Office Desk Prep Kit

Discussion in 'Equipment & Survival Kits' started by GatorDude, Jan 11, 2010.

  1. GatorDude

    GatorDude Well-Known Member

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    I've been putting together a small emergency kit for my desk. Fortunately, I live and work for a rather low risk enterprise with a fairly decent stockpile of emergency equipment--First Aid, AED, Bottled Water, Emergency Generators, etc.

    However, here is some of my thinking for a kit so far:
    An Office Workers Guide to Making a Disaster Kit
     
  2. Jerry D Young

    Jerry D Young Well-Known Member

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    Some thoughts I came up with when one of my sisters was an executive and worked in a highrise.

    Executive briefcase kit

    cell phone
    cell phone windup charger or AA battery adapter
    light sticks
    whistle
    crank flashlight
    water packets
    dust mask
    surgical gloves
    light leather gloves
    antiseptic wipes
    water purification straw
    folding cups
    water bag
    water purification tablets
    moist towellettes
    change of underwear
    hygiene needs
    credit card
    phone card
    phone list
    personal ID
    company ID
    cash packet
    coin packet
    can/bottle opener
    knife
    spoon
    chopsticks
    spare medications
    spare glasses
    spare keys



    High-rise office building kit

    cell phone
    cell phone windup charger or AA battery adapter
    small back pack (allows use of hands & still keep everything together)
    Tyvek jump suit (to cover office apparel)
    boots/high top athletic shoes (to replace office shoes)
    cap/bumper cap (to protect head/keep long hair confined)
    dust mask/respirator w/CBRN filters (to protect from concrete dust/some smoke)(CBRN threats)
    safety glasses/goggles(or full face respirator) (to protect eyes from dust/debris from forcing doors, etc)
    smoke escape mask/hood (to give you time to get out when there is heavy smoke)
    light leather gloves (to handle tools/protect from abrasions)
    insulating underwear (winter use if heat fails)
    rappelling bag w/shoulder strap & equipment (used to rappel outside or down elevator shafts)
    escape parachute (if in a very high building a few broken bones is better than burning)
    Quality windup flashlight
    canteen/water packets (minimum supply if trapped)
    Millennium Food Bars or lifeboat rations (minimum food supply, not thirst causing)
    light sticks (to mark paths/provide additional light)
    Whistle (to signal location)
    alcohol antiseptic wipes (to clean minor scrapes & cuts/forehead cooling)
    water purification bottle w/MP-1 tablets (allows use of potentially contaminated water)
    folding cups (allows use of in-house water dispensers)
    moist towellettes (to clean dust from eyes & nose, etc)
    coin packet/phone card (allows access to in-house vending machines/pay phones)
    can/bottle opener (allows access to any available food containers)
    knife, spoon, & chopsticks (allows eating any available food)
    glass cutter (highrise building glass is hard to break scoring it with the glass cutter makes it easier)
    field knife (for general cutting purposes)
    Swiss Army Knife/Multi-tool (more cutting tools, screwdrivers, pliers, etc, to get into things)
    pry bar (to open elevator doors, windows, locked doors)
    elevator key (to access & safely control elevators)
    building specific special tools (special window washing track climbers)
    change of underwear
    hygiene needs
    personal ID
    company ID
    cash packet
    spare medications
    spare glasses
    spare keys
    heavy duty options
    bolt cutters
    sledge hammer
    hydraulic jack/porta power

    For bugging-in add additional food, additional water, a windup radio/flashlight w/coil of wire for better antenna, sleeping bag & pad, more sanitation items, sheet plastic, and duct tape.
     

  3. sailaway

    sailaway Well-Known Member

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    Great list Jerry, I have my office prepped to either keep me there for a couple of days, get me home or get me out of town. I definately feel safe there.
     
  4. GatorDude

    GatorDude Well-Known Member

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    I really like your executive briefcase kit. You've got some good ideas in there that could executed in a low profile way. However, I'm thinking that some of the gear in the high-rise kit wouldn't fly too well. The parachute, rappeling gear, and a hydraulic jack would probably raise a few eyebrows with security on the way in. :dunno: However, I think the gas mask is probably a great idea for people in urban target areas or in industrial areas where chemical spills/fires are likely.
     
  5. Vertigo

    Vertigo Member

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    If you would like to have some ideas for that, there is a guy on youtube who makes some pretty decent videos. Usually reviews of guns/knives/gear. But he also does some philosophical videos, gun running and such. His latest project was three 45min+ videos (part 1,2,3) where he talks about a USK (Urban Survival Kit) to preposition at your office or in your car.

    It's very informative, I have been following his reviews for a year now and he really knows his stuff. As far as cred's go, for what it is worth, he has 55000 subscribers.

    His alias is "Nutnfancy", if you would like to check him out, here is his youtube account: nutnfancy

    And here is the link to his USK series:



    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OVkntkChnnM"]USK part 1[/ame]


    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GOC901gcLng"]USK part 2[/ame]


    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YeNVsc3vvi4"]USK part 3[/ame]



    Hope you enjoy, I always love watching his vids.

    V.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2010
  6. sailaway

    sailaway Well-Known Member

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    Vertigo, Nutnfancy is great, thanks for the recomendation! I'm a new subscriber. Sailaway
     
  7. Vertigo

    Vertigo Member

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    You're welcome :)
     
  8. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    I might have to take a picture of my office-preps. Very simply, I have under my desk a large plastic tool-box filled with a couple weeks of food / supplies. I purchased the toolbox from CanadianTire for about $15 and it is about 30" long overall. In the bottom of the box I have packs of instant-soups, instant-noodles, oatmeal porridge, granola and food-prep-items. On the top removable tray I have chocolates, candies, more oatmeal porridge, more granola and other dried "quick-to-eat" foods.

    I have a desk-drawer setup with cutlery, a can-opener, a bottle opener, bottled water (refilled many times from the brita-filtered-water from the sink) and in the fridge at work I also have a Brita water-filtered water-jug, condiments and several more bottles of refilled water. In my shop, I have a large BBQ (propane) and, because I do not use a microwave (at home or at work), all the cooking that I need to do is done naturally. I plan to put a single-burner stove into my Jeep to be there at all times - just so that if the power goes out and I need to stay at work, I can get the stove and cook that way.
     
  9. sailaway

    sailaway Well-Known Member

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    Naekid, Your office sounds like mine with preps, food stores all around me. I can pack lite and head for home or can round up family and head out. I also keep alot of tools here, one way we rotate stock is to give it to the homeless kitchen. What kind of grill will you ghet for your Jeep, an electric hot plate or are you thinking backpackers stove? Do you have an inverter in your Jeep? Why don't you use a microwave? I use mine at work all the time.
     
  10. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    I have been looking at the MSR WhisperLite series of stoves. Fairly reasonable in price and very portable. It is small enough to hide in the saddle-bags in my Jeep and to take backpack-camping. My father has several mini-stoves that he uses when he does bicycle-treks and motorcycle-touring. I also have the standard portable large 2-burner propane stove at home for camping and backyard cooking.

    I have "showed-off" my tool-box/lunch-box to a couple of co-workers and they loved the idea so much that they did something similar. I explained to them it was just so that when I packed my food in the morning that I only need to remember to pack the "fresh-food" only, all the dried / canned stuff stays at work.

    Back in the late '80s I weaned myself off of using microwave for cooking / re-heating - thinking that natural-cooked foods would be a way better choice for my body. I have not missed the microwave at all and I have convinced all my MSO's since then to give up on microwaves. As I am moving my life to a simpler living style, I am getting rid of many electrical appliances and going back to the "old-fashioned" way of doing things. Right now, I would estimate 90% of my baking / cooking is done with manual appliances and fire instead of electricity.

    I will bake in my BBQ instead of in my electric-oven whenever possible. I don't bother using electric mixers, choosing to use a stainless bowl and a fork. I grind up herbs / spices in my very large granite mortar/pestle (picture of it below). Only when I have no choice in the matter will I use electricity, but, again, it is very minimal.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    My office is a Ford F700. :D
     
  12. sailaway

    sailaway Well-Known Member

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    Definately carry a shotgun, you never know when a deer, turkey or phesant might come your way. Wouldn't hurt to carry some warm winter stuff for being stranded in snow. Sleeping bag, couple cans of food, small backpack stove, hat, gloves, maybe a CB Radio. Stuff like that.
     
  13. sarahdally

    sarahdally New Member

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    office kits

    Hey, this is great. Works for a paranoid OCD-stricken person like me.