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Whats your opinion on article from Newsweek

  • News bashing preppers

    Votes: 3 10.7%
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    Votes: 23 82.1%
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I am a little teapot
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I voted good news on preppers, but I want to make some clarifications. First of all, I didn't view the movie clip because it wouldn't download on my dial up connection.

I liked the fact that they used a "soccer mom" for their case study. It shows that we are not all armed wackos hiding in a shack in the mountains, as the article pointed out. Some parts near the end seemed a little paronizing to me but on the whole I thought it was ok. As for myself, I'd never appear in print or on camera discussing being a prepper because I'd rather "hide among the sheeple" if you will, and not be known as a prepper. It was nice, however, that a couple people were willing to do so so that the public can see that we are normal , not radical, people. A little less afraid than most to speak our minds, maybe, but far from radical. I liked how it pointed out that we are all prepping, but not for the same reason. I fear natural disaster and short term grid disruption more than the fall of the government and total anarchy. That's just me. Others may disagree and we're all ok with that. I'm trying to grow more food and Canadian (remember him? :) ) has no interest in growing his own food.

In short, I liked the article.

That's my 2 cents.
 

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Even though it came from Newsweek, I liked the article. For those reeaders who are truly fair-minded I think it might open a few eyes.
 

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Thanks for posting the link!
 

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—their paranoia compounded by 24-hour cable news. This is what got me. Like with out cable you can't tell the direction the worlds is headed.

I don't prep out of paranoia.
 

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Just saw this on the web, not bad...Rise of the Preppers: America's New Survivalists - Newsweek.com
didn't seem like bashing to me, what do you think, bashing, good for the movement, no opinion.
Interesting article. Something that I think I will forward onto several others who I would like to interest more in prepping ...

In case that original link goes down, here is a copy / paste of the info:

Newsweek-part1 said:
Survivalism Lite
They call themselves 'preppers.' They are regular people with homes and families. But like the survivalists that came before them, they're preparing for the worst.

Lisa Bedford is what you'd imagine of a stereotypical soccer mom. She drives a white Tahoe SUV. An American flag flies outside her suburban Phoenix home. She sells Pampered Chef kitchen tools and likes to bake. Bedford and her husband have two young children, four dogs, and go to church on Sunday.

But about a year ago, Bedford's homemaking skills went into overdrive. She began stockpiling canned food, and converted a spare bedroom into a giant storage facility. The trunk of each of her family's cars got its own 72-hour emergency kit-giant Tupperware containers full of iodine, beef jerky, emergency blankets, and even a blood-clotting agent designed for the battle-wounded. Bedford started thinking about an escape plan in case her family needed to leave in a hurry, and she and her husband set aside packed suitcases and cash. Then, for the first time in her life, Bedford went to a gun range and shot a .22 handgun. Now she regularly takes her two young children, 7 and 10, to target practice. "Over the last two years, I started feeling more and more unsettled about everything I was seeing, and I started thinking, 'What if we were in the same boat?'" says Bedford, 49.

Bedford is what you might call a modern-day survivalist-or, as she describes it, a "prepper". (Prepper.org) Far from the stereotype of survivalists past, she owns no camouflage, and she doesn't believe that 2012-the final year of the Mayan calendar-will be the end of the world. She likes modern luxuries (makeup, air conditioning, going out to eat), and she's no doomsayer. But like the rest of us, Bedford watched as the housing bubble burst and the economy collapsed. She has friends who've lost their homes, jobs, and 401(k)s. She remembers Hurricane Katrina, and wonders how the government might respond to the next big disaster, or a global pandemic. And though she hopes for the best-the last thing she wants is for something bad to happen-she's decided to prepare her family for the worst. "We never set out to go build a bunker to protect ourselves from nuclear fallout; I have no idea how to camp in the wild," Bedford says, laughing. "But as all of this stuff started hitting closer to home, we [wanted] to take some steps to safeguard ourselves."

In the past, survivalists and conspiracy theorists might go out into the woods, live out of a bunker, waiting (or sometimes hoping) for the apocalypse to hit. It was men, mostly; many of them antigovernment, often portrayed by the media as radicals of the likes of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh. In the late 1990s, Y2K fears brought survivalism to the mainstream, only to usher it back out again when disaster didn't strike. (Suddenly, unused survival gear began showing up in classifieds and on eBay.) A decade later, "preppers" are what you might call survivalism's Third Wave: regular people with jobs and homes whose are increasingly fearful about the future-their paranoia compounded by 24-hour cable news. "Between the media and the Internet, many people have built up a sense that there's this calamity out there that needs to be avoided," says Art Markman, a cognitive psychologist at the University of Texas who studies the way people think. And while they may not envision themselves as Kevin Costner in Waterworld-in fact, many preppers go out of their way to avoid the stereotypes that come along with the "survivalist" label-they've made a clear-eyed calculation about the risks at hand and aren't waiting around for anybody else to fix them. "I consider it more of a reaction than a movement," says Tom Martin, a 32-year-old Idaho truck driver who is the founder of the American Preppers Network, which receives some 5,000 visitors to its Web site each day. "There are so many variables and potential disasters out there, being a prepper is just a reaction to that potential."
 

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And here is part two of the text. I will see if I can link in the video as well from that original link in another reply.

Newsweek-part2 said:
That reaction, of course, means different things to different people. Some prep for economic disaster, while others prep to escape genetically modified foods. An organic farmer could be considered a prepper; so might an urban gardener. Some preppers fear putting their names out in public-they don't want every desperate soul knocking down their door in the event of a disaster-while others see it as a network they can rely upon were something horrible to happen. Some preppers fear the complete breakdown of society, while others simply want to stock up on extra granola bars and lighter fluid in case of a blackout or a storm. Hard-core survivalists might think of preppers as soft; "Eventually, the Chef Boyardee is going to run out," jokes Cody Lundin, the founder of the Aboriginal Living Skills School, a survival camp based out of his home in Prescott, Az. But prepping, says Martin, is just a new word for a very old way of life. "You don't have to have a survival retreat loaded with guns secluded in the wilderness to be a prepper," adds David Hill Sr., 54, a former jet mechanic who runs the Web site WhatisaPrepper from his home in rural West Virginia. "There are many people who live in urban and suburban areas who don't own guns who also identify themselves as preppers."

While there's no scientific data to track survivalism's recent growth, some preppers have speculated it's reached a level not matched in decades. Emergency-supply retailers say they're seeing business boom; the Red Cross has had a surge in volunteers over the past year (up some 160,000 over 2008), and there are networks of preppers-from Prepper.org to the Suburban Prepper, to Bedford's own blog, "The Survival Mom"-sprouting up all over the Web. FEMA's new head under Obama, Craig Fugate, has encouraged Americans to get in touch with their inner survivalist. "I encourage all Americans to take some simple steps to make their families more prepared, such as developing a family communications plan," he tells NEWSWEEK. His organization recently launched a "Resolve to be Ready" campaign suggesting that Americans to make preparedness part of their New Year's resolutions. "I think what people have come to realize is that [organizations like ours] can't always be everywhere we need to be as quickly as we need to be," says Jonathan Aiken, a spokesman for the American Red Cross. "So I think the messaging has changed, from FEMA on down, that in the event of an emergency, people need to be prepared to take care of themselves for a couple of days until the rest of us can come out and get to you."

Government has always played an active role in emergency preparedness. Nuclear-raid drills were part of everyday life for school children in the 1950s and '60s, and building bomb shelters was encouraged because of the nuclear threat. In 1999, the government set up a $50 million crisis center to deal with the computer threats posed by Y2K, and after 9/11, residents were pushed to stock up on plastic and duct tape to seal their homes in the event of a biological attack. But in 2010, as we enter the new year under an elevated threat level, the problems at hand can seem insurmountable and unknown, to the point that even Barton M. Biggs, the former chief global strategist at Morgan Stanley, warns in his 2008 book that we must "assume the possibility of a breakdown of the civilized infrastructure." Where that leaves preppers is struggling to fill the void. "We want people to understand that preparedness is an individual's job, too," says Joseph Bruno, New York City's commissioner of emergency management, where polling has shown that more than 50 percent of residents are thinking about preparedness-up from just 18 percent in 2004. "I'm a newsaholic, and that probably feeds some of this," says Bedford. "But I like to think that if we're prepared, it's one less family the government has to worry about."

In the end, what it all boils down to, at least for the preppers, is self-reliance-a concept as old as the human race itself. As survival blogger Joe Solomon pointed out in a recent column, during the Victory Gardens of WWII, Americans managed to grow 40 percent of all the vegetables they needed to survive. "My mother's parents had a 10-acre garden, and my grandfather worked at the dairy farm next door," says Hill, the former jet mechanic. "They worked by raising their own food, they had their own chickens, they canned vegetables, and my grandfather fed a family of 12 like that." But in the modern world, he says, many of those skills are easily forgotten. Today, our food comes from dozens of different sources. Most of us aren't quite sure how electricity gets from the wires to our stoves. We use debit cards to buy a can of tuna and we wouldn't have the slightest idea how to filter contaminated water. We are residents of the new millennium; we simply haven't needed to prepare.

So for the moment, people like Bedford are reteaching themselves lost skills-and in some cases, learning new ones. Bedford has read up on harvesting an urban garden, and is learning to use a solar oven to bake bread. She is ready with a pointed shot in the event she ever needs to hunt for her own food. And until then, she's got 61 cans of chili, 20 cans of Spam, 24 jars of peanut butter, and much more stocked in her pantry; she estimates she's spent about $4,000 on food supplies, an amount that should keep her family going for at least three months. Now, even if something simple goes wrong, like a paycheck doesn't go through, "we don't need to worry," she says.

Bedford knows it all might sound a little nuts-and she's careful about how much she reveals, and to whom. But she believes that in times of uncertainty, what she's doing is simply common sense. As for the rest of us, isn't it a little bit crazy not to prepare?

Editor's Note: This story has been updated to include comment from FEMA head Craig Fugate.
 

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This is a great video clip, I plan on sharing it with a few people, including my wife. They may think I am normal. Sail
 

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Theys will never thinks i is normal :p. But after our little snow storm before christmass. I,am getting a little more positive feed back on thing's. Because of me they stayed warm,dry,well fed. Some folks in the neighborhood did not even have a flashlight, jezz! it's still hard to figure some people. But i think everyone in our general area have had a slap in the head being 4 days without electric. This part of the country is full of prepper's, not in the tv sense. A lot of folk's grow garden's around here and have extra heat. Some just did not think it could happen to them. Still cannot get my head around not even having a flashlight in the house. I think the article was some what of a positive take on it as a whole.
 

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kyfarmer, you think that's bad.

I was talking with a co-worker yesterday kind of jokingly about stocking up on beans-n-rice for Y2K. She asked if I was one of those crazies. So, I explained to her that at the time I was a computer-tech and I was testing / upgrading thousands of computers to be Y2K-compliant, so, I figured that I might as well stock up on food-supplies as well.

Her reply to me was "I only eat fresh-food, so, I go to the grocery-store daily for my fresh supplies". She said that she doesn't even purchase frozen-foods. I commented about dried or canned food - she looked at me like I was the crazy one. I told her about making my own pasta and pasta sauces, drying the pasta and canning my own sauces - again, she looked at me like I was crazy.

It was a real eye-opener that there are people who have no problems spending the huge money for fresh fruits and vegies through-out the winter. Makes me wonder what her "carbon footprint" is with all the shipping that she has to support for her daily food requirements.
 

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Takes its toll on the wallet too. :nuts:
 

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kyfarmer, you think that's bad.

I was talking with a co-worker yesterday kind of jokingly about stocking up on beans-n-rice for Y2K. She asked if I was one of those crazies. So, I explained to her that at the time I was a computer-tech and I was testing / upgrading thousands of computers to be Y2K-compliant, so, I figured that I might as well stock up on food-supplies as well.

Her reply to me was "I only eat fresh-food, so, I go to the grocery-store daily for my fresh supplies". She said that she doesn't even purchase frozen-foods. I commented about dried or canned food - she looked at me like I was the crazy one. I told her about making my own pasta and pasta sauces, drying the pasta and canning my own sauces - again, she looked at me like I was crazy.

It was a real eye-opener that there are people who have no problems spending the huge money for fresh fruits and vegies through-out the winter. Makes me wonder what her "carbon footprint" is with all the shipping that she has to support for her daily food requirements.
You can look for that one to be beating at your door one day. If she makes it that far. :nuts:
 

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You can look for that one to be beating at your door one day. If she makes it that far. :nuts:
I know where she lives on the south-side of town. I live in the north. During best-traffic-times (late at night) when you can zip through the city quickly - she is still about a 1/2hr drive away. I could imagine that distance on bicycle and doing it in about 2 to 2 1/2hrs (I have done that ride from another section of the city) and would not even consider walking that - it would be an all-day thing.
 

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Daily trips to the store...

I know several people who think nothing of a daily trip to Walmart, dining out every night, or having absolutely no canned goods in their pantry.

One friend just went through a blizzard in Wisconsin, then proclaimed on Christmas Eve she had to go out to the store because she had nothing in the house for a decent meal, much less the next day's holiday meals.

I offered to buy a relative groceries a few months ago (during some 'tough times'). She laughed and said, "I don't cook." :scratch She buys deli items daily at the store, or dines out with friends. And somehow, I'm the weird one...:dunno:

The article is, I think, a realistic view of mainstream people becoming a bit more aware of the responsibility we each have for our own survival. I got a very positive vibe from the article, hopefully more people will read this and start thinking about preparedness.
 

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I know several people who think nothing of a daily trip to Walmart, dining out every night, or having absolutely no canned goods in their pantry.

One friend just went through a blizzard in Wisconsin, then proclaimed on Christmas Eve she had to go out to the store because she had nothing in the house for a decent meal, much less the next day's holiday meals.

I offered to buy a relative groceries a few months ago (during some 'tough times'). She laughed and said, "I don't cook." :scratch She buys deli items daily at the store, or dines out with friends. And somehow, I'm the weird one...:dunno:

The article is, I think, a realistic view of mainstream people becoming a bit more aware of the responsibility we each have for our own survival. I got a very positive vibe from the article, hopefully more people will read this and start thinking about preparedness.
I hope your right about that, but that monster apathy will always rear its ugly head.
 

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I am a little teapot
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I've known people who brag that they don't ever cook. I like to go out to eat once in a while, but not very often. For us it's a treat. We don't have as much stocked up yet as a lot of you folks but we''re doing what we can and headed in the right direction. As I get more into this thing I become more and more aware of how pathetically unprepared most people are. It's mind boggling and people ignoring their own food and its stability is the epitome of lethatgic, stupid SHEEPLE.
 

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I've known people who brag that they don't ever cook. I like to go out to eat once in a while, but not very often. For us it's a treat. We don't have as much stocked up yet as a lot of you folks but we''re doing what we can and headed in the right direction. As I get more into this thing I become more and more aware of how pathetically unprepared most people are. It's mind boggling and people ignoring their own food and its stability is the epitome of lethatgic, stupid SHEEPLE.
I wonder how many sheeple live pay-cheque to pay-cheque and have no money stashed through investments, RRSPs, TaxFree accounts or in hard valuable minerals like gold, silver, etc.
 

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Probably more than a few. My grandfather, a lifelong dairy farmer, once told me "it's not how much you make that matters-it's how much you save."
 
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