Missouri

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by Asatrur, Apr 16, 2010.

  1. Asatrur

    Asatrur Well-Known Member

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    If this is the wrong forum, please let me know. I have been reading various self-sufficiency sites, magazines, and forums and I notice a lot of stories, land, etc. is based in MO, AR, and the Ozarks and I was wondering what the draw is for that location particularly when the Madrid Fault there which is pretty prominent in the fiction stories here.
     
  2. HarleyRider

    HarleyRider Comic Relief Member

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    I'm not sure... it's not my fault. :rolleyes:
     

  3. HozayBuck

    HozayBuck Well-Known Member

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    :D:D:D:D:D:D:beercheer::beercheer:
     
  4. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    Alot of writers will talk about their own area of expertise. Because of Jerry's stories, I felt that I could start to write my own story based on what I know.

    I know nothing of the Ozarks (even needed to Google the Ozarks to find out what they are), but, I do know the Canadian Rockies (east and west sides) about as well as I know my own backyard having hiked, camped, 4-wheeled, cycled, skii'd, snowshoe'd, etc them since I was old enough to move under my own power (much to my parents dismay). I am told that I was 6 months old when I first camp'd deep in the nor'eastern Rockies and there have been very few summers / winters that I haven't camp'd deep in the Rockies since then.

    So - can you guess where my story is based? :sssh:

    Anyway - to get back to the "why" in your question - from my understanding, life in the south is fairly easy with no worries of snow, long growing season, warm temperatures, so, to make the stories a little easier to digest, move the characters to that zone so that you don't have to explain what life is like in the deep-freeze of the north ...
     
  5. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    It's my understanding that historically that area had the densest population of American Indians primarily because it would support more of them per square mile. Real estate prices there are conservative compared to many other parts of the US. It also has some gorgeous property there with clear cold lakes, many limestone caves, good growing seasons with adequate rainfall and a realtively mild climate. (Although they do get snow and ice and few tornadoes.) The crime rate is low as is the population density when compared to many other areas. The people tend to be conservative politcally (at least in the countryside) and they do have their share of kooks and fringe loonies. It is also an area of religious/prophetic significance to some Mormons.

    The downside is the New Madrid fault, they can have some killer ice storms, thunderstorms and tornadoes, it can get pretty hot there and the nuclear missile silos in Missouri and Kansas. In an all-out nuclear exchange the fallout would be severe. But there isn't a place on earth that's risk free so you prepare the best you can for known risks and take your chances on the rest.

    And they have lots of snakes!!! Every poisonous variety found in North America. I hate snakes!
     
  6. allen_idaho

    allen_idaho Well-Known Member

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    The New Madrid fault has always been one of those concern points with me. Much like a potential yellowstone eruption.

    The below image shows the entire affected area caused by a 6.8 magnitude earthquake of the New Madrid fault line in 1895. As you can see, if the same quake were to happen there today, it would most likely cause billions of dollars in damage by creating havoc in a number of major cities.

    [​IMG]

    The thing is that the fault is still very active. And with the increased amount of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions in the last few months, I strongly believe that the fault could potentially cause a major quake some time in the near future.

    This image, for example, shows a chart of every earthquake that has taken place in the area since the 1970's.

    [​IMG]

    And this image details the epicenter of the two major fault lines in the area.

    [​IMG]

    In the past few months, there has been a major earthquake in Haiti, China, Chile, Spain, Indonesia, Japan, California/Mexico, Nevada and Utah. As well as a volcanic eruption in a long dormant volcano in Iceland. That suggests to me that we are experiencing some strong continental drift. And that the problem is going to get worse.

    Just something to think about.
     
  7. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    Allen - and I thought that I was the only one starting to see a pattern of extreme earth-crust motion. I heard that in the last couple of days that a few more quakes have been felt in the US but that Yellowstone seems to be quieting down - that scares me even more! :eek:
     
  8. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    Would Yellowstone have an impact up in your area?
     
  9. allen_idaho

    allen_idaho Well-Known Member

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    I think it would have a global impact if it erupted. This is one of the largest active calderas in the world. The biggest supervolcano in the northern hemisphere.

    A mega-eruption of the yellowstone caldera would send so much debris into the upper atmosphere, we may wind up with around five or more years of year-long winter.

    While Calgary would not be under ash, southern canada from Saskatchewan east would be. Pretty much all of the eastern united states would be.
     
  10. HozayBuck

    HozayBuck Well-Known Member

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    Strange, just a few days ago I was having the same thoughts... maybe old Mother Earth has had it and is going to shrug us off her skin like pesky flies .. or not... anyway, yes there is way more then normal natural upheavals then usual, I'd say the big one is coming and soon... not that I know squat about it...
     
  11. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    I guess I should have phrased that a little differently. :rolleyes: I was thinking more along the lines of immediate ash fallout and shaking. I agree, if it decides to pop, we're all in for a world of hurt. :eek:
     
  12. Jason

    Jason I am a little teapot

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    I never really researched it but I was surprised to see how far into the active New Madrid zone I am here in Pittsburgh. Earthquakes are one thing I just never think about affecting me here-it's right up there with a tsunami as far as I'm concerned. And here it's a very real possibility. Thank you for posting those charts.
     
  13. truthismyname33

    truthismyname33 Member

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    Where do you go? I cannot afford to leave the country and even if I could, I don't think anyone can really be completely "free" of any disaster. So I do have some immediate plans of leaving FL. (where I am only 7 feet above sea level) with my children like VERY soon, just not sure as to where I should be heading. :(

    I have been having dreams...In my dreams I'm being prompt, if I may, to leave this end of Florida and quick! I have family that lives in Hinesville, Ga. I did the research and found that Hinesville is at: 86.48 feet above sea level. A lot higher than Fl. but yet not "high" enough, you understand?
     
  14. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    If it isn't a direct impact on my area (only a 7hr drive away straight-south) it would have many indirect impacts with people fleeing the destroyed areas looking for a safe haven as well as possible tremors and such ... :scratch

    I would say that depending on the wind-direction (wind from California heading north) we might be ash'd.
     
  15. allen_idaho

    allen_idaho Well-Known Member

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    Historically speaking, the below two images show the primarily affected areas of the last two major eruptions of the Yellowstone Caldera. This is generally how the wind has affected the ash in both cases.

    However, the yellow areas in the maps only indicate large concentrations of ash of anywhere from 3-12 feet of accumulation. Smaller amounts of ash did reach much further north, east, and south but in lesser amounts.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]