Pic of fuel preps

Discussion in 'Energy & Electricity' started by 10101, Apr 18, 2009.

  1. 10101

    10101 Guest

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    45 gallons of unleaded gasoline 87 octane 10% ethanol (because I cant seem to find regular gasoline, every station has this crap![​IMG]), with healthy dose of stabil, and 20 gallons of propane. The ten gallons worth of plastic cans are empty, thought I would include them as special effects.


    [​IMG]

    I got most of these fuel cans locally (flea market and craigslist between $9-16 each) some of the NATO fuel cans were purchased from colemans.com and cheaperthandirt.com ($15 from sites....plus shipping)

    All the 20# propane tanks were purchased off craigslist (bought seperate, paid $5-9 each some were half full of propane![​IMG])

    I have repainted (sanded then spray painted) most of them red and used a homemade stencil for the lettering.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2009
  2. RWB214

    RWB214 Member

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    How do you plan to rotate the stock?
     

  3. Canadian

    Canadian Well-Known Member

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    What's your storage situation?
     
  4. northernontario

    northernontario Well-Known Member

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    This is definitely an important question. It does no good to buy 45 gallons of gas and then let it sit for a year. It needs to be cycled out regularly to maintain freshness.
     
  5. 10101

    10101 Guest

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    See this: http://www.preparedsociety.com/forum/f16/fuel-prep-storage-container-1257/

    Stored in backyard away from house.

    Every year I rotate fuel into my truck with the use of a super siphon, keep in mind that this is the normal rotation schedule, during an active hurricane season, the fuel is used up in no time in the generator.

    [​IMG]

    During hurricane Wilma in 2005 we used nearly 30 gallons of fuel in the generator as we did not have power for nearly two weeks when I lived in south Florida.

    The propane is used on my grill and travel trailer, propane is good forever, its the containers that fail (or need to be re-certified.)
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2009
  6. Canadian

    Canadian Well-Known Member

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    I need to get a siphon so I can refuel from other vehicles in emergency situations.
     
  7. northernontario

    northernontario Well-Known Member

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    Generally speaking... you can't. ;)

    Most cars have some sort of ball or float valve somewhere in the fill line. It's as simple as a round sealing surface, and a plastic ping-pong ball. The idea is, if the car rolls over, the ball seats in the sealing surface, and fuel doesn't leak out (very quickly anyways). It also does a great job of preventing siphoning. Trust me, I've tried it on a couple cars I've owned at one time or another to remove old gas. You will have a hell of a time getting just a piece of hose down into the tank, let alone trying to fit one with that siphon starter in there.

    Much easier to find a primary fuel line (assuming the main pump isn't in the tank... which it is on most cars nowadays), cut the main line, and drain that way.

    Even easier than that... screwdriver (you really should use a brass punch for this... brass = no sparks when struck against steel) through the bottom of a tank, wide pan (like an oil drain pan) to catch the fuel.

    If you know the vehicles you're planning on siphoning from, you may be able to teach yourself ahead of time how to drain the fuel out. On my older Audi's and VW's, this can be accomplished by removing the fuel feed line in the engine bay, running that line with some hose into a gas tank, then putting a jumper on the fuel pump so that the pump runs constantly until the tank is dry.

    But... that takes time, experience with the vehicle, and access to the engine bay and relay panel. Sometimes it's just easier to punch a hole in the tank. Or if your tank is gravity feed to an external pump... pulling the main line off the fuel pump and gravity-draining the tank.
     
  8. Viking

    Viking Well-Known Member

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    Sta-Bil seems to work pretty good. I have had fuel stored for three years that didn't have a bit of varnish smell to it and when I've used it on a few engines that were a little hard to start, it ran very good. Generally I try to refresh fuel by using the oldest. If you want alcohol free fuel, racing fuel is available at some bulk suppliers. I have a friend that buys this kind of fuel for his older outboard Mercury and some people use it in chain saws, also small airports have it but usually they are more expensive.
     
  9. youpock

    youpock Well-Known Member

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    "Don't swallow harmful liquids"