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Go to the nearest airport that sells "JETA" fuel.
NOT AvGas, JET A.

It is kerosene. Ask for the stuff they drain from their filters :) Might have to run it through a coffee filter, but hey....

The best alternative, by far - even in winter. I would use wood for heat - and lamp oil ONLY if it's the only source of fuel left.
Sorry didn't mean I was using lamps for heat. Being they put off heat, winter is when I would plan to use them. Too hot in summer to add any heat load as it is. Plus more sune to keep batteries charged up.

Hope that is clear as mud now..:D

Jimmy
 

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Jack of all trades?
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Sorry didn't mean I was using lamps for heat. Being they put off heat, winter is when I would plan to use them. Too hot in summer to add any heat load as it is. Plus more sun to keep batteries charged up.
Oh, I read it clearly enough... I have numerous candles far the same purpose. A few years ago Wal-Mart had the "Catholic" candles on sale for 68 cents each and I bought a bunch.

I sincerely doubt things will get so bad we come down to having such a small amount of liquid oil that it must be conserved for other purposes other than lamps. The only "liquid-oil-type-product" I have in abundance is used motor oil - and it doesn't work well for oil lamps.

The days of easy-to-find pretroleum are well over. If the oil industry ever collapses, there will never be enough money gathered up to get started again - the technology is too expensive and all the "easy to find" (Penn state in the late 1800's) oil is gone.
 

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Lamp oil or more commonly know as paraffin is in fact just cleaner kerosene. They take pains to remove all of the sulphur content. This is what makes the stink. True k1 will burn just as cleanly as "lamp oil". It is lamp oil after all. Plain kerosene is "stove oil". This is what is commonly found in bulk at gas stations and other establishments. It doesn't need to be as clean because of the higher combustion temperatures found in stoves and heaters.

How to burn a lamp well should be the question.. Not the fuel. It is a secondary issue.

Don't buy a modern lamp. They are made very cheaply with pressed steel plate coated with thin nickel plating, the burner also has too many holes in the base for air flow so the combustion air isn't heated well. Both the thin metal and many holes contribute to the issue. Then they have very thin chimneys that are also too short to keep the heat in. If they made them taller they would crack... So without the proper design and production standards they can't be expected to operate for more than a few hours as a novelty item.

Do Find yourself a lamp at least pre WWII. It will be well made and burn the fuel properly. It has already stood the test of time.. So it will last.
Do... Trim the wick in a semi-circle. This will force the flame taller.
The taller flame will be brighter without making the flame large.
Do.. keep the lamp full. your wink will last longer if it stays wet.
Do use the right chimney and wick. The wrong chimney and wick will cause it to stink.


You can find old lamps at yard sales, online auctions, or flea markets. I have a few old ones... 100 plus at this point and never paid more than 20 dollars. Even as recently as this past summer.
 

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I've never tried it in a Lamp or Lantern, but my guess is that it would smoke. In a Kerosene Stove, even if the K-1 fuel is contaminated with diesel (#1 or #2), it will not burn clean and will give off an odor. Every once in a while, I will get a bad batch of Kerosene. It most likely gets contaminated when a fuel tanker switches from diesel to K-1. The way I understand it is a tanker (or compartment) used for K-1, should always be used just for K-1. They say just a gallon or two of diesel can contaminate a whole tank.

Just for a little extra info, I believe K-1 is the purist form of diesel. I've seen people run it in their diesel trucks, although it is illegal to run without a road tax on it. Some Kerosene has Red Dye in it, but I refuse to burn Red Dye fuel in the house. Luckily enough places sell the "K-1 Clear" around here. My friend's store started selling Red Dye Kerosene and I quit buying it from him. I would use it in an emergency, but not as a routine.

Bill
xxxxxxxxxxxxx
 

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Lamp oil or more commonly know as paraffin is in fact just cleaner kerosene. They take pains to remove all of the sulphur content. This is what makes the stink. True k1 will burn just as cleanly as "lamp oil". It is lamp oil after all. Plain kerosene is "stove oil". This is what is commonly found in bulk at gas stations and other establishments. It doesn't need to be as clean because of the higher combustion temperatures found in stoves and heaters.

How to burn a lamp well should be the question.. Not the fuel. It is a secondary issue.

Don't buy a modern lamp. They are made very cheaply with pressed steel plate coated with thin nickel plating, the burner also has too many holes in the base for air flow so the combustion air isn't heated well. Both the thin metal and many holes contribute to the issue. Then they have very thin chimneys that are also too short to keep the heat in. If they made them taller they would crack... So without the proper design and production standards they can't be expected to operate for more than a few hours as a novelty item.

Do Find yourself a lamp at least pre WWII. It will be well made and burn the fuel properly. It has already stood the test of time.. So it will last.
Do... Trim the wick in a semi-circle. This will force the flame taller.
The taller flame will be brighter without making the flame large.
Do.. keep the lamp full. your wink will last longer if it stays wet.
Do use the right chimney and wick. The wrong chimney and wick will cause it to stink.

You can find old lamps at yard sales, online auctions, or flea markets. I have a few old ones... 100 plus at this point and never paid more than 20 dollars. Even as recently as this past summer.
Thank you for this post, but I just have to say....I burst out laughing when I red the typo - "Your wink will last longer if it stays wet." :D
 

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SWEET SMELLING KEROSENE

One way to freshen the scent of burning kerosene lamps is to add a few drops of potpourri essential oil to each lamp full of kero. I have tried vanilla scent and mulberry scent so far, and they completely mask the distinctive kerosene aroma. Only a few drops of the essential oils are needed, and the price per 1/4 fl oz is certainly not excessive considering the limited quantities used.

Sweet smelling kerosene additives for kerosene heaters are usually 1/3cc or 91% alcohol, an ounce or two of Low Odor Mineral Spirits and a few drops of potpourri oil. The cost per treatment is negligible if you make it yourself, plus you have the added advantage of using the potpourri essential oil of your choice.

There are two types of potpourri scents: alcohol based and water based. You want the alcohol based variety.

If you guys out there don't know what potpourri essential oils are, ask a woman...it's a girl thing.

SWEET SMELLING KEROSENE
 

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Okay, stupid question that I should've asked in the first post. WHERE do you get kerosene? Sounds like I'll prefer lamp oil, but need kerosene as a backup.
You get one gallon cans of kerosene at Wal-Mart (in the paint section), Home Depot, and Lowes. Some Home Depot and Lowes stores have kerosene in 5 gallon cans or 2 1/2 gallon containers. A lot of hardware stores have one gallon cans of kerosene.
 

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IF you have to use diesel in a lamp , a few drops of liquid soap will help with the nasty smell issue, but you still want good ventalation, winter diesel 1 would be better if available.
 
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Lamp oil may be safer because keresine is not what it use to be since they have added chemicles to it .Just like oil, we use to use it on mangy dogs,now it would probably kill the do along with the mange.
I'm not aware of any "chemicals" added to it. What chemicals do you believe are in there?

I always believed it is K-1 crystal clear pure Kerosene.

Bill
 

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Red Kerosene

There are two types of kerosene, K-1 and red Kerosene. Red kerosene is slightly less expensive than K-1 and has been dyed red for tax purposes. It is generally used for tractors or generators. Red kerosene also burns faster than K-1 kerosene, so it must be replaced more frequently. Burning red kerosene is harmful to your health because of the by-products of the dyes.

K-1 Kerosene

K-1 kerosene is an extremely popular choice of fuel because it is easily available and typically very cheap. You can purchase kerosene from filling stations or you can purchase it in prepackaged containers. K-1 contains sulfur and other impurities that make it smell unpleasant when it is burning. If you burn the kerosene outside, you may not notice the smell as much as if you burn the kerosene indoors.

Lamp Oil

Lamp oil is in the same family as kerosene, but it has been purified to make it burn cleanly. The burning of lamp oil produces fewer pollutants than burning kerosene. It does not produce the unpleasant odors of burning kerosene and can be purchased in a variety of scents. Lamp oil can be purchased in most supermarkets, but it is more expensive than kerosene. It also does not burn as brightly as kerosene.

Read more: Lamp Oil Vs. Kerosene | eHow.com Lamp Oil Vs. Kerosene | eHow.com
 

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Whatever you're burning to provide light, PLEASE make sure to have plenty of "make up" air coming into the area where the lamps are burning. All combustion, even the "clean" lamp oil, produces carbon monoxide, which can't be seen, smelled, or otherwise detected by people or animals.

If burning in winter, keep a window cracked open to let some fresh air in.

I know this isn't directly on topic, but I'd hate to hear about an unfortunate accident brought about by some innocent experimentation.
 

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I was just wondering the same thing that the OP posted several years ago. From what I understand (and I could be very wrong), kerosene has a very long shelf life as compared to many other fuels. I also found some small "smell reducer" bottles on clearance at WM for about 50 cents each that you add to reduce the smell. We have a kerosene heater, that we've never used, along with a few gallons of fuel that came with it at a garage sale. I also have some hurricane lamps (again that I have never used) and had no idea I could burn kerosene in them, so that's good to know. I just went and put some extra wicks in my cart b/c they are cheap and a lamp won't do ya much good without wicking.

However, hurricane lamps would be my last choice for lighting b/c of the risk of fire and also the soot factor and the smell. On cold winters, the last thing I want to do is keep a window cracked so I could have light. I will hopefully use my LED lights and use the rechargeable batteries refreshed by by solar charger. If that is not an option due to low sun levels or whatever, then I will burn candles. I'm thinking candles would emit less smoke and carbon monoxide. But I could be wrong on that point too. I just have more experience with candles.o_O
 

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For lamps I prefer Aladdin lamps and the gasoline lamps with mantles. Both of these lamps can work with multiple fuels including alcohol and still produce a lot of light.
 

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Kerosene does have a long shelf life. You want to look for K-1, the clear stuff, which is a lot cheaper if you can find it at certain gas stations than what you will find in Home Depot and such. Your main concern in storage of kerosene is to keep it sealed to make sure that moisture does not get into the kerosene.

It is relatively low odor when used in kerosene heaters and lamps. If you burn your lamp with too much of a flame then it will produce carbon soot. Just keep the flame lower, you will be able to tell when it’s too high. Oil lamps are much safer than candles when used for light. Remember that an oil lamp has the flame contained inside the glass globe and it has a much more stable base when compared to a candle. Also use caution if you have pets around candles and even lamps.

The kerosene heaters really only smell a lot when you extinguish the flame. It helps if you can take it outdoors and then turn it off and let it sit for a minute or two before bringing it back inside.

I bought a battery powered CO detector just in case, burning the kerosene heaters never registered anything on the detector. DO NOT burn the old-style Coleman stoves or Coleman pump-up style mantle lanterns that use gasoline inside a building.
 

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I am all for propane & a generator, over the lamp oil or kerosene.
Wax candle can be safe if you use a glass chimney, they are easier & safer to store.
I like the lamp because it does not smell.
 
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I am all for propane & a generator, over the lamp oil or kerosene.
Noooo...... waste of good fuel.
Solar panels & LED lights go 100,000 times further
 

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i have both hurricane lanterns and lamps plus over 1,000 candles yes both give off soot .I also have over 90 gallons of k-1 stored in sealed containers in a dark place for just such emergency’s. battery’s won't last as long as k-1 or candles you would have to fall back to the old ways sooner or later if everything breaks down
 
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