Neo-Survivalism prediction

Discussion in 'Politics' started by bunkerbob, Dec 20, 2009.

  1. bunkerbob

    bunkerbob Supporting Member

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    Just read this from another site, interesting perspective...

    Neo-Survivalism prediction from Gerald Celente

    Back in the Cold War days, survivalism meant building a bomb shelter and stocking it with enough food to outlast nuclear fallout.

    In the late 1970’s, with inflation soaring, Iran raging, and gold and oil prices skyrocketing, survival meant cashing out of paper money and heading for the hills with enough ammunition and pork & beans to wait out the economic and political storms.

    In 2000, the Y2K crowd – the most recent breed of survivalists – expecting computer clocks to crash, infrastructure to break down and the world to go dark, were armed and barricaded with enough food to feed an army and enough ammunition to hold one off.

    In 2010, survivalism will go mainstream. Unemployed or fearing it, foreclosed or nearing it, pensions lost and savings gone … all sorts of folk who once believed in the system, having witnessed its battering, have lost their faith.

    The realities of failing financial institutions, degrading infrastructure, manipulated marketplaces, soaring energy costs, widening wars, and terror consequences have created a new breed of survivalist. Motivated not by worst-case scenario fears but by do-or-die necessity, the new non-believers, unwilling to go under or live on the streets, will devise ingenious stratagems to beat the system, get off the grid (as much as possible), and stay under the radar.
     
  2. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    Stay off the radar - that sounds perfect to me!!!
     

  3. Vertigo

    Vertigo Member

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    Didn't that come from the trends institute journal? The Trends Research Institute® - Forecasting, Tracking and Analyzing Global Trends

    Whoever wrote it, I do see the tell tale signs that they might be right. Just look around to the people, a lot of them have begun changing their thinking towards how their parents or grandparents lived. They buy less niceties and more necessities...

    greetz,

    V.
     
  4. bunkerbob

    bunkerbob Supporting Member

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    You are correct, hope this will not continue to muddy up the perception of survivalism even more.
    Make sure we never lose sight of preparedness though, despite the sometimes vivid and negative portrayal of it.

    Note to Vertigo, no more music!!!:2thumb: thanks.
     
  5. Vertigo

    Vertigo Member

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    Well, in all honesty, I didn't think it was portrayed that negatively in the trends journal thingy. Not really positive either, just the facts.

    And thanks for the music :) I'll check it out right now!

    V.
     
  6. GatorDude

    GatorDude Well-Known Member

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    You know financial preps are quite a bit different than end of the world preps. I was unemployed for 5 months this year and lived in three states. If it were ever to happen again, I'd love to have all loans/cards paid off and have a lot more money in the bank. ;)
     
  7. sailaway

    sailaway Well-Known Member

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    I think BunkerBob's post is quite accurate. I am directly involved in the manufacturing sector and it continues to die off more and more as another product gets moved over seas for production. I truly believe you can't have a healthy construction sector with out mfg. here in the states. Both sectors are flat in Ohio. The medical industry will not be able to support itself with out any good paying jobs either, no one can afford insurance. Our only local hospital looses $1million/month, lack of customers who can pay. Look at Florida, not as many people can afford to vacation there. Instead of inflation, I've been wondering if things could deflate to a point where the person who flips burgers for $7/hr. can buy a house. That may be our new economy, with most citizens just surviving on the neccessities of life, the Gubbamint and the select few will not have any competition buying up all the goods and services, thus keeping a lid on inflation. :scratch Sail
     
  8. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    I bought my house at a time when housing prices had hit rock-bottom. Believe it or not, I just finished my schooling debt-free (paid-for by flipping burgers) and just barely started a job in the computer industry for just over minimum-wage.

    My house is now up for sale for a value of 2.7 times higher than what I paid for it ... (for those keeping track, that means that my next step to be grid-free is about to be taken).
     
  9. TheHammer

    TheHammer Member

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    pretty similar situation here, selling in a couple months while there's still buyers moving to a location with lower cost property and getting off grid.
     
  10. keepitlow

    keepitlow Well-Known Member

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    Seems to be many such trends chipping away at our very survival before the SHTF comes knocking at our door. So even if none of our SHTF scenarios come to fruition, living life itself can be a survival feat nowadays.