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YourAdministrator, eh?
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An interesting article in today's Calgary Sun newspaper:

Lorrie Goldstein-Sun Media said:
Horse dung was the global threat in 1898

The next time you hear a Canadian environmentalist, politician or pundit warn we're going to destroy our planet by burning fossil fuels, think of horse manure. Seriously.

The dangers of horse manure to human civilization dominated discussion among delegates attending the world's first international urban planning conference held in New York City in 1898.

Much as delegates to the United Nations' never-ending climate change meetings today are obsessed about fossil fuels, delegates to that conference were obsessed about manure.

The reason was that horse-drawn carriages and wagons were burying New York and other global cities in a sea of dung.

In New York in 1898, 200,000 working horses produced an average of 24 pounds of horse manure every 24 hours, meaning almost five million pounds of manure were being dumped on city streets daily.

As Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner recount in their New York Times bestseller, Superfreakonomics:

"In vacant lots, horse manure was piled as high as sixty feet. It lined city streets like banks of snow. In the summer time, it stank to the heavens; when the rains came, a soupy stream of horse manure flooded the crosswalks and seeped into people's basements. Today, when you admire old New York brownstones and their elegant stoops, rising from street level to the second-storey parlour, keep in mind that this was a design necessity, allowing a homeowner to rise above the sea of horse manure.

"All of this dung was terrifically unhealthy. It was a breeding ground for billions of flies that spread a host of deadly diseases. Rats and other vermin swarmed the mountains of manure to pick out undigested oats and other horse feed … cities around the world were experiencing the same crisis."

Delegates debated ways to ameliorate the global manure crisis, warning projected population growth in the decades ahead would soon render large cities uninhabitable.

But since "the world had seemingly reached the point where its largest cities could not survive without the horse, but couldn't survive with it, either," the conference disbanded in defeat after only three days of a scheduled 10.

But then, as Levitt and Dubner note in arguing modern-day climate hysteria should be taken with a grain of salt, the crisis vanished, without "government fiat or divine intervention."

Why? Because of a new technology no one had thought of while projecting future horse emissions based on population growth.

That was the invention of the electric streetcar and (ironically) automobile, far more efficient, cleaner, safer and cheaper to own and operate than horses.

Levitt and Dubner argue today's climate alarmists are making the same mistake delegates to New York's manure conference did 113 years ago.

They're assuming today's technology will be the technology of the future, with the only significant change being we will have to use ever-increasing amounts of it, due to population growth.

What they're forgetting is human ingenuity, our ability to invent new technologies and adapt to new situations.

Climate alarmists today make their doomsday predictions assuming we will use the technologies of the present to power the future, just as the manure alarmists of 1898 assumed horses were the only things that would ever power a modern, urban transportation network.

Of course, if they were alive today, they'd have manure all over their faces.
 

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I invented the internet. :rofl:
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Excellent article. Reminds me of the book, The Population Bomb, by Paul and Anne Ehrlich. He made lots of specific doom and gloom predictions about the future. He was wrong on nearly every one. It's amazing that when some religious nut-case makes false predictions the media jumps all over him but have a left-wing, enviro-fruitcake be wrong and no one says a word about their credibility.

He also failed to figure in the human ingenuity factor.
 

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RockyMountainCanadian
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The french in some cities used the traffic generated horse manure to heat soil under cloches Row cover - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia for a longer food growing season. New york could use longer grownig seasons.
Most waste/ problems can be used efficiently is somebody tries, but some people just like to complain,but never offer solutions.:gaah:
 

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performing monkey
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Excellent article. Reminds me of the book, The Population Bomb, by Paul and Anne Ehrlich. He made lots of specific doom and gloom predictions about the future. He was wrong on nearly every one. It's amazing that when some religious nut-case makes false predictions the media jumps all over him but have a left-wing, enviro-fruitcake be wrong and no one says a word about their credibility.

He also failed to figure in the human ingenuity factor.
neither did Malthus... :dunno:

reminds me of this Washington Post (Associated Press) article:

The Arctic ocean is warming up, icebergs are growing scarcer and in some places the seals are finding the water too hot, according to a report to the Commerce Department yesterday from Consul Ifft, at Bergen, Norway.
Reports from fishermen, seal hunters and explorers, he declared, all point to a radical change in climate conditions and hitherto unheard-of temperatures in the Arctic zone. Exploration expeditions report that scarcely any ice has been met with as far north as 81 degrees 29 minutes. Soundings to a depth of 3,100 meters showed the gulf stream still very warm.
Great masses of ice have been replaced by moraines of earth and stones, the report continued, while at many points well known glaciers have entirely disappeared. Very few seals and no white fish are found in the eastern Arctic, while vast shoals of herring and smelts, which have never before ventured so far north, are being encountered in the old seal fishing grounds.
PS, it's from November of 1922 :eek: :rolleyes: :nuts:



http://wattsupwiththat.files.wordpress.com/2008/03/changing-artic_monthly_wx_review.png

from 1910-1959 ocean temps rose...

from 1960-1990 the fell or maintained...

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,944914,00.html

Monday, Jun. 24, 1974 Another Ice Age?

In Africa, drought continues for the sixth consecutive year, adding terribly to the toll of famine victims. During 1972 record rains in parts of the U.S., Pakistan and Japan caused some of the worst flooding in centuries. In Canada's wheat belt, a particularly chilly and rainy spring has delayed planting and may well bring a disappointingly small harvest. Rainy Britain, on the other hand, has suffered from uncharacteristic dry spells the past few springs. A series of unusually cold winters has gripped the American Far West, while New England and northern Europe have recently experienced the mildest winters within anyone's recollection.

As they review the bizarre and unpredictable weather pattern of the past several years, a growing number of scientists are beginning to suspect that many seemingly contradictory meteorological fluctuations are actually part of a global climatic upheaval. However widely the weather varies from place to place and time to time, when meteorologists take an average of temperatures around the globe they find that the atmosphere has been growing gradually cooler for the past three decades. The trend shows no indication of reversing. Climatological Cassandras are becoming increasingly apprehensive, for the weather aberrations they are studying may be the harbinger of another ice age. (See photos of how scientists are trying to keep Africa's deserts at bay.)

Telltale signs are everywhere - from the unexpected persistence and thickness of pack ice in the waters around Iceland to the southward migration of a warmth-loving creature like the armadillo from the Midwest.Since the 1940s the mean global temperature has dropped about 2.7° F. Although that figure is at best an estimate, it is supported by other convincing data. When Climatologist George J. Kukla of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory and his wife Helena analyzed satellite weather data for the Northern Hemisphere, they found that the area of the ice and snow cover had suddenly increased by 12% in 1971 and the increase has persisted ever since. Areas of Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic, for example, were once totally free of any snow in summer; now they are covered year round. (See a video on the history of climate change.)

Scientists have found other indications of global cooling. For one thing there has been a noticeable expansion of the great belt of dry, high-altitude polar winds - the so-called circumpolar vortex-that sweep from west to east around the top and bottom of the world. Indeed it is the widening of this cap of cold air that is the immediate cause of Africa's drought. By blocking moisture-bearing equatorial winds and preventing them from bringing rainfall to the parched sub-Sahara region, as well as other drought-ridden areas stretching all the way from Central America to the Middle East and India, the polar winds have in effect caused the Sahara and other deserts to reach farther to the south. Paradoxically, the same vortex has created quite different weather quirks in the U.S. and other temperate zones. As the winds swirl around the globe, their southerly portions undulate like the bottom of a skirt. Cold air is pulled down across the Western U.S. and warm air is swept up to the Northeast. The collision of air masses of widely differing temperatures and humidity can create violent storms-the Midwest's recent rash of disastrous tornadoes, for example.

See TIME's Pictures of the Week.

Sunspot Cycle.

The changing weather is apparently connected with differences in the amount of energy that the earth's surface receives from the sun. Changes in the earth's tilt and distance from the sun could, for instance, significantly increase or decrease the amount of solar radiation falling on either hemisphere-thereby altering the earth's climate. Some observers have tried to connect the eleven-year sunspot cycle with climate patterns, but have so far been unable to provide a satisfactory explanation of how the cycle might be involved.

Man, too, may be somewhat responsible for the cooling trend. The University of Wisconsin's Reid A. Bryson and other climatologists suggest that dust and other particles released into the atmosphere as a result of farming and fuel burning may be blocking more and more sunlight from reaching and heating the surface of the earth.

Climatic Balance. Some scientists like Donald Oilman, chief of the National Weather Service's long-range-prediction group, think that the cooling trend may be only temporary. But all agree that vastly more information is needed about the major influences on the earth's climate. Indeed, it is to gain such knowledge that 38 ships and 13 aircraft, carrying scientists from almost 70 nations, are now assembling in the Atlantic and elsewhere for a massive 100-day study of the effects of the tropical seas and atmosphere on worldwide weather. The study itself is only part of an international scientific effort known acronymically as GARP (for Global Atmospheric Research Program).

Whatever the cause of the cooling trend, its effects could be extremely serious, if not catastrophic. Scientists figure that only a 1% decrease in the amount of sunlight hitting the earth's surface could tip the climatic balance, and cool the planet enough to send it sliding down the road to another ice age within only a few years.

The earth's current climate is something of an anomaly; in the past 700,000 years, there have been at least seven major episodes of glaciers spreading over much of the planet. Temperatures have been as high as they are now only about 5% of the time. But there is a peril more immediate than the prospect of another ice age. Even if temperature and rainfall patterns change only slightly in the near future in one or more of the three major grain-exporting countries - the U.S., Canada and Australia - global food stores would be sharply reduced. University of Toronto Climatologist Kenneth Hare, a former president of the Royal Meteorological Society, believes that the continuing drought and the recent failure of the Russian harvest gave the world a grim premonition of what might happen. Warns Hare: "I don't believe that the world's present population is sustainable if there are more than three years like 1972 in a row."
in 1991 the U.S.S.R. fell, abandoning over 60% of all artic circle & 'above' weather/climate monitoring stations...

... temps dramatically rose :hmmm:
 

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Adventurer at large
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My father's gardens grew lush on the manure generated by my sister's horses......
Just find a 'market' for the stuff - even manure can be 'gold'. ;)
 

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performing monkey
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My father's gardens grew lush on the manure generated by my sister's horses......
Just find a 'market' for the stuff - even manure can be 'gold'. ;)
:eek: horse manure! :eek: It's great after it's mellowed for a year or so, but I have seen people load it onto their garden fresh (less than 1 week old) & then wonder why their plants 'burned'... even after I warned em'

I really hate when people ask for advice & then choose not to follow it, all the while bitching about their 'sorry lot'.
 
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