNMEAL MUSH IMPROVEMENTS:
When you make cornmeal mush, add garlic powder or onion powder to flavor it up. Chili power gives it a little kick as well. After you chill, slice and fry the mush slices, you can pour homemade syrup over it. Frying it in margarine adds a nice flavor boost, too.

OATMEAL IMPROVEMENTS
You may add some raisins, or other chopped dried fruit to the oatmeal when you start cooking it. Apple-cinnamon, raisin-cinnamon, maple and brown sugar, all pep up your basic oatmeal. Serve with cinnamon sugar, syrup or jelly thinned with a little boiling water (nice to know when the children are all clamoring for a ‘different’ flavor).

PANCAKES LIKE I-HOP (4-6 svgs, 30 cents each) These are very cheap to make and delicious to eat. Using baking powder and baking soda makes them extremely light and fluffy. Pancakes for supper are delightful, too.
1 cup all purpose flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 heaping tsp baking powder
1 tsp soda
dash of nutmeg
1 cup milk (re-constituted from dry)
1/4 c oil or melted shortening
1 egg (mix 2 TB powdered egg and 3 TB water together to make 1 egg)
Combine dry ingredients and mix well. Set aside. In large bowl, beat milk, oil and egg to blend thoroughly. Slowly whisk in dry ingredient mixture, blending well but not over beating. On ungreased skillet, heated over medium heat, pour 1/4 cup of batter for each pancake. When edge appears to harden, flip pancake (should be light brown) and cook the other side the same amount of time or until the same light brown shade.
My prep partner and I like these even without syrup – the nutmeg makes them special.

SIMPLE GRANOLA (‘crunchy oats’ really shine with added spices and fruits)
1 1/2 c quick oats
1/4 c oil
1/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 c packed brown sugar
1/4 c water
1/8 tsp salt
1/2 c raisins or other dried frit dices
Combine all ingredients, mix well. Spread on well greased cookie sheet and bake at 300 for 30 minutes. Stir every 10 min to toast lightly. Cool before adding 1/2 c raisins (optional). Dried apple dices are nice, too. Nuts are a nice addition but too pricey for me to stock in bulk. If I gather some though, I can them for adding to this recipe.

OATMEAL PILAF (like the rice side dish) is a creative way to eat fiber-rich oatmeal. It has a different texture than the usual oatmeal and tastes wonderful as a side dish or with gravy
2/3 c old fashioned oats
dash salt
1 1/2 cups water
1 egg (2 TB powder + 3 TB water)
2 TB melted fat (margarine is tasty, but any good flavored fat will work)
Scramble the egg, stir in uncooked oats and mix well. The egg will coat the oats and keep the kernels separate as it cooks. Melt fat in a skillet and stir in egg-oat mixture. Stir and sauté until egg dries up and oats look very dry. Bring water to a boil in a separate pan with the salt. When water boils, pour into hot dry oats. Stir, and heat mixture to a boil. When it boils, reduce heat to simmer for 6-10 minutes covered, until oats are cooked like rice. You may add bouillon for extra flavor.

OLD FASHIONED FRUIT CRISP (Dessert? Breakfast? Great with coffee anytime.)
4 c dried apples, peaches, or other fruit you may have dehydrated
7 1/2 c water
1/2 c sugar
2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 c melted fat
3/4 c brown sugar
1/2 c oatmeal
Bring water, apples, 1/2 c sugar, and 1 tsp cinnamon to a boil. Lower heat, simmer about 25 min covered until fruit is soft. Drain liquid except for 1 cup. Pour apples and the 1 cup liquid into a baking dish. Mix remaining ingredients and sprinkle over the fruit in the pan. Bake at 350 for 1 hour. (If you find fresh fruit, just peel, cook with a little water and sugar aand substitute for the stewed dried fruits.)

ADDITIONS TO BASIC FRIED RICE
As your food storage pantry allows you may add things to jazz up your fried rice:
Add any, all, or a combination
1. Add a beaten egg(s). Mix it with the rice before stir-frying. It will coat the rice and cook up nicely. I add one egg per 1 1/2 cups of cold rice.
2. Add chopped cooked (leftover) vegetables with the rice and stir fry; if using fresh chopped vegetables, stir fry until soft before adding the rice. This is a good use for bean sprouts, either whole for those who like them or chopped to hide them from those who don’t. It also works well if you have foraged for little bits of several different foods.
3. Add chopped cooked meats. Anything from bacon, pork, steak, poultry or seafood can be chopped or sliced paper thin and added with the rice. The false ‘krab’ legs are good here and if you want to show off, add some drained and rinsed canned shrimp!
For vegetarian fare use bacon bits or other reconstituted TVP in any flavor you enjoy.

ADDITIONS TO BEAN SOUPS
Add 1 or more as available: chopped pork, cooked crumbled bacon, a hambone, a pinch red pepper, or chopped & sauteed carrots the last 30 min. of cooking.
(Bacon bits taste good as a bacon substitute.)

ADDITIONS TO ‘SWEET BEANS’
1. Add a chopped onion to the bean pot during the 2nd simmering. It can be fresh, reconstituted or even onion powder (1/4 tsp).
2. Add meat, cut up in small dice. It can be leftover or fresh, add at the 2nd simmering. Ham or bacon are traditional, but bacon bits add the same flavor; and it is also good with hamburger, or any chopped leftover meat added. The sweet sauce pulls it all together.
3. Add ketchup to the sauce, and/or substitute part or all of the sugar or syrup with molasses, honey, or maple syrup. Salsa or barbecue sauce instead of ketchup spices things up.

HOW TO USE POWERED EGGS
1 egg equals 2 TB egg powder and 3 TB room temperature water.
Measure out amounts needed for eggs in recipe and mix with a whisk for better blending.
Let sit 30 min to absorb water well. Whisk again before using.

USING DRY EGGS IN BAKING
Mix dry egg powder with other dry ingredients. Add the water for the eggs along with the other liquid ingredients. Be sure to mix very well.

OTHER DRIED EGG USES
Use reconstituted eggs to make egg noodles, egg and cheese strata, french toast, quiche, etc. They work for making salad dressing, too.
Add 1 reconstituted egg to fried rice to enhance flavor and texture and increase protein.
Use anywhere ‘regular’ eggs would be used. Most of the time if the cook says nothing the diners do not notice (as long as the chow is good).

USING DRY MILK
Many folks do not like the taste of nonfat dry milk when it is reconstituted. Having it very cold helps. Mixing it 50-50 with fresh milk hides the ‘powdered’ taste completely for drinking fresh. You can also use reconstituted milk in any recipe for fresh fluid milk. Cooking with reconstituted milk is the most common way to ‘hide’ it. Try hot cocoa, pudding desserts or creamy soups and gravies.

YOGURT (to make your own from dry milk)
2 c instant dry milk
3 c lukewarm water
3 TB plain unflavored yogurt
Mix milk and water and stir well. Add the yogurt and mix well. Pour into a warmed glass jar, and put in a warm oven (80 degrees) and leave 2-3 hours until set. Chill at once.
You can flavor the yogurt with a little jam, some canned fruit and/or fruit syrup, or 1 tsp fruit flavored jello powder for each 3/4 cup yogurt. You can make a yogurt potato topping my mixing with onion salt and dried parsley. Mrs. Dash garlic and herb dressing is also good in yogurt to give it a ranch flavor.

VELVEETA is shelf stable for years unopened. Even opened, it will store at room temperature, well wrapped, up to eight weeks. It melts well and adds a satisfying cheesy flavor to macaroni and cheese, ham and cheese, cheesy rice, cheese soups, and hamburger casseroles.

MOLASSES BROWN SUGAR
Blend 2 TB molasses into 1/2 c sugar with a fork, mixing very well. Makes 1/3 cup of brown sugar with a slight molasses twang.

CREAM SOUPS (chicken, beef, seafood, ham, etc) makes one ‘can’
1 1/2 cups water
3 TB flour
1 c instant nonfat dry milk powder
1 1/2 tsp soup base or bouillon of choice
Shake all ingredients in a tight-lidded jar to blend completely. Pour into a pot; stir and simmer until very thick. Makes the equivalent to 1 can of cream-of-whatever soup. Use for casseroles, or add another 1 1/2 c water to make into soup to eat.

BURRITOS ANYTIME! BREAKFAST BURRITOS (makes four)
4 eggs, reconstituted from 8 TB powder + 12 TB water
4 TB minced green pepper (reconstituted from dry)
4 TB minced onions (reconstituted)
1 TB milk
1/4 tsp garlic salt
dash hot pepper sauce
4 TB salsa (canned or homemade)
4 TB shredded cheese (opt)
four 8 inch tortillas
Make tortillas ahead of time. Preheat oven to 350. In large bowl, blend eggs, milk, peppers, onions, mustard, garlic, pepper sauce and salt to taste. Blend 1 min in blender until smooth. Pour into lightly greased 9x9x2 inch pan and cover with boil. Bake 20-25 min until eggs are set. (Or you can just scramble them in a skillet). Warm tortillas to make flexible, and divide cooked egg mixture in four and put some in each tortilla. Top with some cheese shreds, and fold up. Serve topped with 1 TB salsa each. You may also add leftover cooked rice, minced leftovers, etc to the fillings and make them very fat and satisfying burritos.

REFRIED BEANS
2 cans cooked pinto beans or 3 cups cooked beans from scratch
1 tsp chili powder
1 tsp garlic powder
salt
Drain beans, mash with remaining ingredients. Heat through, adding bean liquid if you like the texture better. They thicken as they cool. Minced onions are good added in if you have any. Store in refrigerator. When reheating, add water a little a time to thin back down. Makes about 3 cups use to fill tortillas, tacos, spread on tostadas, or even on toast.

BEAN-RICE BURRITO FILLING
6 TB refried beans
3/4 cup cooked rice (leftover OK)
2 homemade tortillas
1 TB taco sauce
optional strips of lettuce if you have any
Combine beans, rice and sauce and use to fill tortillas. Put a few strips of lettuce over the filling, then fold up and serve. Makes 2 burritos.

MOCK HAMBURGER
1 c cooked wheat (cooked 1 hour)
1 can or 2 c cooked kidney beans
1 egg (reconstituted OK)
salt & pepper to taste
Cook wheat, boiling about 1 hour. Blend wheat in blender. Add beans, blend smooth
Add egg, salt and pepper and either make into patties or fry like loose hamburger. Use a well seasoned sauce with this. I use it for veggie-patties, meatless loaf or meatless balls with sauce.

MOCK HAMBURGER #2
1 cup cooked lentils
1 cup cooked whole wheat kernels
1/4 c chopped onions
Saute onions in a little oil until soft. Mix in lentils and wheat. Mix well; use in place of loose hamburger in casseroles, sloppy joes, burritos, chili, etc.

BASIC CREAMY POTATO SOUP WITH VARIATIONS (2 svgs)
1 TB minced onion (or reconstituted dry onion)
1 TB flour
1 c water
1 TB fat
1 tsp salt
3/4 c potato flakes
1 cup reconstituted nonfat dry milk
Cook onion if fat until tender and light brown. Stir in flour and salt until smooth; then slowly blend in water. Cook and stir on medium heat until slightly thick. Remove from heat. Stir in milk, then potato flakes until smooth. Heat through. Makes 2 svgs of 1 cup each.
Variations:
1) Add 4 TB shredded cheese and melt it in.
2) Add cooked chopped broccoli or other cooked vegetables (leftovers or reconstituted)
3) Use 1 tsp bouillon or soup base powder in place of the 1 tsp salt. Ham base is good with the cheese variation; seafood base is good for a mock clam chowder.

BASIC BREAD (very cheap) Using yeast. 3 loaves
2 1/2 c warm water
1 pkg yeast
2 TB sugar
2 lb flour (4 cups)
pinch salt
put half the water in a bowl with the sugar (or honey) and yeast. In another bowl, put the flour. Make a well in the flour and add the yeast mixture. Add the salt. Squish in by hand to mix until dough feels ‘silky’ in your hand, not sticky.
Knead dough on floured board, adding flour as needed to make a thick dough. Let rise 1 hour. Punch down, shape and put in greased pans and let rise again for 45 min.
Bake 50-60 min at 375 degrees. This is a tasty loaf and easy to make.

SNACK CAKE
1 2/3 c flour
1 c packed brown sugar
1/4 c unsweetened cocoa powder
1 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1 c water
1/3 c oil
1 tsp vinegar
1/2 tsp vanilla
Mix dry ingredients. Stir in liquid ingredients completely. Pour into an ungreased 8 inch square cake pan and bake at 350 for 30-40 min or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool. Dust with powdered sugar just before serving to decorate it.
Applesauce cake variation:
Omit cocoa and vanilla. Stir 1 1/2 tsp ground allspice into the flour mixture. Reduce water to 1/2 cup and stir in 1/2 c applesauce or grated apples.
Chocolate chip cake variation:
Omit cocoa and vanilla. Stir in 1/3 c chopped nuts into flour mixture. Sprinkle 1/3 c mini chocolate chips over the batter in the pan.
Double Chocolate cake:
Sprinkle 1/2 c semi sweet chocolate chips over the cocoa batter in the pan.
Maple Nut cake: Omit cocoa and vanilla. Stir 1/2 cup chopped pecans into the flour mixture and 1/2 tsp maple extract into the water.

STIR CRAZY CAKE (one 8x8 inch pan)
2 1/2 cup flour
1 1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup cocoa
2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
2/3 cup oil
2 TB vinegar
1 TB vanilla
2 cups cold coffee
1/4 cups sugar
1/2 tsp cinnamon
Put flour, 1 1/2 cup sugar, cocoa, baking soda, and salt in an 8x8 inch pan. Stir with a fork to mix; form 3 wells in flour mixture. Pour oil into one well, vinegar in one, and vanilla in one. Pour cold coffee over all ingredients and stir with fork until well mixed. Combine remaining sugar and cinnamon; sprinkle over batter.
Bake at 350 for 35-45 min.

HOW TO DRY SOURDOUGH STARTER
Place starter on a plastic lined dehydrator tray and dry at 90ºF (no hotter, you don’t want to cook it). Measure the starter you put on each tray so you know how much a cup of starter dries down to. When dry, powder in a blender, and store in a sealed plastic bag.
To use, take the equivalent of 1 cup starter and stir into 3/4 cup lukewarm water. Stir in 3/4 cup white flour, and keep in a non-metal dish. Cover with plastic wrap and a tea towel. Store 48 hours in a warm (85º) place. Then refrigerate loosely lidded. When you plan to use it, add 2 c flour and 2 c warm water and let sit in warm place 12 hours, loosely covered. Save 1 cup for the next batch, and use the rest as sourdough leavening.
 

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Hi, Davarm!!

BUG OUT FOODS, ANYONE?

These foods do not qualify as low additive foods. They are made from common, processed foods with an eye to cost and convenience.

Most recipes state they will keep only a month at room temperature, 6 months refrigerated, and 1 year frozen. I rotate them every 6 months and keep them refrigerated or frozen, packed in a single package to snatch and stuff the pail on the way out the door. (If I had enough room in the freezer I’d freeze the whole pail!)

NOT JUST CUP-O-SOUP
Dehydrating soup is a snap, and you can dry your own recipes. I dehydrated split pea soup to a powder, just to see if it would work. It stored on the kitchen shelf 6 months (it was fat-free) before I had it as a cup-o-soup. It was great, and inspired me to dehydrate some extra chili (meat and all). That was great, too. You will need a dehydrator with leather trays, or you can cut waxed paper to fit screen trays. Spread the soup evenly, and dehydrate at 145º F for 8-15 hours. Check after 4 hours and turn over the partially dry soup if you can to let both sides dry and to speed drying. If will get brittle. When it is hard-dry, remove from tray. Crumble chunky soup, crush cream types, and package in air-tight containers. Store in the freezer up to a year; keeps at room temperature about a month. To use, put desired amount of soup in a cup (I use about 1/2 cup of my thick soups) and add boiling water to fill the cup, leaving some stirring room. Stir, then set aside to cool. The soup will rehydrate pretty well by the time it is cool enough to drink.
You can dehydrate spaghetti casserole and chow mein the same way for ‘instant dinner’.

DRINKS

COCOA MIX (makes 2 1/2 cups)
1/3 c sugar or splenda
1/3 c cocoa
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 c instant dry milk powder
1/2 c good tasting coffee creamer
Combine, mix well. 5 TB added to 2/3 cup hot water is one serving. For mocha add 1 tsp instant coffee to the cup when you add the hot water.

PUDDING NOG (for quick energy)
4 TB instant pudding mix
2 heaping tsp coffee creamer
2/3 c instant dry milk powder
In camp, mix with 2 cups hot water to dissolve as a hot drink.

Some sources mention drinking Jell-O while it is still warm and liquid as an energy drink. It is too sweet for my taste under normal circumstances, but on the move would be a welcome treat.

CLASSIC INSTANT SPICED TEA
1 c instant tea
1 pkg. lemonade mix (unsweetened Kool-Aid)
1 tsp cinnamon
1 cup tang
1/2 c powdered sugar or splenda
1/2 tsp ground cloves
Use 2 tsp per cup hot water for energy.

INSTANT MOCHA
2/3 c instant coffee
1 c creamer powder
1 c cocoa mix
1/2 c sugar substitute (or sugar if you don’t mind the calories)
Combine and store. Use 2-3 heaping tsp per cup of hot water.

QUICK EMERGENCY SOUP (1 serving)
1 TB powdered vegetables of choice
4 TB instant dry milk powder
2 TB instant mashed potato flakes
Mix. To use, combine with 6 oz boiling water and serve. Hasty and tasty. Optional additions: butter buds, bouillon powder, cheese powder, bacon bits, or herbs.

ALMOST INSTANT MEATS

GROUND ROUND JERKY
1 lb fresh ground round steak
1 TB Morton’s Tender Quick
1 tsp sugar
1/2 tsp pepper
optional: 1/2 tsp chili powder
optional: 1/2 tsp garlic powder
Mix all ingredients very well and knead to make sure seasoning distributes evenly through the meat. Refrigerate one hour to blend flavors. Roll out to 1/8 inch thick or less (or use a jerky cannon). Dry on paper towel lined tray in dehydrator set at 145-155º F. After 1 hour, blot off excess oil and flip strips over. Repeat blotting and flipping hourly until dry enough to suit. Keeps 1 week at room temperature, 1 month refrigerated and 6 months frozen.

PSEUDO CHIPPED BEEF (OR HAM OR TURKEY)
Purchase deli-thin sliced cold cuts (like Buddig) from the grocer. Dehydrate until crispy (145º F). This will look like chipped beef. May be eaten as-is or creamed. You can dry these shredded for on-the-march food. Keeps 1 month without refrigeration; 6 months if refrigerated, up to a year frozen.

HAM JERKY
Remove all fat from fully coked ham and slice not more than 3/8 inch thick. Dry until crisp at 145-155 degrees. Eat as-is or reconstitute. Keeps 1 month without refrigeration, up to 6 months in refrigerator and 12 months frozen.

CANADIAN BACON BITS
Remove fat from Canadian bacon and dice fine. Dry with paper towels underneath, as it sheds oil while it dries. Store same as ground round jerky.

TUNA
Water pack tuna dehydrates best. Dry like the pseudo chipped beef. Keep refrigerated or freeze for storing longer than 1 month. Add to white sauce for ‘tuna-noodle’ over ramen noodles. Good mixed with instant mashed potatoes if you like hot tuna.

SMALL SHRIMP from a drained can of shrimp will dehydrate for a luxurious addition to a cream soup. Keep in refrigerator as they won’t keep over 1 month without refrigeration. To tell you the truth, it works, but the can of shrimp is so small I just carry the can unless I am packing ultra-light.

SAUCE AND GRAVY MIXES

WHITE SAUCE MIX (makes 1/3 generous cup of mix)
1 tsp dried onion dices
1/4 tsp dry parsley
1/2 tsp dry celery flakes (you can dry celery leaves in a paper sack and make your own)
1 TB flour
1/4 tsp salt
1/3 c instant dry milk powder
Combine with 1 cup water until smooth. (You can use a shaker jar or blend in by hand.)
Cook and stir over medium heat until it thickens. Good with cut up leftovers, chipped bee, tuna or with 4 TB dehydrated cheese melted in. The entire recipe makes 1 cup sauce.

TOMATO SAUCE MIX (Makes 6 TB plus 2 tsp mix)
1 TB dry onion
1/2 tsp oregano
1/2 tsp sugar
3 TB tomato powder
2 TB flour
1 heaping tsp beef bouillon powder
Combine ingredients. Makes enough for 2 cups sauce. To use, melt 2 TB any fat in a skillet, shake mix with 1 1/2 c water and stir into the melted fat. Cook & stir until thick.
Makes 2 cups sauce.

GRAVY MIX (makes 1 cup mix for 5 3/4 cups of gravy)
11 2/3 TB flour
6 TB bouillon powder of choice
5 pinches of chosen herbs
Combine and mix well. To use, mix 2 3/4 TB mix with 1 cups water; cook and stir over med heat until it boils 2 min. Makes 1 cup gravy.
Herbs for beef: basil, marjoram, savory, oregano. Herbs for chicken: sage, savory, thyme, marjoram. Herbs for pork: sage, savory.

OTHER USEFUL CAMP FOODS

SCRAMBLED EGG MIX (2 servings)
6 TB dry egg powder
1/3 c dry milk
1/2 tsp parsley flakes
1/2 tsp celery flakes
1/2 tsp salt
Mix with 1/3 c lukewarm water and beat hard to make smooth. Scramble and season as desired.

SIMPLE FRUIT LEATHER (from canned fruit)
Drain canned fruit very, very well, and puree in a blender. Spread on a leather drying tray (my tray came with directions to spray with cooking oil for easy removal of finished leather. If you have no leather tray line your dehydrator tray with plastic wrap. You can dry leathers on a plastic wrap line cookie sheet with sides, for oven drying or even outdoors (put cheesecloth or screening over the top, not touching, to keep out flying vermin. Dry at 140ºF until edges start to curl. Flip over and dry the other side. Touch the center to check for dryness. In a dehydrator the approximate drying time is 6-8 hours; in an oven up to 18 hours, in the sun 1-2 days. Dry until merely tacky for eating soon; for storing store until leathery. When dried to suit, remove from the plastic and roll up. Let cool, then re-roll in plastic wrap. Keeps up to 1 month unrefrigerated; up to 1 year frozen.

OTHER LEATHERS
This general technique also works well for dehydrating a pureed tomato sauce, salsa, pumpkin pie filling, and barbecue sauce. You can rehydrate those in a little hot water when you want to use some. Fruit rolls generally are eaten dried, but you can add a little hot water to fruit roll to make a field ‘jelly’. Some sources mention ‘yogurt drops’ made like fruit leather, but I have not tried those (yet). They are supposed to have a taffy-like texture which might not carry well in a pack.

TRINITY SEASONING MIX: Equal parts dry celery leaves or flakes, dried onions, dried parsley. Use as a seasoning in soups, stews, etc. Ads a flavor punch to plain fare with no chopping on site.

SLOPPY JOE MIX (enough for 8 buns OR 4 people)
1 TB dry onions
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/4 tsp mustard powder
1 tsp cornstarch
1/4 tsp celery seed
1/2 tsp chili powder
1 tsp dried green pepper
1 tsp salt
3 TB tomato powder
Combine, mix well. Package in a larger bag with 1 cup dehydrated cooked hamburger and one 6-oz can of tomato paste. To cook, stir meat, seasonings and paste into 2 cups water and simmer 10 min or so until done.

CHILI MIX WITHOUT BEANS (makes 4 cups chili)
1 1/2 tsp flour
2 TB tomato powder
3/4 tsp chili powder
1/4 tsp each garlic powder, seasoned salt, cumin and sugar
1/3 tsp dry onions, and ground red pepper
Combine. Pack 1 1/2 c dry cooked ground beef separately. To make, pour 1/2 c hot water over the ground beef to rehydrate it. When it is soft, add water to make 2 cups liquid total. Stir in chili mix and simmer.

DRIED PRE-COOKED BEANS
To dehydrate, spread cooked beans evenly on trays and dry at 145 degrees. They should be completely dry. They won't stick together like fruit leather, they'll be separate and they are rather fragile, so avoid crushing them. Package with a vacuum packaging machine, with Seal-A-Meal, or in ziplocs, and store in refrigerator until ready to use. Two cups when dry weighs 8 oz, and 1 1/4 cups dried beans makes 1 large backpacker's serving. In Camp: Rehydrate with 1/2 to 3/4 cup water per 1 1/4 cups beans, depending on the dish you're making. The beans will rehydrate in 10 to 15 minutes. Heat and serve.

SURVIVAL BARS (FRUIT FLAVORED)
1 recipe contains 1560 calories, 268 grams carbohydrate, 120 grams protein and 24 grams fiber. You can eat it dry or cook in a little warm water.
3 cups quick oats
1 c brown sugar substitute*
1 TB boiling water
2 1/2 c instant dry milk
1 TB honey
1/2 package of diet Jell-O*, 3 ounce size
Dissolve Jell-O and honey in hot water. Add remaining ingredients and mix very well. Add warm water one tablespoon at a time until mixture will mold and hold together. Pack firmly in a greased foil-lined pan, and place in the oven to dry at the oven’s lowest setting (if it is over 250 degrees, leave the door ajar. You want this to dry, not cook. When dry, cut or break in 2 inch pieces. Wrap in foil and store in freezer until needed. It tastes like fruit flavored oatmeal and is not unpalatable uncooked.
*The original recipe called for brown sugar and regular Jell-O which would raise the calories significantly for use by a very active person with no sugar restrictions.
 

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Thank you, kappydell, I had a sneaken feeling you would come through on this. These are going in my archive.

Does anyone have any favorites using dehydrated potatoes? Alot of us are drying them and it seems that few have any recipes for them.

I use them in soups and to make "Cheesey Potatoes", The next time I make them I will "MEASURE" everything and post that recipe, for those who dont know I dont measure anything so my recipes are kinda hard to pass on.
Spuds are one of my favorite comfort foods! I'll be lookin up those dehydrated potato recipes for you! Off the top of my head I have recipes for camp hash browns, several potato soups, potato patties, potato noodles, not to mention potato dumplings. We should be building quite a cookbook.....!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Spuds are one of my favorite comfort foods! I'll be lookin up those dehydrated potato recipes for you! Off the top of my head I have recipes for camp hash browns, several potato soups, potato patties, potato noodles, not to mention potato dumplings. We should be building quite a cookbook.....!
I'm not much of an editor but I am copying all the recipes as they come in, If no one that knows what they are doing steps up to put it together I will do it. It may need a lot of final work but a cook book with this type of info could be a real help to many.

BTW, glanced over your last post(haven't read it completely) and I have been looking for that Cocoa Mix for a while and havent been able to find it anywhere, Thanks.

Someone, I dont remember who, made a post about Turkey Jerky using deli type meat. I had a cheap "Corn King" Ham Loaf in the fridge and tried making jerky out of it and it was surprisingly good. Plan to get more of those "Pretend Ham" type of loafs and make a lot more when they go back on sale. The whole loafs(dont remember the weight but they were pretty big), sold for around $5 and change, the regular price was around $12.00 - $13.00.
 

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I'm not much of an editor but I am copying all the recipes as they come in, If no one that knows what they are doing steps up to put it together I will do it. It may need a lot of final work but a cook book with this type of info could be a real help to many.

BTW, glanced over your last post(haven't read it completely) and I have been looking for that Cocoa Mix for a while and havent been able to find it anywhere, Thanks.

Someone, I dont remember who, made a post about Turkey Jerky using deli type meat. I had a cheap "Corn King" Ham Loaf in the fridge and tried making jerky out of it and it was surprisingly good. Plan to get more of those "Pretend Ham" type of loafs and make a lot more when they go back on sale. The whole loafs(dont remember the weight but they were pretty big), sold for around $5 and change, the regular price was around $12.00 - $13.00.
Yes, corned beef is good - im not much of a fan but it works great accordinto my late spouse who was a corned-beef man....
 

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Texan
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Discussion Starter #16
Well people, I am working on one as I type that may get the interest of some of you. Many of us have developed a taste for cheese and different cheese products, me included. I have successfully canned cheese, mostly Velveeta and I know of at least one forum member who has canned cheddar successfully.

Do any of you make cheese at home? Im pretty sure the answer to that is a yes, but how many of you have made it with Powdered Milk?

I had a wild thought tonight while I was going over some of my dehydrated recipe ideas and I thought "Why Not" try making Mozzarella from powdered milk?

Well I did it! The ball of cheese that formed was not Perfect Mozzarella, it seemed kind of dry but that was probably because I used milk with 0% milk fat. Milk that is normally used has some milk fat in it which may be why it is softer and more moist, further experiments will tell for sure.

Anyway, here is how I did it.

I used 1 25.6 ounce box of Non Fat Dry Milk mixed with 16 cups of hot water.

I put the pan with the milk in it in a larger pan filled with water(double boiler) and brought it up to about 140 degreese.

I then put in 1/4 cup of distilled white vinegar in and stired it constantly for about 5 minutes. The curds started forming immediately .

I then let the pot stand for about 15 minutes to cool down and "finish up". The Whey is a light green color.

I dipped the Curd out and into a colander lined with cheese cloth and starting "twisting" it to remove excess water.

After it cooled, I put it in a bowl of Whey to sit until I can figure out what to do with it.

My youngest daughter and I cut a piece and tasted it, her comment was her standard answer for things that I do that pleasantly surprise her "Dad, That just isnt right".

It was pretty good and was recognizable as Mozzarella. It needs some work such as salting the milk before the vinegar is added but it is a keeper.

The 1 pound 9.6 ounce box of powdered milk produced 1 pound 5 ozs of cheese.
I brought a #10 sized can of Whole Milk Powder out of the "Pantry" and gave a try at making cheese out of whole milk rather than the Non Fat Dry Milk Powder.

It was a completely different experience. First, I used 7 cups of Milk Powder, to 7 quarts of "HOT" water.

I put it in the double boiler and 3/4 cup of distilled white vinegar and stirred. The curdling did not start immediately but progressed fairly slowly and when it seemed to stop, I removed it from the double boiler and let it sit for about 1/2 hour.

The curd did not melt together like with the skim milk and did not form as big curds. But I strained it through cheese cloth placed in a colander then pressed it with a gallon jug of water for about an hour.

What I got was neither Mozzarella or curds that would form a brick. I do not know what to do with this, but I will let it firm up for a while then put it back in the whey overnight and see what it turns into in the morning.

If any of you have any cheese experience I could use the Help???

7 cups of Whole Milk Powder
7 quarts of water
Produced 42 ounces of "Stuff", cheese I presume....Tasted like Feta or Ricotta
 

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Texan
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Discussion Starter #17
We decided that the "stuff" made from whole milk powder is Feta so I packed it into a quart jar and put it in the fridge and am going to make a pasta dish tomorrow(or later today) and use in place of the Feta.

The leftover that would not fit in the quart jar, I put in a blender with a drained can of black olives and a clove of raw garlic and pureed it. I slowly poured the black olive juice in until the blender "caught" and started blending. This is some Good Stuff. Tasted none better(that I remember 30 years ago) while I was stationed in Italy.

The taste definitely was not hindered by it being made from milk powder.
 

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TMI Baked Oatmeal
* ½ cup oil
* 1 cup sugar (wht.or brn.)
* 2 eggs , beaten
* 3 cups oatmeal
* 2 teaspoons baking powder
* 1 teaspoon salt
* 1 cup milk

Directions:
Mix together oil, sugar and eggs. Add oatmeal, baking powder, salt and milk. Bake 30 minute at 350°. Serve with warm sweetened milk with cinnamon.

This can be made very easily with powdered milk and eggs (or mayo). We used to eat it all the time that way, actually! The recipe is from a book called Feeding the Multitudes - it uses mainly #10 can portions and is good, hearty food. I scaled it down to feed 6, this recipe normally feeds 30.
 
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