Preserving Eggs

Discussion in 'General Food and Foraging Discussion' started by cybergranny, May 25, 2011.

  1. cybergranny

    cybergranny Well-Known Member

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  2. *Andi

    *Andi Supporting Member

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    I have used lard much in the same way, which worked well also.

    Thanks for posting.:2thumb:
     

  3. rwc1969

    rwc1969 Well-Known Member

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    That's interesting, thanks. I'll have to give it a try with a few eggs.
     
  4. snappy1

    snappy1 Well-Known Member

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    Wonder if that works as well down South. Even keeping them as cool as possible with no refrig., I have my doubts. Guess I will try it when we get moved.
     
  5. *Andi

    *Andi Supporting Member

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    A root cellar or a spring house in the south ... should work. ;)
     
  6. lotsoflead

    lotsoflead Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to try it with a dozen this morning.
    before many people had refrigeration we would buy a case or gross of eggs in Nov to store in the root cellar to use all winter, if the water trick had been heard of, we didn't know about it, that's where bad eggs will float if they're no good.we went by the smell, but we also sold and traded eggs so they were not a problem on the farm.

    I have broke eggs one at a time, stirred it a little with 1/4 ts P of salt, put them in ice cube trays and frooze them, they were edible after six months, but not very tasty.
     
  7. cybergranny

    cybergranny Well-Known Member

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    My aunt had us wipe off the eggs with a slightly damp rag if they were dirty. She raised chickens for meat and eggs. I never knew why we didn't wash them. We're talking over 50 years ago. I have a thought......store bought eggs are sanitized. The lady in the article said that is what she used. So if you're raising your own chickens, do you think you have to wash them and then apply the mineral oil/lard?
     
  8. *Andi

    *Andi Supporting Member

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    I used only clean eggs from the hens house ... if they were "dirty" they were just used in day to day cooking. (after I cleaned them :D)

    but that's just me ... ;)
     
  9. tsrwivey

    tsrwivey Supporting Member

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    I've known people that kept their eggs in the kitchen cabinet & had done so all their lives. Butter, too.
     
  10. *Andi

    *Andi Supporting Member

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  11. Jimmy24

    Jimmy24 Member

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    Not this far south....you will keep them inside where the a/c controls the enviroment. No spring houses or root cellars here. They would be just as hot...:(

    My grandparents knew of this, but they said it was just to hot here. Worked well in the winter though.

    Jimmy
     
  12. wildone_uk

    wildone_uk Active Member

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    many thanks for this,this is new to me so i will give it try this weekend.laurence
     
  13. Centraltn

    Centraltn Well-Known Member

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    U had chickens.. lots of em for years. Being Rhode Island Reds, primarily- with a few buff orpingtons for setting- they layed abundantly, and with a timed light in the coop, layed well even in winter. There were times, however that we were inundated with eggs.. so I had to learn how to keep them.
    You can also freeze them thusly: For cooking with the eggs (breakfasts etc) scramble them up.. a dozen or so at a time. Add a teaspoon of salt and scramble well. Pour these into ice cube trays and freeze. One cube = roughly 1 egg.
    For use in baking or other cooking, scramble that doz up with 1 tsp of honey and freeze the same way. After the eggs are all frozen, transfer them into freezer bags.. labelled well - "for cooking" (for the ones with salt) and "for baking" on the bag holding the ones with honey.
     
  14. *Andi

    *Andi Supporting Member

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    I guess I was thinking more of a :shtf: where you have no a/c that controls the enviroment... My cellar stays right at 60 (give or take) in the summer. Yesterday the temps were in the mid 90's :)gaah:) and my cellar was 62 ... So is 62 a great temp for the cellar ... no, but better than in the house with temps near 90. ;) (I working on Not turning on the a/c ... We will see how that works ... :eek:)