Long term food storage "What Way"

Discussion in 'General Food and Foraging Discussion' started by TreeMUPKennel, Feb 15, 2010.

  1. TreeMUPKennel

    TreeMUPKennel Well-Known Member

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    How or what way is or are ya'll usen to store food for long periods of time, long term storage. Or rice grains and beans and so on. What the best way to seal them to maintain there quality. Im mean are you all adding things to it or ??????? I seen a post on a seperate forum thread were a guy uses argon gas to fill the bucket and then seals it. Tring to find the easiest and best way for me to put some larger quantitys of stuff aside. Help me out:nuts:
     
  2. Lake Windsong

    Lake Windsong Well-Known Member

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    We tend to grow alot of the food we store, so we can veggies, fruit, meat, etc. Most of the preps we have are easily rotated season to season this way. But longer term, I still use glass jars, sometimes with oxygen absorbers, sometimes without. I've seen people use mylar bags with oxygen absorbers and sealed inside plastic buckets. Also heard people talk of using the LDS canneries, but I haven't personally done either. Have bought the #10 cans already sealed, those are great, IMO. Less chance for rodents, smaller portion to use up once opened.
     

  3. jungatheart

    jungatheart Beginner's Mind

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  4. bunkerbob

    bunkerbob Supporting Member

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    Here is a good basic site that may answer your questions, there is 2 parts...

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pal88fR5COI]YouTube - Bucket Packing with Wendy Mae - Part 1[/ame] part 1

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gq4zpLfOSfE]YouTube - Bucket Packing with Wendy Mae - Part 2[/ame] part 2
     
  5. SurvivalNut

    SurvivalNut Retired Army

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    Greensboro NC has an LDS Cannery, I don't know if it is wet or dry.

    I use my #10 cans, which are good for 30 years, in everyday use.

    A friend just fed his 30 year old wheat to his chickens. I have a year of food for 10 people who would come to roost.

    When I pass, in another 30+ years, my food storage will still have 30 years on the shelf for the next generation.

    I keep a standing offer open to take anyone to the Spokane, WA cannery.
     
  6. SaskBound

    SaskBound Well-Known Member

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    Well, not high-tech or anything, and we do not have concerns with bugs or humidity where we live, but we buy wheat, lentils, beans, rice, sugar, and such by the bag (usually 20 to 60 pounds) and store it in the original bag in galvanized garbage cans on 2x4's to keep them off the floor. We also store some stuff (powdered milk, dried cranberries, etc) in their original packages in rubbermaid containers Our biggest concern is keeping rodents out.
     
  7. SaskBound

    SaskBound Well-Known Member

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    PS - we rotate most of our stuff on a 6 month to 3 year rotation, so we're not so concerned about stuff keeping for 20+ years.
     
  8. TreeMUPKennel

    TreeMUPKennel Well-Known Member

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    Mostly looking to store rice, sugar, wheat, and some good ole pinter beans. That would be my large stock pile of say 5 gallon buckets or so. :D
     
  9. Genevieve

    Genevieve I'm done - gone

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    sugar just needs to stay dry to stay good, and even then if you beat the lumps down, you can still use it. I just keep mine in a very clean 5 gallon bucket with a tight lid. I've just bought some wheat and still haven't processed it for LTS. I plan on using 5 gallon buckets,mylar bags and oxy absorbs. So far my beans are on the low side, but I plan on buying some beautiful gallon mason jars and use them to store the different beans. But I imagine if you are storing 50lbs or more, the bucket method would work.
    I don't know anything about these gases people are using. The mylar and oxy absob method is easy and doable for everyone, so thats what I go with.
     
  10. bunkerbob

    bunkerbob Supporting Member

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    The "gas" that I use is CO2(carbon dioxide) from a pressurized tank, helps displace the O2(oxygen) in the buckets prior to putting the oxy aborb and bay leaves in, actually makes them more effective by getting rid of most of that O2. It also is heavier than air and stays in the bucket even after opening. Some use dry ice to displace the air, but it tends to cause moisture build up though.
     
  11. TreeMUPKennel

    TreeMUPKennel Well-Known Member

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    Found good site with food grade buckets to order my 5 gallon buckets to store my goods in. Was thinking bout the mason jars to for a few other type beans. But pinters are my favorite I'd go crazy with out them. I'd have to resort to lotting a grocery store if the SHTF:dunno:
    Just got to order some of the ox pouches. And round up a good size thing of bay leaves too. And I'll be good to go. Was at Sam's club shopping and seen they have 50 lbs bags of sugar for $25. WOW great deal to me. Forgot to check the rice out, next week I guess.
     
  12. Genevieve

    Genevieve I'm done - gone

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    I have discovered that dry wall buckets are food grade , so thats what I use. Hubby brings home all the ones he uses up from work. I clean them in hot soapy water with bleach added, then rinse really good and dry and they're ready.
     
  13. TreeMUPKennel

    TreeMUPKennel Well-Known Member

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    Sure cant beat the free stuff:D
     
  14. mdprepper

    mdprepper I sold my soul to The_Blob. He had candy...

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    Mountain rose herbs sells them in 4oz, 8oz and 1lb packages for a decent price.
     
  15. neldarez

    neldarez Supporting Member

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    Is there still a cannery in Spokane? I'm only 150 miles from there.
     
  16. JayJay

    JayJay Well-Known Member

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    Yep--I bought several from the guy near us--$1 each.

    I have bay leaf and D.E in all my buckets.
    D.E. for little critters and bay leaf for the same.

    http://www.everythingprepared.com/HomeFoodStorage/FoodStorageInsectControl.html

    I keep bay leaf in all my drawers and cabinets in the kitchen.