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Family Gopher
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Discussion Starter #1
Started to post this on the 'what's everybody canning today' thread but decided to make a thread of it.

Anyone on board ever CAN your own lard? So as to store it at room temp without it going rancid within a year or so?

I purchased 35 lb [hard frozen] pig fat at an Amish slaughterhouse Saturday for $5; got it iced down and thawing in an ice chest now; was hoping to rend it all in one batch, but now I'm questioning if my Hamilton Beach roaster oven is big enough to handle it all, it would be filled to the brim.

From what I'm reading on the web different places, 250 F lard poured into HOT sterilized jars and sealed immediately will keep 3 yrs easily. I've never done this before, but will be into the thick of it tommorrow or next day.

Anyone have any advice/tips to share?
 

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Meoww
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I have rendered lard but never caned it so if any one knows how bring it on!
 

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Premium Member
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I guess I can lard ... and didn't know it. lol

I use my half gallon mason jars for lard. Pretty much like you said, 250 F lard poured into HOT sterilized jars. They seal and go to the cellar.

I do mine out of doors, on a burner and not in the oven. As a tip ... if your roaster oven will be filled to the brim ... only do half. (IMO ;))

Let us know how it works out. :wave:
 

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Texan
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I have canned bacon fat and canned lard from plastic tubs in quart jars.

I have only canned the bacon fat in 1/2 pint jars, dont have that much around much of the time.

http://www.preparedsociety.com/forum/f36/whats-everybody-canning-today-9781/index46.html#post152389

For the lard in quart jars, I melted it and poured it into quart jars and pressured it at 10psi for an hour. When it cooled, it looked just like Crisco in the jars.

I would expect that canning lard rendered from pork fat trimmings would be the same for canning bacon fat.
 

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Newbie
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I have over 50lbs of pork fat and it is almost hunting season again. My mom passed away in Feb. So I never got the chance to learn or render it down. I'm interested to read up if you'll post how it goes? Eagerly waiting.

So, On the rendering I just need to run it through a gringer? and then melt away?:confused:
 

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Premium Member
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I have over 50lbs of pork fat and it is almost hunting season again. My mom passed away in Feb. So I never got the chance to learn or render it down. I'm interested to read up if you'll post how it goes? Eagerly waiting.

So, On the rendering I just need to run it through a gringer? and then melt away?:confused:
The Encyclopedia of Country Living ... Caral Emery. Your Library should have a copy or two. ;)
 

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Texan
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Family Gopher
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Discussion Starter #9
I guess I can lard ... and didn't know it. lol

I use my half gallon mason jars for lard. Pretty much like you said, 250 F lard poured into HOT sterilized jars. They seal and go to the cellar.
Sounds like you have been. I think I'm going to do a mix of qts., pts., and 1/2 pts. just to see which works best, and to give some away and get some feedback. I'm curious, do you refrigerate the 1/2 gallon jars after opening?

I'm 100% novice when it comes to rendering and canning lard, but, I've been reading a lot and gotten feedback from old timers. Non hydrogenated lard w/o preservatives stored at room temperature will go rancid, sometimes within 6 months.

I do mine out of doors, on a burner and not in the oven. As a tip ... if your roaster oven will be filled to the brim ... only do half. (IMO ;))
Exactly. I've just filled the roaster set on low at around 210 F, plan on cranking the temp up to 250 F towards the end. Botulism spores killed at 240F and all moisture evaporated away.

Heehee, that's the plan anyway.

And yes, I'm moving the operation outdoors to the shelter! :)
 

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We tried the crockpot version but found doing it outside was a lot easier and quicker.

We just rendered it down and put in sterilized jars and put a lid and ring on it. we have an extra bathroom well 1/2 bath and our lard from a year ago sits in there. all the piping in that area keeps it nice and cold.
 

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I've had no problem with it going rancid but keep in mind ... I use it a lot. As for to refrigerate or not ... right now mine is not. (but at times, I think more out of habit ... I have put it in the frig.)

Always something to make ... candles, soap, lotion and potions. lol

Let us know how it works out.
 

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Family Gopher
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Discussion Starter #12
I've had no problem with it going rancid but keep in mind ... I use it a lot....
From talking to the old timers, the common tendency among those who make and consume their own lard, whether done intentionally or not, is to use it all before it does goes rancid.

As for to refrigerate or not ... right now mine is not. (but at times, I think more out of habit ... I have put it in the frig.) .....
My intent, with this [yet another] 'dabbling' of mine, is to see how well it will keep outside of refrigeration by being intentionally 'canned' for that purpose.

Always something to make ... candles, soap, lotion and potions. lol
I'm curious, could you use/have you used rancid lard for any or all of the above?

Let us know how it works out.
Whew, lardy! Long day yesterday, but it was a learner. One thing I learned is to turn the heat up some and get on with it. It was dark before I got the last bit into containers. I've got the last ten lbs of fat on right now, but, now I know what I'm doing! Ha! No worries!

25 lbs pig fat equals 10 qts lard cooked to 255 F (hard-ball stage on the candy/deep fry thermometer).

There was a lot more water in the fat than I had anticipated, the temp won't go above 212 F until nearly all water has been evaporated from the fat, THEN it begins to rise RAPIDLY, and it's at that point you need to have your HOT sterilized jars ready to fill and seal immediately. I sterilized the jars at 240 in the oven (left there until lard was done and ready to be canned). Love her, my wife pitched in at this critical point and helped immensely, it's just about a two person operation to get that hot lard into those hot jars and sealed before it cools too much.

I put the last two qts of lard into an empty Armour lard bucket to keep in the frige for immediate use.
 

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Premium Member
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Love the pictures & your lard looks grand!

As for using rancid lard, I would think not ... I could not get by the smell.
 

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Family Gopher
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Discussion Starter #14
....As for using rancid lard, I would think not ... I could not get by the smell.
Didn't know just how bad rancid lard would be, some cooking oils just have an unpleasant smell when they go rancid, or so I've read.
 

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performing monkey
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I posted a while ago about rendering and preserving different lard, specifically graebenschmaltz, but the search function is glitching on me today! :gaah:
 

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canning lard is easy. the key is to simmer long enough to get all the water and impurities (cracklings) out so it stores longest. Here is the technique:


there are 2 ways to prepare fat for canning. the direct method is used for fat like you have - bulk fat basically right off the critter (yours looks like it may be all ready chopped) This also works for not only lard, but any other fat you want to save for cooking or other uses (chicken fat, btw, is superior in cakes).


1. Direct rendering:

Chop the fat up fine. I like an old meat grinder for this, if your food processor will handle it, it will work too. The finer the chop, the quicker the render.

Place chopped fat in a large pot, melt over LOW heat. A double boiler works best for this, if you can rig one up or have one. It takes a long time, so schedule at least one whole day for this.

Cook until all the fat in the pot is liquid, and the connective tissue that cooks out sinks down to the bottom. These are called cracklings and are good, too.

Strain the melted fat through a cotton or muslin cloth wrung out in hot water. Set aside the cracklings.

Reheat the fat and simmer to remove any water in it (10 min simmer time at least).

Meanwhile, heat up jars in the oven (Heat jars in a 250 degree oven for 20 minutes, without rings or seals.) and sterilize the flat lids (not the rings) by pouring boiling water over them and letting it sit until needed.

When the fat is well boiled, pour hot into a hot jar, and top with a freshly dried lid. Fill up to 1/4 inch to the top. As it cools it will seal. Keep in a dark cool place. Keeps at least two years - mine keeps even longer.


2. Water method: Used for cleaning mixed fats, or cleaning used fats taken from soups, or that have bits of tissue on them.

You do not need a double boiler for this, just boil the fats with an equal amount of water on the stove on medium heat until melted.

Let cool in the pot, then refrigerate in the pot, water and all. The fat will rise up. Remove the solid cake, scrape off any 'stuff' on the bottom so you have only plain fat.

Reheat if you want to can it. You need to drive out residual water and impurities.

This is handy if you have a strong flavored fat (goose fat, mutton, etc) that you want to mix with a mild fat (beef suet or lard) to tame down the flavor. This will also clean fats saved from soups, gravies, or salt meats.

Then boil it and can it as in the direct method.


Remember those cracklings? Use them measure for measure for fat in biscuits or cornbread. Use them to season a mess of greens or green beans. Even good in boiled beans, adding fat and an indescribable bacony, crunchy flavor.

Saving other fats is done the same way. I keep fats seperate depending on their use: chicken, turkey and goose measure for measure for the fat in baking, lard for pie crusts and frying, beef fat for high temperature frying (french fries), deer tallow for waterproofing buckskins and leathers, as well as for skin-softening herbal creams. Only when there are impurities in the fats do they start to smell bad, so render any fats you plan to save to make them clean.

Hopefully this will help you process all that wonderful lard you scored!
 

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Oh yes, forgot to mentioned that fat boils at 250 degrees so once the water is out (which boils at 212) and you simmer it a bit, it will be plenty hot enough to kill off any bugs/germs/etc.
 

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I love the way it comes out and cools. Then it looks like cake icing, or something.
 

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Lordy--I read this thread every day hoping someone will answer my question..
~~~~When the fat is well boiled, pour hot into a hot jar, and top with a freshly dried lid. Fill up to 1/4 inch to the top. As it cools it will seal. Keep in a dark cool place. Keeps at least two years - mine keeps even longer.~~~~

Can I use this method with SavaLot lard??? It is Field's lard---bought when it was $25 and that bucket is $45 now---I'd love to seal in jars but I have it in my cool storage room unopened.
Why did I buy a 5 gallon bucket?? Temporary insanity????:gaah:I sure don't want to lose 25 lbs of lard.

Whoa--so if I heated my lard, sealed in jars, it would look clear like those until it cools?? :confused:


I have lots of jars--do I seal or not??

I remember those cracklings--and if kids today ran around that lard vat burning at XXX degrees?? Lordy, CHS would be there so fast to take those kids to a home--I mean it.
 

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Family Gopher
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Discussion Starter #20
Lordy--I read this thread every day hoping someone will answer my question..
~~~~When the fat is well boiled, pour hot into a hot jar, and top with a freshly dried lid. Fill up to 1/4 inch to the top. As it cools it will seal. Keep in a dark cool place. Keeps at least two years - mine keeps even longer.~~~~

Can I use this method with SavaLot lard??? It is Field's lard---bought when it was $25 and that bucket is $45 now---I'd love to seal in jars but I have it in my cool storage room unopened.
Why did I buy a 5 gallon bucket?? Temporary insanity????:gaah:

I have lots of jars--do I seal or not??
Yes, you could can the Savalot lard. However the Savalot lard has been hydrogenated (at least partially) with preservatives added to it. There's no telling how long that lard will keep just as is, and non refrigerated at that. Home rendered lard, on the other hand, can and will eventually go rancid, thus the effort to seal it in jars.

It's interesting to note that some nutrition experts are now saying straight up natural lard is second only to olive oil for health benefits when it comes to fats our body needs. Lard is basically a monosaturated fat like olive oil, and is even more healthy than butter.

It's also interesting to note that restaurants in NYC and Holland, where trans fats have been outlawed for them to serve to the public, have now switched to lard because it contains no trans fats, EVEN the hydrogenated lard like the Savalot kind contains no trans fats!

Heehee:

64-Year-Old Can of Lard Still Edible Today

"According to BBC News, the German man received the can of lard in 1948 when the U.S. was in the middle of an aid program to help rebuild Germany after World War II. A student at the time, Feldmeier decided to save the lard tin for emergencies and he has held onto it ever since."

"Feldmeier decided to get the lard tested because of debates about expiration dates and food safety. He took it to food safety experts in Germany, who ultimately deemed the 64-year-old can edible for human consumption. Food safety expert Frerk Feldusen explained that while the lard was gritty, tasteless, and difficult to dissolve, it was still edible."

Hydrogenated and loaded with preservatives no doubt
 
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