Midwest and Eastern heat wave

Discussion in 'General Chit-Chat' started by bunkerbob, Jul 6, 2010.

  1. bunkerbob

    bunkerbob Supporting Member

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    How are all of my friends in the Midwest and the Eastern US fairing during this heat wave. Hope everyone is doing fine and surviving the extreme heat and humidity.:surrender:
    Not to down play, but, we have had one of the mildest summers for quite a while, pretty unusual to have 50 degree nights and less than 100 degree days this time of year around here. :dunno:
     
  2. ZoomZoom

    ZoomZoom Rookie Prepper

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    It's hot... damn hot.

    I have a pinched nerve in my neck so I can't help with baling hay. Due to daily spring rains, many farmers weren't able to get in their first cutting until about now. Being in the fields (or hayloft) in this heat is punishing.

    I stick to morning and evening for doing things outside that require any physical exertion. After work (but when it's still screaming hot), I do some indoor chores or do things in the bunker.
     

  3. Genevieve

    Genevieve I'm done - gone

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    It's summer. It gets this hot usually. When it doesn't is whats unusual. Last year we had a wet cool summer. Very few hot days like we're getting. Hardly any swimming in the pool.
    This heat will help with the sugar content of the orchards around here.
    I just do things predawn if I can. I was out watering the garden this morning. I cooked enough on the grill yesterday so I don't have to cook today ( triple digits today here). Thank goodness we have air conditioning. If we didn't there wouldn't be very much getting done. I don't do heat well. I'm more of a cold weather person. Love the cold!
     
  4. Woody

    Woody Woodchuck

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    Yeah it’s hot but we get this almost every year, this year is just a bit earlier than usual. What is bad is the lack of rain at my place. We have the usual summer thunderstorms but all have been either north or south of us. I have been watering the garden from the well for over a week now. As pointed out above, early morning or after the sun goes down else it is brutal to be doing much. At least for old fogies.

    My vegetable garden pretty much shuts down for a month-er-so in the summer. Even with water and mulch it is too hot even for tomatoes some years. They go dormant for a few weeks and come back after a few rains and when nights get back into the lower 80’s. This and big *** bugs is why some of us live is the SE US!
     
  5. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    Sigh...and it's dipped into the 30's for the past 6 nights here...:eek:

    Even had the woodstove fired up this morning. July 6th!!!

    We might hit the 70's today, after several days in the 50's and 60's.

    Normal right now would be in the 80's, with 50's at night.
     
  6. kyfarmer

    kyfarmer Well-Known Member

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    It's July in Kentucky, there ya go it's always hot as the dickens here in July and Agust but i think this one is a bit early. Around 2 ta day it was 97 in the shade. Hot i reckon was weed eaten a hill side and the dang pull rope broke off in the thang. I'll fix it today and wait till this evening and finish up. Might put that berry pickin off till tomorow. No shade where the good ones are. Stay cool.
     
  7. sailaway

    sailaway Well-Known Member

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    Last year we only had 5 days in the 90s, alot more this year. Mrs. sailaway and I are having words so I have moved out of the ac home and onto the non ac boat. I have been doing alot of sailing and swimming though to stay cool. I am getting used to living on 12 volt and cooking with charcoal or propane. I have also been trying to catch enough fish to have a filling meal once a day. I do enjoy the liveabord life even though the boat is a little warm and I miss having my Lab with me all the time.:cry:
     
  8. Littlebit

    Littlebit Well-Known Member

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    Hot up here, but not dying yet. :)
     
  9. longtime

    longtime Well-Known Member

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    Kansas/Missouri temperatures are normal to cool. No problems here.
     
  10. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    HOT!!!

    Every corn field around has curling leaves; including mine. It's a little inconvenient but I've had to start dragging 200' of hose out to the corn. I've been watering it everyday for the last 4 days. We REALLY need some rain.

    It was 100° here today and forecast to be the same until Friday.
     
  11. horseman09

    horseman09 Well-Known Member

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    Well, UncleJoe, we're about 100 air miles NE of you and about 10 degrees cooler. :p My corn isn't shriveling yet, but it's gonna if we don't get rain real soon. Our corn patch is a little less than 1/2 an acre, but even that is more than I want to water out of my well. I watered half of my garden today. I'll water the other half tomorrow. We put out 144 mater plants, plus 54 peppers, carrots, onions, 54 broccolie (sp?), 7 rows of beats, lettuce and Swiss Chard. Just put in a row of B Sprouts starts. Like to put 2 more in if my darned ankle is too swollen. Our first row of radishes are done, so I replanted them. Had to water then too, since they just sprouted. We have a good well, but I don't wanna push it.

    PA is likely to get rain in the next few days via T storms. Best wishes to you........hope we both get a good rain without the hail of last year. :(
     
  12. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    Aw, man, horseman! Lucky you! We have to struggle with and baby our dozen tomato plants and half a dozen pepper plants in this cold climate and practically throw a party for each tomato or pepper we get! I have 255 hills of potatoes, though! And over 100 broccoli plants and lord knows how many rows of peas!

    I loved hearing about your gardening. Take care of that ankle, and keep telling us more!
     
  13. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    We only have about 3500sf and I only planted half of it. The other half was to go in the first week of July but I decided to let that go this year. The chickens will just get a little less this winter. :rolleyes:
    I'm also concerned about taking large amounts of water from the well. I don't do a blanket watering, I water each individual plant out to about 8" from the stalk. It takes me 1- 1-1/4 hrs a night to do it that way but it's halfway grown and I don't want to lose it now.
     
  14. ZoomZoom

    ZoomZoom Rookie Prepper

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    Have you considered "soaker hose" or "drip irrigation tape"? They're relatively cheap and you can also make your own. I know a lot of people that use this and it works well. Some also attach it (with an inline valve) to a rain barrel so they don't have to use their well as much.
     
  15. Genevieve

    Genevieve I'm done - gone

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    I water my garden by hand also. I do each plant and use the water from the rain barrel we have set up. We don't have a huge garden. Just some raised beds which do fine for us right now. I think doing each plant helps with the evaporation factor much better than how the neighbor does their sprinkler they have set up.
    I hope we get some of the rain thats being forcast for the end of the week. The garden and the rain barrel both need it!
     
  16. Woody

    Woody Woodchuck

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    I water by hand also, best use of a resource. I have my gardens on weekly schedules in cooler weather, 3 day cycles in this weather. I divide the areas in sections and water each one separately. For example, one section is tomatoes, beans, cukes and when applicable, greens. Another section is peppers, squash, peas and such and the herb garden. Last section would be the cash crops like tobacco and the outlying herbs and edible flowers.

    Monday I’ll water section 1 thoroughly. I go along and water each plant or row until I complete the circuit. I then go back and do it again. After each pass I dig my shovel in to see just how deep my watering went and how moist the soil is, adjusting the mulch as needed. I usually do 3 times through the circuit to get water down nice and deep. Next day I will water the next section. After 3 days I go back to section 1. To water the entire operation at once would not only take a great deal of time but also, I feel, put a strain on the well level.

    This has worked well for many years. By the time I start the circuit again the first area is in need of water but not bone dry.
     
  17. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    That's how I water too. By hand, at the base/root of the plants, and I divide my garden in sections and water one part each day.

    We have a rain water collection system that drains the water from the corners of the house into a large tank out back. From there we use a pump to fill several stock tanks in the garden as needed.

    When that runs out in long dry spells, we have a marsh on our property that we pump water out of with a gas-powered pump. Good water for a garden, too. Lots of plant and animal matter simmering in it. If the marsh starts looking dry there's a small lake a mile away on the same dirt road we live on, and we get water there.
     
  18. horseman09

    horseman09 Well-Known Member

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    Gypsiesue, it sounds like you and MMM are pretty well fixed for water no matter what.

    Re: warm weather plants in a cooler weather clime......have you considered mini greenhouses? Make'em out of cheap 1/2 pvc, about 2 ft wide and 8 ft long, dome shaped, and covered with greenhouse plastic (regular plastic degrades pretty fast with UV)? Take them off the rows of maters or peppers in the morning if its gonna get hot and set them between the rows. It helps to heat the ground and conserve ground moisture and they are easier to remove than individual "hats". Stick'em back on in the evening if it's gonna get cold.

    UncleJoe, so, how do you feel about doing a rain dance for us? :eek: Uhhh, just remember........shorts are a minimum requirement. :wave:
     
  19. horseman09

    horseman09 Well-Known Member

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    gypsysue, that lots of broccoli and taters! How do you store the potatoes? Do they keep pretty well for you over the winter?
     
  20. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    horseman09: We store the potatoes (carrots, and turnips) in our root cellar. They keep clear into the next summer. In the late spring break off any eyes that are starting to grow. With carrots I break off tops that are trying to grow. We still have two wooden boxes of potatoes and half a bushel of carrots from last summer. I've been working on dehydrating them before this year's crop is ready.

    We used to have a 10' by 20' greenhouse which got damaged beyond repair a few years ago in a wind storm. We use the PVC and plastic now, but they're pretty fragile. The wind can be hard on them. I unroll the plastic on sunny days mid-summer. After mid-August I pretty much leave the covers on. (These two pictures are from back in early June. Things are growing good now!) You'll notice I used duct tape and baling twine on it too.

    We've collected 8 patio glass doors now (the ones that are about 3' wide and 7' tall) and plan to frame a greenhouse and use those. We'll buy opaque fiberglass roofing for it. That'll be next summer. (This picture was last week.)

    Right now MMM is building a water tower stand for the 300-gallon tank that was recently given to us.
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    Last edited: Jul 7, 2010