Pole built homes

Discussion in 'General Homesteading & Building' started by Jimmy24, May 29, 2011.

  1. Jimmy24

    Jimmy24 Member

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  2. Centraltn

    Centraltn Well-Known Member

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    Yep- love em and they are a lil more affordable.. altho- now a days, cement, in some, cases is cheaper than wood!
     

  3. Jimmy24

    Jimmy24 Member

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    Not around here....wood is the cheapest material. Some forms of it are high, but always have been. 7/16 osb was 21 a sheet just 3 years ago...6.99 now..

    Concrete is 85 a yard...friend of mine has big home, well big to me, 3200 sqft. $40k just in his slab!!!!!:eek::eek:

    I can build two NICE 30x40 pole cabins for the price of his slab....:eek:

    I actually love the simplicity and strength of them more than anything.

    Great homestead building IMHO.

    Jimmy
     
  4. Clarice

    Clarice Well-Known Member

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    Poured the slab for our screen room last week $112/yd.
     
  5. Jimmy24

    Jimmy24 Member

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    That's what I'm saying...good gosh!! :gaah:

    Jimmy
     
  6. FunnyFarm

    FunnyFarm Member

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    A 24x24 concrete pad 4" thick has a cost of around $800. Framing a 24x24 using 2x8's built up on posts would actually be more costly coming in around $1000 . That price wouldn't include any insulation so in reality would be even higher. I think both types of construction have there place depending on what your building... can a concrete truck get to the location... use of building etc...
     
  7. BlueShoe

    BlueShoe ExCommunicated

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    That's assuming that the sight is ready to pour a concrete pad. I think the savings is in the site prep of some areas. In areas of Tx you have to truck out the poor soil and bring in several feet of good, compactable (sp) soil just to get ready for build.

    The construction method isn't common where I am, but you see it in coastal areas. Some areas are also protected and require more .gov red tape which means more money for oversight.

    Pole/pier construction was the method I considered to use for a property I have. I have a couple of acres of multi-family zoned land that I wanted to develop which floods due to a lake that's two blocks away. It's on a creek and will flood when it really rains. The lake prevents natural water runoff.

    If I didn't use that method, I'd have to prep and pour footers then build it up with block or concrete (11'-12') to a level where it was 1' above flood stage as described by the Corps of Engineers. No idea what it costs to get wood poles rammed in the ground to the required depth. It ought to be way faster than normal construction, though.

    ETA: I see the diff in pier and pole construction. In pier the poles stop at the sub floor and you build a conventional house on that style of footing. In pole built they extend to the roof and hold up the entire structure. The walls are load bearing. You can really open the floor plan easier that way.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2011
  8. Gravlore

    Gravlore Old soul

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    Our home is a pole building. Love it and it is easy on the pocket book. 1600 sq' and its about 90% done. No concrete anywhere. Only need a wood furnace and passive solar room. Cost so far is about 40K. Neighbors traditional 1400sq' with basement is coming in at $320K. Labor is stupid high here right now, plumbers are getting $100-$150 an hour.

    Most of all, we wanted to build a home that would be hard to sell (non traditional) so the land would be easily passed on to future generations without the temptation to sell for a quick buck.
     
  9. cnsper

    cnsper Well-Known Member

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    Another name for it is pier and beam construction. I do prefer to pour concrete in the holes and then mount the piers to the concrete bases. Treated or not, the wood will eventually rot so it is better to have it all above ground and concrete below ground.
     
  10. Gravlore

    Gravlore Old soul

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    How does wood rot if the soil is dry? We have poly skirting with dirt over that and the berm is 2' high, extended 8' away from the perimeter. Wood basements in our area have been around for some 50+ years without signs of rotting. I am working on a well and am pulled up dry sand till 22'. Will wood rot without moisture?
     
  11. Transplant

    Transplant Newbie

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  12. cnsper

    cnsper Well-Known Member

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    Nope but then you also have a unique situation. That is not the case in most of the country. Berms do not stop water they only channel what is on top of the ground.
     
  13. LincTex

    LincTex Jack of all trades?

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    I think this gives you a more stable base with less money. Poles that size are expensive. With wooden poles going into the ground, make darn sure your local govt and insurance company are cool with it if you plan to use old utility poles!
     
  14. Will01

    Will01 New Member

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    Wooden Homes , Asphalt Roofs... these are indefensible structures and would be worse than useless in any serious crisis..

    Bad guys would simply give you the option of surrendering your supplies or they would burn you out (Which after giving them some or all of your supplies they might just do anyway).

    Mud, Adobe, Concrete, Steel Structures with thick steel doors deep set frames for windows etc, these are really the only option for "Bugging In".
     
  15. cowboyhermit

    cowboyhermit Supporting Member

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    Will01, that is far too narrow a view, I don't recommend a wooden house with asphalt roof but to say that they are worse than useless is shortsighted.
    There are many ways to make homes more resistant to fire such as treatments, sprinklers on the peak and eaves, foam, and on and on.
    But this is predicated on the fact that the bad guys were allowed to get anywhere near the house to begin with. If you think you will be safe in any kind of structure including a concrete bunker once you are overrun you are dreaming.