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performing monkey
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4,230 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I didn't want to put some of the things I have done, as:

1. there is some danger involved

2. it's probably a form of tresspass

3. don't want to expose this forum to liability issues

that being said, don't try this @ home (unless you KNOW wtf you're doing)

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If you need a to hide something (small enough to carry) or even a place to hide/squat in the 'big city' look to the elevators, particularly the elevator shafts, pits, overheads (primary and secondary), and machine rooms. Larger buildings are better, as they have more elevators

First, know what kind of elevator it is, oildraulic (underneath or sidepost piston) usually used 2-5 floors... sometimes as much as 10 floors, cabled (standard traction, compound roped, basement machine) usually used greater than 5 floors , or a "roped hydro". I will discuss cabled traction machines because it is traditionally the most used in movies/TV/books.

The machine room is the safest place because it is designed for personnel to routinely visit to perform maintenance duties; it is always warm to excrutiatingly hot, and the maintenance/service person usually has a desk or work area as well as books/magazines maybe snacks & drinks or even booze. Do NOT touch ANYTHING that you do not know what it is, because this room is only "safe" by comparison, it still has many electrical and mechanical hazards to beware of (governors, traction shivs, controll panels, arcing relays, cables, selectors, generators etc etc).

The elevator pit is that part of an elevator shaft that extends from the threshold level of the lowest landing door down to the floor at the very bottom of the shaft, it is a minimum of 60" deep and many larger building have what is called a 'walk-in' pit that is an entire floor below that. I have seen this non-room used as shelter in the past. There are electrical and mechanical hazards here also, it also may be damp or semi-prone to flooding as any basement area is. The travel cable hangs under the car & travels into the pit... it WILL kill you, if you are not careful. The counterweights also travel into the pit EVERY time the elevator goes to the top floor, they are called the silent killer by those in the business and kill more service/maintenance people than any other elevator-related hazard post-construction.

(to be continued)
 

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Great post, I sell elevator maintenance parts, never considdered this. Stuff can also be hidden in airvents and above drop ceilings.
 

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YourAdministrator, eh?
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I make elevator parts (counter-weights, mounts, guides, etc) at work. One of my good friends was the maintenance-guy for a building, so, I had access to the entire maintenance-section. I have seen how the systems work in order to keep a building warm, cool, running, etc.

Knowing how those zones are setup, yes, something could be stashed in there, but, I would need a hall-pass in order to get into those sections. If the power was out, I would never be able to get into them without the manual-bypass key. Also, being the lowest point in the building (4 to 6 stories underground), water-damage would be a huge possibility if the pumps sieze or there is natural flooding happening.

Personally, I feel that the stash needs to be easily accessable in a place that that there is permission to place there. Yes, a person could pop up a man-hole-cover and put a water-proof container (sealed PVC-pipe), but, just imagine the hoopla if a city maintenance-worker finds it during spring-cleaning and the cops are called and the media is called and they blow-up the "bomb" only to find your underwear and a few power-bars "just-in-case".
 

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performing monkey
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4,230 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
too true, Naekid, but I have also serviced buildings where NOBODY has gone, in years!

Also, when they decommission an elevator, normally all that is done is the counterweights (if applicable) are lowered to the pit (sometimes spectacularly... snip snip boom ;) ); then the car is lowered to the bottom floor and "pinned" into place (where it is usually used as an impromptu closet/storage space); and the cables dropped down the shaft; the machinery is usually left because scrap prices aren't high enough (at the moment) to warrant the expense of removal; the hatch doors at every floor are secured shut 'permanently' :rolleyes: :sssh: in a variety of ways. Once the final inspection to see that this has been done has been performed the elevator is actually taken off the books :eek:
 
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