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performing monkey
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4,230 Posts
NOW . . .
If I could just get my shop down to 12 volts I'd be entirely off grid
I could really use a 12 volt lathe, drill press etc.
hmmmmm
how about a 12 volt motor hooked up to a 220 generator (he said with a grin)
how about a small tractor with a PTO to the generator :2thumb:
 

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I've run a shovel b'fore
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3 Posts
I'm a little late getting here but I built and lived in a 16X27 cabin with a wife and two kids and no running water for three years. It isn't nearly as hard as folk want to think it is. I find that you can adjust to a lack of what we think are "modern needs" with very little impact on actual quality of life.

I am currently beginning work on a 20X25 cabin that I plan to die in with my wife in about fifty years (I admit, I hope I go first. I don't want to lose her. Any woman that will haul water in a crappy old Ford while I am off working on the road is a keeper!):D We cooked on a wood stove a lot of the time and I lived in a tent while we were building it. We have a seriously skewed idea of the difference between a "need" and a "want" these days.
 

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3,183 Posts
Forgotten thread..

WOW, time has passed since this thread started... after looking at the small cabin idea, and after rethinking it I still like the idea, but have also looked at my Travel Trailer and have decided that for now it's serving it's purpose , it already is a small cabin it already has everything I would have to put in the cabin, so why bother with a cabin?

It's an Arctic Fox 25 ft with slider, one of the best TT's built, made for cold weather living and is fully self contained...

I will one day build my cabin but for now I can do with what I have..while not having as much room as I'd like it still has all I "need"...

I know my desire to drag the TT all over the country has never worked out so I will just block it up and remove the tires and let it be, a pole barn roof over it and a screened deck and it's good to go..

Less is really better...
 

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I invented the internet. :rofl:
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3,698 Posts
...Less is really better...
Now these are words we can all take to heart! After hearing people talk about what they "need" to live I often wonder how mankind survived so many thousands of years before we had running water, electricity, central air conditioning, special clothes for every occassion from riding bicycles to climbing mountains to running, computers, cars, planes, trains, refrigeration .............

:gaah:
 

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I agree MMM... about 3 years ago I bought a pair of them wanna be hippy sandals... Berkinwhozitz... and started wearing cargo shorts..and tee shirts, since I spend winters in E TX and summers in MT I can pretty much were them all the time.. and ya know I like it!! less is good!...

My Mom can't understand why I don't have a ton of cloths including suits... hahah, I've never owned a suit that wasn't issued to me by the Corps!! never will..

If we had less, needed less, wanted less, we would have more money to buy.... less?:confused:

For me it means freedom, freedom to leave one place and go to another place without hiring a moving van... freedom to go to see to smell...life

I've been telling NK and GS about how I'm gonna sell the big Dodge and get a Ford E cargo van and make it into a rolling do all be all bed room dining room etc... go where I want, see what I want, park anyplace to sleep.. fuel and food... what more is needed?

I'll have my place in E TX for when I need / want to be there but the freedom of life and the road calls...

Yes, less is more! it really is... less gives you more of your time and your life to be used and enjoyed.. and at the end of it all isn't that what it's all about? living? seeing, enjoying? why does it take so long to find this out?

Someplace out there there is a lake or creek or river I've never seen with a fish waiting for me to find it... dinner to cook over the fire.. and a sunset to watch while waiting for the stars to come out and play.....

I've seen a lot in my years and missed so much more... it's time to play catch up... may see yawl down in the desert this winter!! if I can get this van project done by then...
 

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The wanderer
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4,350 Posts
Hozay, you got your head screwed on right! I think your van plan is a good one! As you know, MMM and I bought a small uhaul truck and we're making it into a BOV/camper/wander-wagon to feed my discontent! I love to wander around the country and see what's out there. An adventure is always around the next corner! As someone who loves to wander and explore, it's no surprise I love the Christmas song that starts out "I wonder as I wander out under the stars".

Our cabin is 16' by 32', and we built on a 12' by 16' bedroom addition, which housed 4 kids before they grew up and left home. People kept telling us to build bigger. Why? More taxes, more upkeep, more cleaning. Now the kids are gone and we have more room than we need.
 

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Supporting Member
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50 Posts
I personally had been considering a small home for over two years. I had always been on the fence about it until recently. I decided to look into purchasing plans and modifying them as I see fit. I decided on http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/products/popomo/> mainly cause the cost was dirt cheap and in my situation cost is a great factor in how I purchase items. Another key factor in my decision is mobility and storage. I figure if i can store my preps and have them already in a vehicle that I just need to hook up to and go. For the most part I have had to keep my preps hidden from my current girlfriend and until recently everything was fantastic. Then I had a personal SHTF situation and found out the place I had been living was $41k behind in taxes and mortgage. I was given 3 days to vacate so I rented a storage unit and rented a uhaul to move. My girlfriend was more than willing to help me out. I have lived a minimalist lifestyle for many years so I have not accumulated much junk. I have what is needed and not much more. When we came to my area where my preps were stored she was in she was shocked and immediately was concerned. I then realized that I had made a huge mistake in asking for her help she works for the state welfare division. We had a long talk (7 hours) of how and why i prep. I used a tragedy that had happened near us to justify my preps and explained that I had enough preps for her and her two children, my two children and my father who is disabled. A little stretching of the truth never helped so much. By the end of the conversation she had turned her view around and started supporting my lifestyle. She called her father and had him haul up their old pace arrow motor home that has not been used since the early 90's. We parked it on a piece of land that I had acquired dirt cheap out in the boonies. Being in Minnesota the winters get cold, so I am building the tiny home to withstand a Minnesota winter. I do not know how long it will take but I am sure once it is finished I will eventually move this old beast out and set up the house on a semi permanent area I have been clearing. I plan to build an underground cellar as my first priority to hide and store my preps. To my surprise she researched all the codes and requirements and has made sure that all of my plans would be able to be done without state hassle :woohoo:. I know it will take a while longer than I had hoped but at least I have a place to start over.
 

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Still waiting for the zombies.
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1,596 Posts
Jadedsoul, I've been to that site in the past and it has some really neat small homes. Definitely worth a look for anyone interested in these.

Also, good to hear that your girlfriend saw the light and came around to what should be a normal way of thinking!
 

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Junior Member
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109 Posts
I'm glad to find this thread as it's one of my favorite topics. My "dream" home is no McMansion. It's a 400sq ft or less home. I already live in about a 30X12 apt and I love it! Its WAY small for storage, the only main problem, but otherwise I love not paying all this extra money in rent when I don't have to have the space. Easy to clean, keep up, frees up funds for other things and I could go on and on. It has forced me to simplify my life which has brought nothing but less stress. I'm a huge advocate for it.
 

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Member
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414 Posts
500 sq foot cottage opps 600 minimum requirement for insurance with my INS company. Check with Ins companies first on minimum size they will insure........
Natural gas heat wood stove in shed for the just in case. 2 small bedrooms well insulated, deck, holding tanks 2500 gallons of water , 3000 black water tank, rented most of summer to offset mortgage...... 21 foot trailer on property as bunkie.. cheap to heat and carries for next to nothing with the weekly summer rentals. Will be our retirement home..... If we last that long or our government stops raising the retirement age LMAO
 

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Building the World Round
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112 Posts
Small Domes

The monolithic domes i can build are ideal for micro-homes except fot the portability. Have already built several that are 300 ft2. Super energy effcient and almost indestructable. The one in this picture is 10' diameter, about 80 ft2. shelter 2.jpg

This one is a tornado shelter
 

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kejmack said:
Ranger, can you post a picture of your house? I'd love to see it!
Even if i did have camera, i wouldnt show you because i dont want you to follow me if something happens. It looks like a big metal box with windows.......... Its my first BOL because its on a trailer and i can take it pretty much anywhere! (m35a2)
 

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The dome buildings are inexpensive, easy to build, easy to maintain: but there must be a way to secure it to the ground: in a tornado, the "most" killing force is the debris, AND the fact the wind would pick the building up and fling it like a bad frisbee is also lethal problem. So, when considering such, keep the wind and debris in mind if choosing this for a "tornado" house. For a TEMPORARY bugout building, it COULD serve as one, if it is as small as the picture is showing. For any real long term shelter, they are too primative and small to sustain during a SECOND winter for example; most supplies could be laid up for a 6 month or even year's time line, but beyond that [and if the Power Grid went down 2dary to a solar flare/CME or even nuclear EMP, THAT could be a real scenario] there must be a way to self sustain power and food -farming - and of course water acquisition and storage. No amount of drying makes a gallon of water smaller than it is[ :) ]. So, plan as if your life depended on it...Be careful,be smart, so you don't have to be lucky...
 

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Building the World Round
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112 Posts
The dome buildings are inexpensive, easy to build, easy to maintain: but there must be a way to secure it to the ground: in a tornado, the "most" killing force is the debris, AND the fact the wind would pick the building up and fling it like a bad frisbee is also lethal problem. So, when considering such, keep the wind and debris in mind if choosing this for a "tornado" house. For a TEMPORARY bugout building, it COULD serve as one, if it is as small as the picture is showing.
Actually monolithic domes have been constructed as 'safe rooms' and designated 'near absolute' protection by FEMA. I have built 2 community shelters that were mostly funded by FEMA grants for mobile home communities. The 10' diameter dome pictured has a tested tornado door and is designed to be free standing. It's far too heavy to be picked up by any wind. A home would be anchored as well by the footing. The difference between the tornado shelters and a home would be the absence of windows and the 1/4" solid steel doors in the shelters.

My bad!! The small dome pictured DOES NOT have the tornado rated door.
 
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