NEW, the most efficient solar energy ever!

Discussion in 'Energy & Electricity' started by Big B, Dec 11, 2008.

  1. Big B

    Big B Well-Known Member

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    Found this today, wow, here is a way to solve the oil crisis.
    Can you see this used in a residential or remote application??
    Any other application ideas?

    Solar power breakthroughs SUNRGI 7 cents per kwh 2009 and Israel Solar Power 100 times lower cost
    SUNRGI's "concentrated photovoltaic" system relies on lenses to magnify sunlight 2,000 times, letting it produce as much electricity as standard panels with a far smaller system. They say they'll start producing solar panels by mid-2009 that will generate electricity for about 7 cents a kilowatt hour, including installation.


    In terms of Scott Adams idea that Israel with 100 times cheaper solar power could break the Middle East oil stranglehold. The Israeli government announced its support for a broad effort to promote the use of electric cars, embracing a joint venture between an American-Israeli entrepreneur and Renault, of France, and its partner, Nissan Motor, of Japan. The idea, said Shai Agassi, 39, the software entrepreneur behind the new company, is to sell electric car transportation on the model of the cellphone. Purchasers get subsidized hardware - the car - and pay a monthly fee for expected mileage, like minutes on a cellphone plan, eliminating concerns about the fluctuating price of gasoline.

    Part of the global effort is the development of ultrabattery (cheaper, higher performance, longer lasting battery/supercapacitor combinations.

    Solar panels generate electricity when photons in sunlight knock loose electrons in silicon or another semiconductor. Other concentrated photovoltaic makers magnify sunlight about 500 times. SUNRGI says it can multiply that by four because it has a system to instantly cool its germanium-based semiconductor from 3,300 degrees to 20 degrees above ambient temperature. High temperatures can melt a solar cell.

    Also pushing down costs are a highly efficient semiconductor that converts 37% of the sunlight to electricity, more than double the industry average. The unit's compact size allows it to be made at electronics or PC factories, avoiding the need to build new plants.
     
  2. northernontario

    northernontario Well-Known Member

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    Yes, this would be great for residential or remote applications. The problem with photovoltaics is that, when magnifying sun rays, you heat up the panel. Like they say... heating = melting = dead panels.

    If you are limited by space to put up panels (residential area... limited roof space), then a panel that can produce 4x the energy is a fantastic idea. And, even better if the systems can be combined...

    How are they cooling the panels? Perhaps they have found a way to cool with water... which would mean a panel could be used to provide electrical energy to a battery bank, and heat energy to a hot water storage system ... potable hot water, in-floor heating, a 'dump load' of tubes layed through a driveway and concrete steps to melt ice and snow.

    There is great potential for this technology.
     

  3. Big B

    Big B Well-Known Member

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    Dtom
    You missed the second to the last paragraph above my friend.

    Solar panels generate electricity when photons in sunlight knock loose electrons in silicon or another semiconductor. Other concentrated photovoltaic makers magnify sunlight about 500 times. SUNRGI says it can multiply that by four because it has a system to instantly cool its germanium-based semiconductor from 3,300 degrees to 20 degrees above ambient temperature. High temperatures can melt a solar cell.
     
  4. northernontario

    northernontario Well-Known Member

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    I didn't miss the 2nd to last paragraph... that's the paragraph I'm referring to when I talk about a system to gather both electrical energy and heat energy. Obviously they've found a way to cool their cells... so what are they doing with the heat? I am assuming they have developed a system to cool the panels with water (or some sort of circuilating coolant) which could be used to transfer heat to an alternate location, like a big air-cooled heat sink... or a hot water heater... or a home heating system... etc.

    I didn't miss-read the article... I'm curious what they're doing with all the extra heat.