My "back up" water source. A Shallow Well installed by hand

Discussion in 'Water Filtering & Storage' started by nj_m715, Aug 13, 2010.

  1. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    Details are on my blog. I am on city water, so It may or may not be plumbed into my house :sssh:
    [​IMG]
     
  2. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    Nice! Our shallow well is our main source of water but to hand pump it, we need to go outside.
     

  3. Clarice

    Clarice Well-Known Member

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    We would like to convert our well to a hand pump. The well is approx. 125'. Can you give me some idea how to start. Do we need to remove the existing pipe and sand point? Any information you can share will be appreciated. We have community water now and would use this for a backup.
     
  4. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    Wells are considered shallow or deep. Normally under 25' is shallow and over that is deep. Pumps are much better at pushing than pulling. My well is made of 1.25" pipe and the pump is on the surface. 25' is as far as most pumps can pull water. Your well is most likely a larger pipe, maybe 6" or so and your pump is at the bottom of the well where it can push the water up. Our systems are very different.

    If your well is working fine right now your cheapest way for "back up" water is to have back up power. a small gen set or inverter can run your pump along with other important things like your fridge. There are manual deep pumps that run be powered by hand, bicycle, windmill etc. I don't have any first hand knowledge of them. I don't know if one can be added to your system or if it would have to completely replace your existing pump. I'm sure someone else here can fill you in or you can google it.
     
  5. Victor23

    Victor23 Well-Known Member

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    Go to your home depot or Lowes. They have a shallow well kit that works like the principle of sticking a water hose in the ground. You basically wash your pipe down to water bearing soil. I sunk my pipe down to 30 feet and put a hand pump on the pipe. I hit water at 20'. I can pump enough water to supply my daily needs. It is a very inexpensive way to ensure your survival with your own water supply.
     
  6. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    Yup, that's what is in my photo, but I also added a harbor freight pump to it. Only one of my local home depots had the sand point but I'm not in a rural area.
     
  7. PS360

    PS360 Well-Known Member

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    That wouldn't work here, too many rocks.
     
  8. sailaway

    sailaway Well-Known Member

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    I have 20% of the worlds fresh water in my back yard, the great lakes!:D
     
  9. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    Hand pumps will work on very deep wells but they are expensive to purchase. The difference between a hand pump for a deep well is that the actual "pump" is in the pipe going down the well and is connected to the handle by long rods. A shallow well pump has the "pump" on top just below the handle. If your well is a drilled well the pump and pipe will have to fit inside the well casing.

    DEEP WELL PUMP - Hand Pump Kit - eBay (item 220656045600 end time Nov-15-10 13:34:16 PST)

    Bison Deep Well Hand Water Pumps

    The Bison pump is a pressure pump (I think) meaning you can attach a hose to it and pump water through the hose.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2010
  10. sailaway

    sailaway Well-Known Member

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    Just talking to Josie Wales on the phone tonight, he is a member of this forum who lives in The Bronx. He is trying to come up with a secondary water source for when it all goes wrong in the City, any suggestions?
     
  11. The_Blob

    The_Blob performing monkey

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    rooftop cisterns?
     
  12. Ponce

    Ponce Well-Known Member

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    My water is by gravity all the way to my home from a creek a mile and half away.....have also a 550 gallons and a 2,500 gallons black water tanks...have a filter in garage and under the kitchen counter.
     
  13. JayJay

    JayJay Well-Known Member

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    Are those the lakes China is stealing from??

    Jesse Ventura topic last week/
     
  14. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    I have a cheap answer for that too. The bladder could be anywhere, in a garage or basement and hooked to a pump. I'll be taking it down soon for the winter and switching back to my well for the winter. The bladder will return around march or so.

    http://www.preparedsociety.com/foru...-collection-water-tower-my-solar-shower-3714/
     
  15. weedygarden

    weedygarden Well-Known Member

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    I know that living is tight in places like the Bronx. We don't know what he has access to, what he can and cannot do.

    I think that anyone who lives in any city could divert rain water to storage. It could be rain barrels, a water tank, or even food grade 5 gallon buckets with lids that are connected in a chain with short hose connections close to the top of the buckets.
     
  16. efbjr

    efbjr Well-Known Member

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    Stay???

    Leave as fast as you can. :eek:
     
  17. BillS

    BillS Well-Known Member

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  18. stayingthegame

    stayingthegame Well-Known Member

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    haven't you heard lately that the lakes were sold to a company in France. it's true a french water company bought the rights to the water in lake mich. bottling it out of Milwaukee.
     
  19. Emerald

    Emerald Well-Known Member

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    Well I hope that they are pumping it out of lake Michigan for sure--cuz you know--I pee in that lake when i go swimming! The bathrooms are just too far away! Bwaaahahaha Just think french folks are drinking my pee!:sssh:
     
  20. Barfife

    Barfife Member

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    Only works in sandy soil. Will not work in clay type soil or rocky soil either. Check before you waste your money.