Prepared Society Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
RockyMountainCanadian
Joined
·
4,288 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This seems to be a break $hit year, all the hay at home went up with out any trouble, but when our Son got about 6 miles away on some share crop he had a knife head break,on his haybine, nothing serious. but it was well after dark(Friday) when we got that fixed and back together. Next day I went 4 hours south with the highway tractor and scissorneck to pick up a farm tractor (and some other toys) that he had bought at auction. 1/2 way home (Saturday) he calls to tell me that the hitch on the haybine has broken. He went Custom baling so we took it apart sunday morning and spent most of the day fixing it. we have a very well equipped shop so it was back together Sunday evening. Things went fairly smooth until Thursday when he discovered a Rear tire coming apart on his baling tractor( 20.8-38s) 2 new tires another day and a bunch of money.

how is this going to work if shtf?
 

·
somewhat moldy
Joined
·
239 Posts
Thats when you hope that SHTF is so bad that nothing will work any ways.

As it is, I just dread when the electronic clutch, or some such thing goes out on the tractor. We are trying to learn how to do our own repairs, but try to order a proper repair MSF tractor manual and see how much they want to ding you for that.

A set of fuel filters is a hundred dollars and thats the easy stuff. We just wasted a whole day ripping the lawn mower apart and fixing what didn't get fixed by the fixit guys. They want $15,000. to fix the diesel pick up. We figure parts to be around $5,000.00 along with engine hoists and bits and pieces. It will take a year or two but eventually we will figure it out for ourselves. Meanwhile, its a whole lot cheaper to just rent a pick up for those occasions where one is essential. No up keep or insurance/registration in the meanwhile.

We do our best to maintain our equipment, but some years suck and the suck is always on a Friday or long week-end with no way to get parts even if they happen to be in stock.
 

·
RockyMountainCanadian
Joined
·
4,288 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
the weekend suck happened to our neighbors, they phoned on Friday just before noon to say that they had haybine problems, I told them if they could get it in our yard I might be able to get to it soon, I looked at it and what they thought was wrong looked simple enough, so I fixed that, If that had been the problem they would have been set. NO the noise they heard was a major U joint failure, inside the hitch, next model newer than my sons, Argh 4 hours (The "improvements" on the hitch joint are way harder to take apart) later I had the wrecked parts out, now they get to hunt for parts Monday........
 

·
Winston Smith Sent Me
Joined
·
4,996 Posts
The only answer I see is older machines that are easier to fix (as they are generally simpler), a whole lotta spare parts(old tractor graveyard?), and the ability to manufacture some parts in the form of a forge. MacGyver fixit skills will be priceless. Back up plans are good. Two is one and one is none. In an extended disruption of the supply chain we will be back to 18th century techniques in a relatively short period of time. If I had a farm I would probably have a couple big horses, the farm tools to go with them, and be experimenting with the techniques used along with a plan to scale back production to the capabilities of that equipment. A lot easier said than done. Farming was far more of a backbreaking endeavor in earlier times. Its hard work even with all our machines. I worked on a tobacco farm in a different country that didnt allow farm machinery into the country (as it took all the unskilled labor jobs) and it was extremely hard work even with a lot of people. And we still had trucks, pvc piping, power, etc. Its going to take a village to operate each farm in an extended grid down scenarion even at a reduced production.
 

·
Dogs breath
Joined
·
2,597 Posts
I'm too old and too physically beatup(worn out) to do that stuff anymore.

But, we have a HUGE Amish community about 30 miles from us, we visit them at least once a month, usually more.

They are so independent, so skilled at using old farming techniques, horses, mules, and equipment.
No eletricity, no gas operated machinery.

They raise ALL their own food , and support each other with all other supplies.

Everytime we visit , I tell the wife... I could move right in and be at home.

She say's we are too old.:(:eek:

She's right.....Oh to be 20 years younger.:rolleyes:



Jim
 

·
RockyMountainCanadian
Joined
·
4,288 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
While I fully agree that knowing the skills to do things without mechanization are really important, the vast amount of time and labour even a small tractor can save is also going to be critical.
 

·
I invented the internet. :rofl:
Joined
·
3,698 Posts
Have some horses on hand along with harness and some old farm equipment or maybe have some older equipment that doesn't use electronics. I can make a lot of old stuff work but electronics can't often be bypassed. The worst thing about modern equipment, cars, etc. is that they all need highly specialized parts to run. If TSHTF plan on walking or working by hand.
 

·
somewhat moldy
Joined
·
239 Posts
Have some horses on hand along with harness and some old farm equipment or maybe have some older equipment that doesn't use electronics. I can make a lot of old stuff work but electronics can't often be bypassed. The worst thing about modern equipment, cars, etc. is that they all need highly specialized parts to run. If TSHTF plan on walking or working by hand.
And the old stuff is getting rarer than hens teeth. DH bought an old milling machine and metal lathe so he can make parts for basic stuff. The trick will be generating enough electricity to run them when needed. We are making headway on that as well.
 

·
RockyMountainCanadian
Joined
·
4,288 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
And the old stuff is getting rarer than hens teeth. DH bought an old milling machine and metal lathe so he can make parts for basic stuff. The trick will be generating enough electricity to run them when needed. We are making headway on that as well.
My plan is to run them with a gas engine, I already have an engine from a swather running my big air compressor, it could belt up to my lathe fairly easily.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
Our old hay dump rake is from the 1800s. Works great every year. Personally if the shtf i don't want anything with a computer. Old equipment will be easier to keep moving. That said my gramp needed a new tractor and was basically broke for cash so he hauled up his old 71 chevy one ton and made one out of that. It's pretty impressive and works rather well.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,707 Posts
I always imagined that during SHTF, there will be little access to fuel and alternative methods of farm work would be needed. I imagine cutting hay with a scythe, instead of a haybine/swather/windrower. I imagine farming going back to smaller acreages, because that is all that can be imagined.
 

·
RockyMountainCanadian
Joined
·
4,288 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I will find a way to keep my machinery working, people invented the stuff to ease the work load, I will do what ever I can to keep as much going as possible, unless the owner was a lawyer in the pre shtf then they get to work by hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
I will find a way to keep my machinery working, people invented the stuff to ease the work load, I will do what ever I can to keep as much going as possible, unless the owner was a lawyer in the pre shtf then they get to work by hand.
Fuel won't be the problem if it's a gas engine it can run off methane. They did it during ww1. Oil will be the problem. Lubrication as in engine oil will be hard to get, but not impossible.
 

·
RockyMountainCanadian
Joined
·
4,288 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Fuel won't be the problem if it's a gas engine it can run off methane. They did it during ww1. Oil will be the problem. Lubrication as in engine oil will be hard to get, but not impossible.
good point, but a lot of store carry it in 5 gallon buckets, and when BlueZ'z phase one hits more extra oil is on my list, you gotta feed your crew.
 

·
somewhat moldy
Joined
·
239 Posts
good point, but a lot of store carry it in 5 gallon buckets, and when BlueZ'z phase one hits more extra oil is on my list, you gotta feed your crew.
Extra oil for big and small machines, machine oil, lubricating oil, chain oil, transmission oil, filters, fuel conditioners, gasket material; all way more important than TP.
 

·
Cowboy
Joined
·
3,568 Posts
Fuel won't be the problem if it's a gas engine it can run off methane. They did it during ww1. Oil will be the problem. Lubrication as in engine oil will be hard to get, but not impossible.
I'd suspect that there would be numerous abandoned vehicles that one could reclaim the oil from...at least for awhile.
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
1,292 Posts
I'd suspect that there would be numerous abandoned vehicles that one could reclaim the oil from...at least for awhile.
I do agrea with that, in the 3 book series of "Rule of Three" they talk about harvesting all sort of car parts to help their community.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
Also look for engine break in oil. It is and additive for engine break in that has a lot of zinc and phosphorus. This added to worn out oil can extend the oil life. Actually if you have an older engine and are running modern oil they removed the zinc and phosphorus in modern oil because modern roller rockers and modern lifters don't require it but older engines do. Any tappet valved engine like older L head briggs or old flat heads in tractors, and any non roller rocker push rod valve neefs zinc or it will eat the cam or the rocker. I use stp engine break in oil. Can extend your oil life in a shtf scenario.
 

·
RockyMountainCanadian
Joined
·
4,288 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Also look for engine break in oil. It is and additive for engine break in that has a lot of zinc and phosphorus. This added to worn out oil can extend the oil life. Actually if you have an older engine and are running modern oil they removed the zinc and phosphorus in modern oil because modern roller rockers and modern lifters don't require it but older engines do. Any tappet valved engine like older L head briggs or old flat heads in tractors, and any non roller rocker push rod valve neefs zinc or it will eat the cam or the rocker. I use stp engine break in oil. Can extend your oil life in a shtf scenario.
GM engine oil supplement , and napa sells a zinc rich additive, Diesel oils have more zinc etc also,
And at least here wally world still sells straight grade oil for Detroit diesel 2 strokes, this will lube an old engine well, but every fourth change a high detergent 15w40 diesel oil will help gather the crud.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top