Powdered Eggs

Discussion in 'General Food and Foraging Discussion' started by Carol&Steve, Nov 18, 2008.

  1. Carol&Steve

    Carol&Steve Member

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    Anyone ever given powdered eggs a whirl? How we're they?

    I'm looking into buying just a few cans as I have chickens who supply most of my eggs. Gonna get a few cans of powdered eggs for the survival kit though.

    Well, that is, only if you guys say they pretty good....
     
  2. Ted Lurch

    Ted Lurch New Member

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    Why not try them yourself ?
     

  3. dunappy

    dunappy Well-Known Member

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    haven't tried them myself, but I also have chickens and eggs. I just keep buying more laying hens. But you know that you can freeze AND dehydrate your own eggs.

     
  4. Avarice

    Avarice Member

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    I understand that most of you have chickens and stuff but if you were in a bug uot situation, you can't load up your chickens and haul them out sticks with you. Where would you keep them contained? Certainly not in your tent or car. Powdered eggs would be great for this event. I haven't tried them yet and I am betting they aren't as good as a fresh egg, but they will certainly do in the instance!
     
  5. dunappy

    dunappy Well-Known Member

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    Well that is why you live in a non-bugout area.

    There is very little here that I would have to " bug out" from. There are no hurricanes, No tornados, No floods, and if there was a wildfire, my property would be saved due to my preparations. The only things I'd have to "bug out" for would be a massive volcanic eruption (yellowstone super volcano sized).

    And If we had " advanced warning" of any type, we could still haul many of the chickens along in the horse trailer with the horses. I'm not leaveing without the horses and that leaves a portion of the horse trailer to also haul chickens in.

     
  6. blake0808

    blake0808 New Member

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    I started using powdered eggs several months ago and have had great success. I just love them. They are both economical and very easy to use. I also like that you can use whole eggs, or use egg whites and not have to waste the yolks as directed in some recipes. They are very economical: coming out to between 19 and 15 cents each egg, depending on the size you buy. I use them in baking mostly, and that leaves my fresh eggs to use for eating fresh.

    I definitely suggest anyone give them a try. You can buy them in small 2.5 cans if you don't want to invest too much. They are good in the fridge for over a year once opened, and many more than that sealed in cans on the shelf.

    Good Luck!!
     
  7. rainbowgardens

    rainbowgardens Well-Known Member

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    I prefer to invest in fresh foods for optimum nutritional content, but I can see the wisdom in storing some dried forms of dairy products for emergencies. I recently stocked some powdered milk and buttermilk. I have been debating the eggs. We have our own hens, but what if they were stolen or we had to eat them? We can't have a roo, so we would be dependant on a hatchery for replacements. Without eggs our baking choices would be very limited.
    I just hate the thought of spending money on something that we wouldn't use in our normal food rotation. It would be a waste, but also a form of security.
    I'm still thinking on this one.
     
  8. endurance

    endurance Well-Known Member

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    I've had dehydrated eggs since I started backpacking years ago. The key I remembered to preparing them is to start cooking with them pretty watery. If you start to dry, you end up with something that resembles a rubber superball you played with as a kid. Not too edible. Otherwise, as noted, they're great to have around for baking when you don't have any fresh ones around and can make a pretty decent scrambled egg, too. I haven't tried making french toast with them yet, but it's on my list of things to try.
     
  9. j1963herr

    j1963herr New Member

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    I've had them many times. Some you have to reconstitute with milk, others with water. They pass as eggs as far as texture and almost as eggs in looks if you're preparing them scrambled. They taste a little on the sweet side (at least the two types I've had), but they work much better in recipes. If you've never eaten military rations, then you might be a little disappointed with these. However, in a bind their protein content is what you should be most interested in. They have the same protein content as real eggs. They are not as good as Eggbeaters from the dairy section of your local supermarket, but they pass.
     
  10. Country Living

    Country Living Supporting Member

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    I hate to resurrect an old thread.... Has anyone found dried / powered eggs they like? I bought some and either I'm rehydrated-challenged or there is some trick I just can't figure out.

    Suggestions?
     
  11. Expeditioner

    Expeditioner Well-Known Member

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    The ones from Honeyville Grain or Shelf Reliance are not bad!!!!
     
  12. Country Living

    Country Living Supporting Member

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    I've got the ones from Honeyville. Do you follow the instructions to reconstitute them or do you have some other way that works for you? I just can't get the texture right.
     
  13. bunkerbob

    bunkerbob Supporting Member

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    I think the real importance of freeze dried or dehydrated eggs have been missed here. While they might not be the best tasting long term storage item, they are going to fill in a need for variety in your diet when they become either scarce or non-existent. They can be used in or with other dishes, french toast maybe?,YUM,:2thumb: and of course in baking, like egg bread just to mention a few. Lets see, go hungry, or maybe eat eggs that don't taste like the real McCoy. Not much you can use to substitute for these, somethings, but not a lot.
     
  14. Country Living

    Country Living Supporting Member

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    I realize that - I just can't reconstitute the dried eggs in such a way they even resemble eggs. I followed the directions on the can to make scrambled eggs and they turn out looking like fried mustard. Is there a secret way to reconstitute them? I've added more water. I've added milk. I've added more milk.

    I am reasonably sure some of the cruise ships use powered eggs. I like their eggs. I don't know how to replicate the process. That's why I thought maybe I was buying the wrong eggs.

    On a happier note - I did manage to freeze eggs yesterday. Somewhere in my excitement (about learning eggs can be frozen) I skipped over the part about spraying the muffin tin. That won't happen again. I have six little frozen eggs in the freezer. One of them will go in cornbread later this week.
     
  15. bunkerbob

    bunkerbob Supporting Member

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    I'm going to look into the best way to reconstitute powdered eggs, we had them in the military and I thought that while they didn't taste like fresh, they weren't bad. By the way I found this for making your own dry egg powder...The Incredible, Edible DRIED EGG!!
     
  16. Country Living

    Country Living Supporting Member

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    Thanks, BB. I'm starting to feel I'm rehydrated-challenged. :cry:
     
  17. Country Living

    Country Living Supporting Member

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    I tried the "Heavenly Scrambled Eggs" from the website. My eggs went from looking like fried mustard to throw-up (my apologies if any of you have not yet had breakfast!) The taste still leaves a lot to be desired. I used butter instead of butter buds - not sure it would make that much of a difference.

    The challenge continues.
     
  18. kyfarmer

    kyfarmer Well-Known Member

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    While not really full egg tasting, they were not bad. We have eaten them on fishing trip's and even in deer camp once i used them instead of real one's, no one knew them from the other. But they might have been really hungry to. ;)
     
  19. TechAdmin

    TechAdmin Administrator Staff Member

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    Did you fry the powdered eggs in butter?
    The fat content in butter dissallows for the protein of the eggs to bind to other egg proteins by attaching the protein to a fat source (like a roux minus the carbohydrate to absoarb surrounding moisture). Did you get little clumps? That's where the egg proteins bound together before the fat could isolate them.
    If you did add the butter after. I'm sorry. That sucks.
     
  20. Tribal Warlord Thug

    Tribal Warlord Thug Well-Known Member

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    just wondering if anybody has ever tried to use the 'egg beaters' to dehydrate......just a thought.....save you the trouble of using your fresh eggs that way too.