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YourAdministrator, eh?
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http://ca.reuters.com/article/domesticNews/idCAKCN0QW28P20150827

Canadians spend more on taxes than bare necessities: study

OTTAWA (Reuters) - Canadians spend more on taxes than on food, clothing and shelter combined, according to a report released on Thursday, as increases in an average family's tax bill have outpaced the cost of basic necessities in the last five decades.

Last year, the average family made C$79,010 ($59,607.70), of which C$33,272 went to taxes and C$28,887 went to food, clothing and shelter, said the study from public policy think tank the Fraser Institute, which calls itself non-partisan.

That means Canadians spent 42.1 percent of their income on taxes and 36.6 percent on basic needs. By contrast, 33.5 percent of an average family's income went to taxes and 56.5 percent was spent on necessities in 1961.

"Over the past five decades, the tax bill for the average Canadian family has ballooned," Charles Lammam, co-author of the study, said in a statement.

Indeed, taxes have taken up a greater percentage of income than basic necessities for most of the years since the early 1980s, according to the report.

The increase in total taxes since 1961 has outstripped rises in the cost of food, shelter and clothing. Accounting for inflation, taxes were still up 149.2 percent since then, the report said.

The Fraser Institute's tax index reflects both the "visible and hidden" taxes that Canadians pay to all levels of government, including income, property and other taxes.

A recent report from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development found the average income tax rate in Canada was 15.6 percent, in line with the OECD average and slightly lower than the United States' 17.2 percent.

With an election in Canada less than two months away and an economy that is struggling with the slide in oil prices, the study prompted questions for politicians on the campaign trail.

"This is exactly why it is critical in this country we keep a national government dedicated to keeping taxes down," Conservative Prime Minister Stephen Harper told reporters.

Harper, who is running for a rare fourth consecutive term in office, has maintained Canada should stick with the Conservative plan of balanced budgets and low taxes.

(Reporting by Leah Schnurr; Editing by Lisa Von Ahn)
... and I wonder why I can't save any money anymore ... :help:
 

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Texan
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5,950 Posts
By the time you figure in all taxes from all steps in manufacture and sale and distribution of a good, it's likely a lot more than that, at least down here south of your border.

Most people dont realize just how much of their money goes to taxes of one kind or another.
 

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NewGuy
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6 Posts
How's that national healthcare working for you, eh?
Actually thanks to things like our health care system Canadians live longer then Americans.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_life_expectancy

Also there is the freedom ranking where Canada ranked 6th in the list verses 20th for America. Heck even Chile, a third world country, ranks higher in personal freedom.

http://object.cato.org/sites/cato.org/files/human-freedom-index-files/human-freedom-index-2015.pdf
 

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NewGuy
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Registered
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4,575 Posts
Actually thanks to things like our health care system Canadians live longer then Americans.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_life_expectancy

Also there is the freedom ranking where Canada ranked 6th in the list verses 20th for America. Heck even Chile, a third world country, ranks higher in personal freedom.

http://object.cato.org/sites/cato.org/files/human-freedom-index-files/human-freedom-index-2015.pdf
So what? Canada is becoming more and more of a politically correct police state as time goes on. Kind of like having a liberal university run the whole country. You have less freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and freedom to own guns than America has.
 

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Premium Member
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3,583 Posts
Let's just turn this thread in a regional section into a debate about the merits of two different countries. Yes, America is perfect and free compared to all other countries, there are essentially no problems with erosion of freedoms in the U.S.

And yes, keep telling yourself that most Canadians would rather have Obamacare or your insurance based system, ignore all evidence to the contrary.

ETA; I do actually wonder sometimes if "average" Americans have any idea of how their tax burden compares with similar countries. You do realize, that despite the fact that we have inherently higher infrastructure costs per capita due to population density and geography, a long history (in the past) of leftist governments, and many other factors. We still only pay perhaps a couple percent more on taxes and as a result have the vast majority of our health care paid for while Americans pay many more percentage points on top of their tax burden.

In simpler terms if you combine American health care costs with American tax burden it is among the highest in the world.
 

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RockyMountainCanadian
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4,288 Posts
well one freedom Canadians enjoy is not getting arrested if there taxes are filed late.

I haven't seen a system of health care that works, mostly because most of the "providers" have no idea about health, just profit and drugs. :scratch
 

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Premium Member
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1,616 Posts
For you Canadians - I know nothing about your tax system. Do you have an income tax? If so, is it progressive or flat? I'm assuming you also have sales tax and property taxes.

Do you know if there are any major differences between your tax system and the U.S? In the U.S., not all states have a state income tax. Is that the same with your provinces and territories - they have a choice?
 

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Premium Member
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3,583 Posts
For you Canadians - I know nothing about your tax system. Do you have an income tax? If so, is it progressive or flat? I'm assuming you also have sales tax and property taxes.

Do you know if there are any major differences between your tax system and the U.S? In the U.S., not all states have a state income tax. Is that the same with your provinces and territories - they have a choice?
Like in the US, it's complicated, there is a federal sales tax on many things, refundable for business and low income. Then of course federal income tax like anywhere else. Alberta has no provincial sales tax and has had a flat income tax, other provinces are much different.

When you look at the tax burden compared to US and other developed countries it surprisingly isn't that bad, especially when health care and geography are factored in.

If you look at just basic numbers;
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_tax_revenue_as_percentage_of_GDP

As % of GDP, US is around 27%, Canada is around 32%.

ETA; US spending on healthcare is around 17% GDP and Canada is around 11% approximately, depending on the source. In case anyone is wondering what ballpark the numbers are in.

Now, this is coming from essentially a Libertarian who is ethically opposed to most taxes and government programs.
 

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Cowboy
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3,568 Posts
well one freedom Canadians enjoy is not getting arrested if there taxes are filed late....
Evidently the option of not paying your taxes is available in the States too.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/11/19/politics/al-sharpton-finance/index.html

(CNN)Civil rights leader Al Sharpton sharply denounced an extensive New York Times report that he and his companies are subject to $4.5 million in current state and federal tax liens.

The MSNBC host said in a press conference Wednesday that the $4.5 million was the original figure he was ordered to pay back in 2008, but that he has been making regular payments since then and the amount is now less.

Sharpton did not give the outstanding balance owed by him and his for-profit companies --Raw Talent and Revals Communications.

Rather, he focused his remarks on how much money his nonprofit group, the National Action Network, has paid back. The liens against that organization, however, were not lumped into the $4.5 million figure reported by the Times.

The Times reported that Sharpton is still liable for personal federal tax liens of more than $3 million, and state tax liens of $777,657. The companies owe another $717,329 on state and federal tax liens.

But Sharpton argued that it wasn't possible that he still owed $4.5 million.

"If we owed $4.5 million in '08 then how could we owe this now, unless you're saying that everybody just went to sleep on this and just gave us a pass, which is ridiculous," he said.

Sharpton has been a regular face in New York and Washington political circles. The report points out that President Barack Obama has raised money for Sharpton's group, and that Sharpton attended the recent announcement that Loretta Lynch would be the White House's pick to be the next Attorney General.

Sharpton's former aide Rachel Noerdlinger is also adviser to the wife of New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, Chirlane McCray.

Sharpton argued that he and the National Action Network could feasibly each pay off their respective balances in one day, but could not yet afford to pay the penalties and interest.

Still, he said, it is "absolutely inaccurate" that he and his organization collectively owe $4.5 million--which is how much the Times said that he and his for-profit businesses owe.
 
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