Living Aboard

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by sailaway, Jul 13, 2009.

  1. sailaway

    sailaway Well-Known Member

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    The wife and I spent 5 days living aboard the sailboat this last week. We spent a couple nights on the hook in the anchorages and a couple of nights at marinas. We caught a few fish along the way and had bicycles for transportation on the L.E. Islands. We used both AC and DC power which lead to maint. issues. I definatly need to put an inspection program together for the systems on the boat. Every thing was working but I have begun to notice some humidity driven corrosion. It was fun just living in a small salon about 12' long and 9' max beem. This area contained the galley, navigation station and setee table that dropped down into a bed for us. For cooking we used the alcohal stove, and a charcoal and gas stove. The galley ice box kept our fresh produce and drinks nice and cool, we only used about 30#s of ice. What few clothes we brought we threw in the V Birth (for me just a couple swim suits and tee shirts.) There was nothing more refreshing than hopping off the transom for a bath in Lake Erie. We also did some touring and exploring with the inflatable. The wind was fresh the whole week and the sunsets were beautiful. It was fun being on the schedule of sunrise and sunset, with a little supplimenting of 12 volt or candles. With no tv and leaving the radio off we had some great conversations and resolved some issues. (we can only get 30' away from each other on our boat.) The boat is a great escape from society for us and a great way to enjoy living. Sailaway:cool:
     
  2. Expeditioner

    Expeditioner Well-Known Member

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    What type of sailboat do you have?
     

  3. sailaway

    sailaway Well-Known Member

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    We currently have a 1985 ODay 31. We have owned a Catalina 27 and a Cape Dory 25. It takes at least 30' for 2 people to live reasonably comfortable, then you also have to enjoy that life style. We would eventually like to get a Beneteau 37. (dream on) and I also would enjoy having a Cheoy Lee Clipper Ketch. I love sails! I do prefer fiberglass boats from the late 60's to mid 70's, they were built like tanks and the full keel ones I would feel comfortable taking anywhere in the world.:)
     
  4. Expeditioner

    Expeditioner Well-Known Member

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    Cheoy Lee's are nice. My parents owned a 48' aft cockpit ketch. It was built in 1979. I sailed it up and down the eastern seaboard and to Costa Rica. I sold the boat 3 years ago.

    How did you like the Catalina?
     
  5. sailaway

    sailaway Well-Known Member

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    The Catalina was light and fast, but not quite as high quality as the ODay. At only 27' it was a little more bohemian for living on. It was also a 1973 and had space efficiency problems compared to the floating condos built today. It was the boat for the sailing I was doing at the time. Being more of a cookie cutter boat they are relatively inexpensive and there are alot of them around. I would probably lean more toward a higher quality boat. I like the idea of being able to go anywhere in the world.

    Cheoy Lee is my dream boat, I used to sit and look at them in Sailing Magazine while in high school and think someday I will have a clipperketch that could go anywhere in the world. You look like somebody when your flying 4 sails.:2thumb:
     
  6. Expeditioner

    Expeditioner Well-Known Member

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    I miss the Cheoy Lee and hindsight being 20/20, I should have held on to it. :cry:

    I have not been impressed with any of the Catalina's that I have looked at..........the only ODay that I have come across needed major repair work. my area.
     
  7. MattC

    MattC New Member

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    Hi guys, I apologize for bumping an older thread, but I was searching for sailboat threads and this came up.

    I have an Irwin Citation 35.5 that I tore down and rebuilt for eventual living aboard and self-sustainable cruising. My goal is to move to a larger, heavier displacement craft for long-term voyaging but in the meantime if things break down, I feel I'm prepared to go for an extended period of time.

    Boat prices have come WAY down and for those looking to get into a cruising sailboat, now is a great time.

    Anyway, I look forward to more discussions on this topic here.

    Best,

    Matt
     
  8. GatorDude

    GatorDude Well-Known Member

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    I think that living aboard and sailing away from a catastrophe is a very good option. Sure, a fiberglass sailboat is no man-o-war, but unruly mobs aren't likely to take to the high seas immediately and--when the do--they are not likely to have the skills to succeed immediately.

    In addition, most marinas are tightly knit communities and most boaters are very resourceful. Plus, there is no shortage of gear to support self-sufficiency aboard a sailboat. Unfortunately, when times get tight, it's easy to ditch a boat and lose a lot of recurring expenses (marina fees, etc.). Of course, if you've got the money, this is the time to buy.
     
  9. sailaway

    sailaway Well-Known Member

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    Glad to see the thread resserected. It seems we boat owners are chronic malcontents when it comes to size. We always want the next size up. My 31'er is the right boat for the sailing I am doing now. I do want something 40-50' though. I agree alot of people will plunder homes before trhey take to the marinas and high seas. The ones doing it are ignorant and don't understand boats, and probably don't know how to swim either.
    My wife and I spent the Laborday holiday sailing, and out on a hook in the anchorage a couple of days, even got a little fishing in. It's kind of nice to end the day and relax when the sun sets. We enjoyed fresh fish on the grill and there's nothing like hopping in the lake for a bath. We even had a nice sailing wind most of the weekend.:)